jpeterson68@hamline.edu
Jillian Peterson 2019 Header

Contact Info

Jillian Peterson
jpeterson68@hamline.edu

Jillian Peterson

Assistant Professor

Contact Info

Jillian Peterson
jpeterson68@hamline.edu

Biography

Jillian Peterson is an assistant professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Hamline University. She has a Master’s degree and Ph.D. in Psychology and Social Behavior from the University of California, Irvine, and a Bachelors’ degree in Sociology from Grinnell College. Prior to graduate school, Professor Peterson worked as a mitigation specialist in Chicago and New York City, investigating the psychosocial life histories of men facing the death penalty for their sentencing hearings. She has also worked as a research coordinator at the University of Minnesota, as a trial consultant, and as a forensic psychology trainer. Professor Peterson has published multiple articles on offenders with mental illness, risk assessment, psychopathy, and school shootings. Her areas of expertise include forensic psychology, mental illness in the criminal justice system, research methods and statistics, and violent crime.

Teaching Style

Professor Peterson hopes to give students a rich and exciting experience that provides them with the resources and perspective necessary to examine their world with a social scientific lens– from current research findings, to public policy, to societal problems, to their everyday lives. She enters the classroom each day with genuine excitement about the field of criminal justice, integrating the latest research in the field and connecting concepts to current events. Professor Peterson gives students the space to make the course their own by filling the classes with interactive activities, lively discussion, and reflective writing assignments that challenge students to think critically and creatively about the topics they are excited about.

“Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.”

- William Butler Yeats

“The field of criminal justice is constantly evolving and changing, which makes it an exciting place to be. I strive to make my classes thought-provoking and relevant to my students’ lives. I think of the classroom as an open, honest space, where students are free to share their experiences and express their diverse opinions. I hope students walk away with the tools they need to think critically about the field of criminal justice, and a passion to improve it.”

-Jillian Peterson