• Inclusive Teaching Resources by Topic

    Advising/mentoring
    Assessing cultural competencies
    Civic engagement, democracy, and service learning
    Classroom climate
    Curriculum development
    Faculty diversity
    Religious diversity in the classroom

    Advising/Mentoring Resources for Inclusive Teaching


    •    Cohen, G.L., Steele, C.M., & Ross, L.D. (1999). The mentor’s dilemma: Providing critical feedback across the racial divide. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 25(10), 1302-1318. 

    This article provides advice for dealing with issues surrounding stereotype threat when mentoring minority students. It uses information from studies about bias and motivation to help mentors to provide useful, but not discouraging, feedback to students who may be negatively impacted by racial stereotypes.

    •    Heisserer, D.L. & Parette, P. (2002). Advising at-risk students in college and university settings. College Student Journal, 36(1), 69-83. View online

    This article provides information about intrusive advising techniques, which means that university advisers actively connect with at-risk students who identify with minority groups on
    campus. The article describes models of successful advising and the advising skills that are necessary to reach students from diverse backgrounds.

    •    Hurte, V.J. (2002). Mentoring: The forgotten retention tool. Black Issues in Higher Education, 19(18), 49. View online

    The author of this article describes how mentoring, in addition to career advising, can be a valuable tool for retaining minority students. This article offers advise for using a more systematic and results-oriented approach to mentoring and retention.   
     
    •    Priest, R. & McPhee, S.A. (2000). Advising multicultural students: The reality of diversity. In Gordon, V. & Habley, W.R. (Eds.), Academic advising: A comprehensive handbook (pp. 105-117). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    This is a chapter within a book on advising in general. It focuses specifically on diversity issues to take into consideration when advising multicultural students. The book also contains information on differentiation in advising, assessing advisor effectiveness, and current research in advising.

    •    Sutton, E.M. (2006). Developmental mentoring of African American college men. In Cuyjet, M.J. (Ed.). African American men in college (pp. 95-111). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    This is a chapter in a book that examines issues African American men face in college. Along with suggestions for mentoring, the book also looks at campus climate, academics, and successful programs at various universities. *Coming soon to Bush Library*

    Resources for Assessing Cultural Competencies

     

    Print Resources

    •    Lewis, R.B. (1997). Assessment of student learning. In Morey, A.I. & Kitano, M.K. (Eds.), Multicultural course transformation in higher education (pp. 71-88). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

    This chapter focuses on special considerations for assessing a multicultural course. It addresses assessment techniques in general, as well as topics such as scheduling assessments,
    grading, feedback to students, and exams. There is also a worksheet for analyzing assessment strategies.

    •    Lynch, E. (1997). Instructional strategies. In A. Morey & M. Kitano (Eds.), Multicultural course transformation in higher education: A broader truth, (pp. 56-70). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

    This is a chapter in a book about inclusive teaching in higher education. Lynch examines how best to interact with diverse students throughout the learning process, including assessment
    and pre-assessment strategies.

    •    Meacham, J. (2000). Assessing diversity courses: Tips and tools. Diversity Digest, (Spring/Summer 00). View online

    This article is available in the online version of Diversity Digest and includes helpful tips involving learning goals, assessing the effectiveness of the course, final course assessment, classroom atmosphere, and assessment tools.

    •    National Leadership Council for Liberal Education & America’s Promise. (2007). College learning for the new global century. 

    This publication contains essential learning outcomes for college students, sections on the importance of inclusive excellence (in part 3), information on intercultural learning and assessment, and advice for best practices in the context of a changing world.

    •    Salisbury, M. and Goodman, K. (2009). Educational practices that foster intercultural competence. Diversity & Democracy, 12(2), 12-13. View online

    This article analyzes data to determine which practices work best for creating greater intercultural competence. It offers advice for assessing intercultural competence, as well as suggestions for helping students to have diverse experiences, integrative learning experiences, and organized instruction.

    •    Smith, Sherwood. (2005). Proving diversity classes make a difference: Effective assessment of students’ learning. In Ouellett, M. L. (Ed.), Teaching inclusively: Resources for course, department, and institutional change in higher education (pp. 421-434). Stillwater, OK: New Forums Press.

    This chapter provides advice for effective assessment of cultural competencies. It addresses rationale for assessment, aligning the course to specific objectives and institutional goals, ethical and political issues for assessment, and analyzing outcomes of assessment.

    Web Resources

    •    Cultural competency: Concepts & definitions. (2005). Alliance for Nonprofit Management.

    This list of cultural competency concepts and definitions was compiled by the Alliance for Nonprofit Management. It contains definitions as well as links to other resources and organizations, such as the National Center for Cultural Competence.

    •    Resources for classroom assessment. University of Washington

    From the Center for Instructional Development and Research, this guide provides information about assessing student learning, as well as the effectiveness of teaching techniques. The “Sources of Data for Assessment of Teaching” page is particularly useful.

    Civic Engagement, Democracy, and Service Learning Resources

    •    Calderón, J.Z. (2007). Race, poverty, and social justice: Multidisciplinary perspectives through service learning. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing, LLC.

    This book is part of the Service Learning for Civic Engagement Series. It contains sections on the history of service learning, as well as examples of community projects that address issues such as homelessness, international citizenship, multiculturalism, and equity.

    •    Cruz, N. (1990). A challenge to the notion of service. In Kendall, J.C., Combining service and learning: A resource book for community and public service (Vol. 1) (pp. 321-323). Raleigh, NC: National Society for Internships and Experiential Education.

    This chapter praises the increasing popularity of service learning, while also providing critical commentary on the sometimes unintentionally negative results of service learning. These include unrealistic views of multicultural issues and reinforcement of racist attitudes.

    •    Eyler, J., & Giles, D. (1999). Where's the learning in service-learning? San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    This book provides advice about how to successfully implement service-learning in higher education courses. It describes the various elements of service learning and also provides data to show how service learning affects students.

    •    Gronemeyer, M. (1992). Helping. In Sachs, W. (Ed.), The development dictionary: A guide to knowledge as power (pp. 53-69). London: Zed Books Ltd.

    As a critique of the modern notion of help, this article details how help has evolved over time from unconditional assistance, to selfishness in disguise. It provides evidence from topics such as religion to world politics, and in particular focuses on how much of international aid serves to further Euro-centric views and culture.

    •    Hamm, D., Dowell, D., & Houck, J. (1998). Service learning as a strategy to prepare teacher candidates for contemporary diverse classrooms. Education, 119(2), 196-204. 

    This is an analysis of how service learning assignments help to expose education students to issues of diversity. It uses assessment data from education programs that have implemented service learning requirements and describes the benefits service learning has created.

    •    Illich, I. (1968). To hell with good intentions. From The Conference on InterAmerican
    Student Projects (CLASP). Cuernavaca, Mexico. View online

    This address was given to Americans wishing to volunteer in Latin America. Illich uses stinging rhetoric to argue that most American volunteers are misguided in their intentions and end up doing more harm than good in terms of preservation of world cultures, and even when it comes to providing service to the poor in their own country.

    •    Johnson, B.T. & O’Grady, C.R. (2006). The spirit of service: Exploring faith, service, and social justice in higher education. Bolton, MA: Anchor Publishing Company.

        This book looks at the roles of faith, service, and social justice in higher education. It contains three sections which define and discuss the issues, show what they look like in practice, and delve deeper into suggestions for the future.

    •    Martinez-Saenz, M. (2009). Creating change: Arts, activism, and the academy. Diversity & Democracy, 12(2), 16-17. View online

    This article examines how the arts and social justice interact through creating a “visiting artist-activist program.” It examines a program at Wittenberg University and how it helps students to become more educated about the issues, as well as gain a greater interest in community service and civic engagement.

    •    O’Grady, C.R. (Ed.). (2000). Integrating service learning and multicultural education in colleges and universities. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.

    Service learning is addressed in this book as a way to enhance multicultural education through real-world applications. This book provides information about the theory behind service learning, multicultural education, and social justice. It also presents examples of specific courses taught using the integration of service learning and multicultural education.

    •    Pflugfelder, E.H. (2008). Finding context: Teaching about class through local history. Diversity & Democracy, 11(3), 16-17. View online

    This article provides advice for combining community engagement with issues of class. The author details an example of increasing class awareness among students by engaging them in local history through field trips, peer poll assignments, reading outsider critics, and oral histories.

    •    Reardon, K.M. (1998). Participatory action research as service learning. New Directions for Teaching and Learning 73, 57-64.

    This article shows how it is possible to integrate research for faculty and service learning for students. It provides examples of how faculty members have done this in the past and offers advice for implementing this method of research and service learning.

    •    Staub, S. and Finley, A. (2009). Service learning and learning communities: Promising pedagogies. Diversity & Democracy, 12(2), 18-19. View online

    The integration of service learning and learning communities is examined in this article. The article focuses on a program for first year students at Dickinson College and shows how to best implement learning communities as well as service learning initiatives.

    Classroom Climate Resources for Inclusive Teaching


    Print Resources

    •    Adams, M., Bell, L.A., & Griffin, P. (2007). Teaching for diversity and social justice. New York: Routledge.

    This book provides useful information on pedagogical frameworks for the classroom. It shows how reflection and experiential learning are important in social justice education. It also provides useful advice for facilitating social justice education courses. This book comes with a CD-ROM and a companion book is available, called Reading for Diversity and Social Justice.

    •    Classroom and workshop exercises. In Schoem, D., Frankel, L., Zúñiga, X., & Lewis, E.A. (Eds.), Multicultural Teaching in the University (pp. 313-333). Westport, CT: Praeger.

    This section of Multicultural Teaching in the University describes several classroom activities designed to increase student reflection and awareness of multicultural issues. Many of the exercises ask students to examine their own identities, as well as their own prejudices and biases.

    •    Ouellett, M. L. (2005). Teaching inclusively: Resources for course, department, and institutional change in higher education. Stillwater, OK: New Forums Press.

    Ouellett provides several examples of ways faculty have successfully implemented inclusive teaching in the classroom.

    •    Salisbury, M. & Goodman, K. (2009). Educational practices that foster intercultural competence. Diversity & Democracy, 12(2), 12-13. View online

    This article analyzes data to determine which practices work best for creating greater intercultural competence. It offers advice for assessing intercultural competence, as well as suggestions for helping students to have diverse experiences, integrative learning experiences, and organized instruction.

    •    Thiagarajan, S. (2006). Barnga : A simulation game on cultural clashes. Boston, MA: Intercultural Press.

    This is a good resource to use in diverse environments. The games are designed to lead participants to think deeper about the experiences of others in a diverse society.

    •    Turner, C., Garcia, M., Nora, A., & Rendón, L.I. (1996). Racial & ethnic diversity in higher education. Needham Heights, MA: Simon & Schuster Custom Publishing.
        
    This book contains a section called “Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning” that addresses topics such as use of language, racism in the classroom, identity development, and empowering students. There are also sections on the history of racial/ethnic diversity in higher education, student reactions, and research issues.

    •    Wlodkowski, R. J. & Ginsberg, M.B. (1995). Diversity and motivation: Culturally responsive teaching. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

    This book provides information about teaching inclusively at the college level with strategies for helping students from diverse backgrounds succeed. Also available in Second Edition.

    •    Zúñiga, X. & Chesler, M.A. (1995). Teaching with and about conflict in the classroom. In Schoem, D., Frankel, L., Zúñiga, X., & Lewis, E.A. (Eds.), Multicultural Teaching in the University (pp. 37-50). Westport, CT: Praeger.

    This chapter examines a course on conflict and social change that was taught at the University of Michigan. It provides ideas for conflict exercises and discussion techniques, as how to transform moments of conflict and tension into valuable learning experiences.

    Web Resources

    •    Association of American Colleges and Universities Diversity Web. View online
       
    This site contains articles and resources that help faculty and staff create inclusive classrooms. It also has useful links to other websites and articles about teaching for diversity.

    •    Davis, B.G. (1999). Diversity and complexity in the classroom: Considerations of race, ethnicity, and gender. University of California, Berkeley. From Tools for Teaching, copyright by Jossey-Bass.

    This article provides strategies for creating an inclusive classroom by removing stereotypes and bias. It has specific advice for creating equitable class discussions. There is also information on curriculum, assessment, and advising.  

    •    Tolerance.org 

    This site contains useful information about biased language.

    •    Warren, L. (2000). Managing hot moments in the classroom. Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, Harvard University. View online


    This article has helpful advice for handling classroom conflict that may arise as a result of diversity. It also provides resources for further information.

    Curriculum Development Resources for Inclusive Teaching

    •    Adams, M., Bell, L.A., & Griffin, P. (2007). Teaching for diversity and social justice. New York: Routledge.

    This book is clear in its approach to curriculum and breaks curriculum design down into categories such as racism, sexism, heterosexism, religious oppression, anti-Semitism,
    classism, ableism, ageism. It also has information for designing social justice education courses. This book comes with a CD-ROM and a companion book is available, called Reading for Diversity and Social Justice.

    •    Branche, J., Mullennix, J., & Cohn, E.R. (2007). Diversity across the curriculum: A guide for faculty in higher education. Bolton, MA: Anker Pub. Co.

    This book uses a series of vignettes to show how teachers from a variety of disciplines create culturally competent courses. It also has information on assessment and how to design a culturally inclusive syllabus.

    •    Gurung, R.A.R. & Prieto, L.R. (Eds.). (2009) Getting culture: Incorporating diversity across the curriculum. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

    A variety of topics related to diversity are discussed in this book and recommended for integration into the curriculum. These include stereotypes, prejudice, experiential learning, global competence, assignment suggestions, and more.

    •    Morey, A.I. & Kitano, M.K. (Eds.). (1997). Multicultural course transformation in higher education. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

    This book provides information about how to make courses more inclusive. It offers suggestions for crafting syllabi, instructional strategies, assessment, and discipline specific advice (such as for mathematics, sciences, humanities, economics, teacher education, and nursing).

    •    Ouellett, M. L. (2005). Teaching inclusively: Resources for course, department, and institutional change in higher education. Stillwater, OK: New Forums Press.

    Ouellett examines how various colleges and universities integrate multicultural ideals into their curriculums. There is also a helpful Best Practices section with graphic organizers for creating inclusive/multicultural curriculum.  

    •    Pascarella, E.T., Palmer, B., Moye, M., & Pierson, C.T. (2001). Do diversity experiences influence the development of critical thinking? Journal of College Student Development, 42(3) 257-271.

    Provided in this article are research-based explanations for why it is beneficial for all students to be exposed to and engaged with issues diversity. This article offers advice for enhancing curriculum to include more diversity experience for students.

    Resources for Faculty Diversity

    •    Gerschick, T.A. (1995). Can and should a white, heterosexual, middle-class man teach students about social inequality and oppression? One person’s experience and reflections. In Schoem, D., Frankel, L., Zúñiga, X., & Lewis, E.A. (Eds.), Multicultural teaching in the university (pp. 200-207). Wesport, CT: Praeger.

    This chapter provides advice for faculty teaching about oppression and social issues that do not directly impact them on a daily basis. The author presents his experience of student reactions to this issue, as well as ways to deal with trust, credibility, and legitimacy as a member of a majority group teaching about minority group concerns.

    •    Hendrix, K.G. (2007). Neither white nor male: Female faculty of color. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    This book addresses the unique issues faced by faculty who are both female and from a minority group. It contains articles about topics such as cross-cultural teaching, language barriers, feminism, and student interactions.

    •    Oullett, M.L. & Fraser, E. (2005). Teaching together: Interracial teams. In Ouellett, M. L. (Ed.), Teaching inclusively: Resources for course, department, and institutional change in higher education (pp. 189-210). Stillwater, OK: New Forums Press.

    This chapter examines courses that were co-taught by interracial faculty teams. It addresses the benefits of this approach, how the courses were designed, how the teams were selected, and strategies for successful results.

    •    Phillips, R. (2002). Recruiting and retaining a diverse faculty. Planning for Higher Education, 30(4) 32-39.

    This article looks at problems faced by minority and women faculty members at universities throughout the country. It also provides recommendations for how to overcome these
    challenges.

    •    Ryan, J. & Sackrey, C. (1996). Strangers in paradise: Academics from the working class. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, Inc.

    This book provides insight into the experiences of college professors from working class backgrounds. It contains personal anecdotes as well as theoretical information on topics such as higher education in the U.S., class mobility, and college statistics by class.

    •    Stanley, C.A. (2006). Faculty of color: Teaching in predominantly white colleges and universities. Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing Company, Inc.

    This book presents the personal accounts of faculty of color teaching in predominantly white colleges and universities. It also includes information on topics such as research, administration, campus life, and recruitment, along with recommendations for institutional change.

    •    Turner, C., Garcia, M., Nora, A., & Rendón, L.I. (1996). Racial & ethnic diversity in higher education. Needham Heights, MA: Simon & Schuster Custom Publishing.

    There is a section on faculty that addresses issues minority faculty members face, affirmative action, racism, faculty responsibility, issues women face as faculty members, and research on the topic.

    Inclusive Teaching Resources for Religious Diversity in the Classroom


    Print Resources

    •    Archer, L. (2002). Change, culture and tradition: British Muslim pupils talk about Muslim girls’ post-16 ‘choices.’ Race, Ethnicity and Education, 5(4), 359-418. 

    This article addresses how educational choices are influenced by religion for Muslim women. It uses data from a study in Britain to detail the gender restrictions placed on the educational opportunities for Muslim women living in western cultures.

    •    Esposito, J. (2003). The Oxford dictionary of Islam. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    This dictionary provides detailed entries about important Islamic ideas, such as concepts, people, and events. Its entries are focused on modern forms of Islam. There is also a “chronology of key events,” as well as biographies of important people.

    •    Johnson, B.T. & O’Grady, C.R. (2006). The spirit of service: Exploring faith, service, and social justice in higher education. Bolton, MA: Anchor Publishing Company.

    This book looks at the roles of faith, service, and social justice in higher education. It contains three sections which define and discuss the issues, show what they look like in practice, and delve deeper into suggestions for the future.

    •    Kurien, P.A. (2005). Being Young, Brown, and Hindu: The Identity Struggles of Second-Generation Indian Americans. Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, 34(4), 434-469. 

    This article examines the religious and racial identity struggles of young Indian-Americans. It also contains information about how immigration relates to these struggles. The article shows how the Hindu religion influences Indian-Americans.

    •    Meacham, J. (2009). Effective teaching to counter misinformation and negative stereotypes: The example of Islam. AAC&U Peer Review, 11(2), 13-16.
        
    This article provides advice for helping students to overcome stereotypes and be better informed consumers of knowledge. It provides several useful suggestions for countering misinformation and stereotypes, such as through approaching the topic carefully.

    Web Resources

    •    Interfaith Calendar: Use this website to keep updated about the holidays of the world’s
    major religions.  From the main page, select the year you would like to view. Holiday titles in
    bold are the most important to consider.