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  • BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS

    Do you dream of being the CEO of a Fortune 500 company? Or maybe it’s running a nonprofit that excites you. With a business degree from Hamline, you’ll graduate with the knowledge and connections you’ll need to start your career in business—whether in the private, public, or nonprofit sector.

    FINE ARTS

    In the Hamline Arts programs, the world is your canvas. Develop your artistic voice and vision through your personal exploration of the fine arts. You’ll gain an understanding of the traditions and history, while you hone your own technical craft and develop the skills to channel your passion into a fulfilling career in the arts.

    GLOBAL STUDIES

    Attention, globetrotters! This program is designed to develop compassionate, informed citizens of the world, ready to take on the complex challenges of the 21st century. You’ll study here and abroad to understand societies and cultures around the world.

    HUMANITIES & CULTURE

    Made up of several different disciplines—including History, Literature, and Philosophy—the Humanities & Culture program explores the heart of the human experience. The humanities seek to answer the larger questions about who we are and what our lives should mean.

    JUSTICE & LAW

    Hamline offers programs in social and criminal justice, political science, and global studies.  We also provide a unique combination of opportunities for students interested in attending law school. These programs will help you develop a deeper understanding of legal and political systems in relation to social justice, human rights, and diplomacy.

    MEDIA STUDIES

    Media Studies programs at Hamline include Journalism, Communications, Digital Media Arts, Theatre Arts, Professional Writing, and more. So if you’ve got a passion for communicating—through words, design, or performance—The Media Studies program might be the right fit for you.

    SCIENCES & HEALTH

    Do you want to cure diseases? Help develop sustainable solutions to combat climate change? In Hamline’s science and health programs, you’ll explore the natural and physical worlds within and around us as you conduct research alongside professors trying to solve real-world problems.

    SOCIAL SCIENCES

    The social sciences take a scientific approach to studying human nature. You’ll come to understand the systems that shape human behavior and society, learn about social structures and how they have evolved over time, and engage in research to solve critical problems.

  • The First-Year Seminar Program is a program unique to Hamline that provides incoming students with an introduction to college and a sense of community. You’ll explore a topic of your choosing while you hone your writing, speaking, and critical thinking skills. These seminars change each year and are usually related to the current cultural/political landscape—they vary widely and can cover some very interesting topics.

  • THE F WORD:

    GENDER, POWER, AND PRIVILEGE IN AMERICA
    Dare to use the F Word: Feminism! Students in this section of First-Year Seminar will learn about feminism, including its definitions and how it can be used for knowledge production and activism for social justice. Our course will use the Ms. Magazine digital reader to access current and historical publications about feminism. We will spend the semester exploring the intersectional aspects of gender, race, class, and sexuality in American culture through topics such as violence against women, equity and labor, media and popular culture, women in leadership, and more.

    TRASH TALK:

    DISCARDED THINGS, RUINED PLACES, AND INVISIBLE PEOPLE
    This course examines trash – uncovering the things and places ignored by design. We will apply an anthropological lens, traveling across time and space, to explore our complex relationship with rubbish and ruins. We will begin with “garbology”, an archaeological perspective on consumption and waste. Next we will explore the lives of the people most involved with the material residue of our world – employing ethnography to understand sanitation workers, urban explorers, pickers, hoarders, and freegans. Finally, we will critically examine the globalized nature of modern refuse, from industrial ruins to ship-breaking, attempting to trace some of the entanglement between place, people and discarded things.