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    Waters to the Sea® Stories Webinar Series

    The Waters to the Sea® Stories webinar series connects CGEE’s acclaimed educational resources with the expertise of our diverse partners in environmental education. Each webinar will dive deep into an environmental topic with a subject matter expert and explore how educators can use the lessons in the Waters to the Sea® multimedia programs to bring that topic to life for students learning in the classroom or remotely.

    Upcoming Webinars

    TEACHING SENSE OF PLACE ONLINE WITH CARA RIECKENBERG 

    Tuesday, December 8, 6 p.m. - 7 p.m. CST

    Graphic - WTTS Montage 300Presenter: Edina Public Schools 4th and 5th grade teacher Dr. Cara Rieckenberg.
    Master environmental educator and CGEE River Institute Director Cara Rieckenberg will take us on a deep dive into the pedagogy of teaching STEM online with Big River Journey Online and Waters to the Sea® Mississippi River AdventureRegister here. 
    Explore Big River Journey Online, Waters to the Sea, and all our online classroom resources.

    Last Webinar

    DAKOTA PLACE AND KINSHIP WITH THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER

    November 10, 2020, 6 p.m. - 7 p.m. CST

    Graphic - Little Crow Village 300Webinar Video
    Presenters: Lower Phalen Creek Project and Wakáŋ Tipi Center Director Maggie Lorenz (Spirit Lake Dakota/Turtle Mountain Ojibwe) and board member Dr. Kate Beane (Flandreau Santee Sioux), and CGEE Assistant Director John Shepard
    From time immemorial the Mississippi River Wakpá Táŋka (Great River) has been and remains important to the Dakota people, providing plants, animals, a route for transportation and trade, and sites of cultural and spiritual significance. The Lower Phalen Creek Project and the Wakáŋ Tipi Center’s Maggie Lorenz and Dr. Kate Beane joined us to explore Dakota Place and Kinship with the Mississippi River. This webinar features place-based video stories; a live presentation; connections to educational resources; and audience Q&A. 
    Image: Little Crow Village on the Mississippi by Seth Eastman, Minnesota Historical Society