• NCORE Team


    carlos sneed - web
      
         


    Carlos Sneed



    Assistant Dean for Diversity and Community/ Director of the Hedgeman Center
    Fourteen Years at Hamline University
    Clarksville, Tennessee

     

    WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO PARTICIPATE IN THE HAMLINE UNIVERISTY NCORE NETWORK?
    I convene, staff and coordinate the Hamline University NCORE Team with hopes of bring new ideas, resources and energy back to the university to enhance our programming, development and training on racial justice issues.  It is very rewarding to see the personal and collective growth in our Hamline team members’ awareness, education, confidence and passion for anti-racism work as a result of attending the national conference, participating in the team and action back on campus the following year.

    For my personal professional development, NCORE always provides a respite from the work at Hamline by allowing my opportunities to network with other professionals who are engaged in the same type of work as I am at Hamline. At NCORE, I gain energy, passion, commitment and the support of colleagues and allies from across the nation, and I return with new ideas, creativity, questions and resources. NCORE feeds my professional soul and rekindles my appetite and capacity to stay in the work for racial justice.  

    WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE NCORE MEMORY or SESSION?
    I enjoyed sessions led by Laurie Lippin (Targeted and Privileged: The Importance of Examining Whiteness within the LGBT Community) and Francie Kendell (Examining White Public Space), the Conversation with Mark Anthony Neal, and, of course, Van Jones’ keynote address during which he reminded us “you can’t be an anti-immigrant bigot and a patriot at the same time.”

    WHAT DID YOU TAKE AWAY FROM THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE?
    I left NCORE with a renewed commitment to educating students about race, racism, inclusion, coalition-building, ally development and racial justice. In particular, this year I returned to Hamline will a stronger goal, determination and conviction to create meaningful dialogue for Hamline students on race, racism and racial justice.

    WHAT ARE YOUR PERSONAL GOALS FOR THIS ACADEMIC YEAR?
    My goal is to lead our team in developing meaningful, educational, empowering initiatives at Hamline University that change lives, organizations, institutions, policies, and relationships so that all people can enjoy full access, equity and participation in our communities, nation and world. I hope to focus on student dialogue, increasing participation and education among populations who tend to shy away from anti-racism initiatives (e.g., male students, white students), and providing increased support for staff professional development on diversity and inclusion issues.

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  • Hamline News

    The International and Off-Campus Programs office announces its transition to a full service Global Engagement Center starting this summer. 

    The summer class titled Special Topics: Environmental Synergy created a memorial for those killed by police and police killed in the line of duty in the last year. The community is invited to add flowers or comments in chalk to pay tribute to the victims.

    Esteemed author Coe Booth has joined the MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults (MFAC) Program as a faculty member. Booth has published numerous books for adolescents including Tyrell, Bronxwood, and her latest novel, Kinda Like Brothers.