•  Inclusive Teaching Resources by Population

    African American
    American Indian
    English language learners
    First-generation college students and social class
    Hmong
    International
    Latino/a
    LGBT
    Majority groups
    Non-traditional students
    Somali
    Students with disabilities
    Women of all colors

    Resources for Inclusive Teaching of African American Students

    • Allen, W.R., Epps, E.G., & Haniff, N.Z. (1991). College in black and white: African American students in predominantly white and historically black public universities. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.
    This book contains four main sections: “Orienting perspectives to the study of black students in U.S. higher education,” research findings about the undergraduate years, research findings about the graduate and professional years, and practical issues on the topic. The book describes historical access to and quality of higher education for African American students, and what can be done to increase equity.
    • Byrd, A.X. (2006). Prequel to civic engagement: An African American studies research seminar. Diversity Digest, 10(1), 4-5. View online >
    This article outlines the structure and goals of a successful African American studies research seminar. It serves as an example of how inclusive teaching and civic engagement can be integrated with one another.
    • Cuyjet, M.J. (Ed.). (2006). African American men in college. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
    The sections of this book are “Issues and Ideas” and “Profiles of Some Successful Programs.” Its chapters look at issues such as campus climate, academics, and mentoring. The book also includes chapters describing successful programs at various universities. *Coming soon to Bush Library*

    •    Haymes, S.N. (1995). Race, culture, and the city: A pedagogy for black urban struggle. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

    This book provides a portrait of the dynamics between black and white culture in urban areas. It uses theory and analysis to explain how dominant white culture’s detrimental effects on black culture. This book also offers advice for how education can be used to revive black urban culture.

    Resources for Inclusive Teaching of American Indian Students

    •    American Indian Law: This page helps with conducting research related to American Indian law. It contains sections on American Indian affairs, treaties, the Supreme Court of the Navajo Nation, and the UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
    •    Fleming, W.C. (2007). Getting past our myths and stereotypes about Native Americans. The Education Digest, 72(7), 51-57. Click here for link to article (log in with Hamline ID).

    This article explains how to be culturally responsive to American Indian students. The article presents cultural myths about American Indians and how to overcome them in the classroom.

     

    Resources for Inclusive Teaching of English Language Learners

    •    Arthur, J. (2004). Language at the margins: The case of Somali in Liverpool. Language Problems & Language Planning, 28(3), 217-240. Click here for link to article (log in with Hamline ID).

    This is information based on the language attitudes of the Somali population of Liverpool, England. It provides a useful account of how living in a predominantly English area affects Somalis, as well as advice for helping to create a more multilingual environment.

    •    Delpit, L. (1992). Acquisition of literate discourse: Bowing before the master? Theory into Practice, 31(4), 296-302. View online >

    This article describes how students may be negatively perceived in higher education as a result of their native language or preferred methods of communication. The article also offers advice for helping these students succeed while still honoring their native cultures.

    •    Ernst-Slavit, G., Moore, M., & Maloney, C. (2002). Changing lives: Teaching English and literature to ESL students. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 46(2), 116-128. Click here for link to article (log in with Hamline ID).

    This article provides advice for helping English Language Learners succeed in literature courses. It offers background information about ELL students, effective practices for helping these students become more successful readers, models for ELL education, cultural information, and information on fluency development.

    •    Kinsella, K. (1997). Creating an enabling learning environment for non-native speakers of English. In Morey, A.I. & Kitano, M.K. (Eds.), Multicultural course transformation in higher education (pp. 104-125). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

    This chapter helps faculty understand the diverse types of English Language Learners appropriate strategies to help these students get the most out of the course. The chapter provides information on topics such as strategies that aid understanding, appropriate lesson design, and enabling more equitable class discussions.

    Resources for Inclusive Teaching of First-Generation College Students and Social Class

    •    Gilbert, R. (2008). Raising awareness of class privilege among students. Diversity & Democracy, 11(3), 7-9. View online >

    This article is part of an issue of Diversity & Democracy devoted to issues of class and civic engagement. It provides advice for successfully addressing social class in the classroom and helping students to learn about privilege. This article also contains helpful “resources for teaching about class and classism.”

    •    Pascarella, E.T., Pierson, C.T., Wolniak, G.C., & Terenzini, P.T. (2004). First-generation college students: Additional evidence on college experiences and outcomes. The Journal of Higher Education, 75(3), 249-284. Click here for link to article (log in with Hamline ID).

    The study presented by this article shows ways in which first-generation college students are at a disadvantage in higher education when compared to students whose parents completed college. It examines differences in college experiences and outcomes, as well as the long-term effects of these differences.

    •    Pflugfelder, E.H. (2008). Finding context: Teaching about class through local history. Diversity & Democracy, 11(3), 16-17. View online >

    This article provides advice for combining community engagement with issues of class. The author details an example of increasing class awareness among students by engaging them in local history through field trips, peer poll assignments, reading outsider critics, and oral histories.

    •    Scala, A.H. & Levitan, J. (2000). Reality based methods for teaching issues of class and privilege. Transformations, 11(1), 65-72. Click here for link to article (log in with Hamline ID).

    Scala and Levitan provide ideas for how to incorporate the concerns of first generation and working class students into the classroom. This article also examines issues of race, class, and gender and how these issues affect first generation and working class students.

    Resources for Inclusive Teaching of Hmong Students

    •    Faderman, L. & Xiong, G. (1998). I begin my life all over: The Hmong and the American immigrant experience. Boston: Beacon Press.

    This book contains accounts of Hmong immigrants assimilating into American culture. It is a useful tool for determining the differences between the two cultures and the difficulties Hmong students may face.

    •    Kilman, C. (2005). Crossing borders/border crossings. Teaching Tolerance, Fall 2005, 26-30. View online >

    Kilman offers ideas for teaching Hmong students and topics such as identity, bias, and inclusive teaching. There are also suggestions for helping English language learners, as well as a section with “tips for teachers.”

    •    Miller, M. (1996). Hard luck: There’s a flip side to the Asian-American success story. Far Eastern Economic Review, 159(50), 34-36. See Hamline Bush Periodicals.

    This article describes how many people, even those with high levels of education, frequently stereotype Asian-Americans as prosperous and privileged. The article provides evidence to describe the challenges many Asian-Americans face.

    •    Timm, J.T. (1994). Hmong values and American education. Equity & Excellence in Education, 27(2), 36-44. See Hamline Bush Periodicals.

    This is a good overview of how Hmong-Americans view education. It provides information about Hmong culture, gender roles, attitudes toward education, and bilingual issues. The article also describes the type of teaching Hmong students are used to and gives advice for helping them to get the most out of the educational system.

    •    Watson, D. (2001). Characteristics of Hmong immigrant students. Childhood Education, 77(5), 303. View online >

    This article provides advice for learning about the Hmong way of life and integrating it into the way education is structured. The article uses examples of how this has been done at Hancock/Hamline University Collaborative Magnet School.

    See also: Resources for Inclusive Teaching of English Language Learners

    Resources for Inclusive Teaching of International Students

    • Kim, S. (2008). Teaching international students across the curriculum: Supporting academic listening/speaking. View online >
    This web page addresses the unique issues international students face regarding classroom participation. It also provides research findings as well as advice for enhancing comprehension and encouraging active participation of international students.

    Resources for Inclusive Teaching of Latino/a Students

    •    Martinez, Y. (1998). Stay in school! Hispanic, 11(3), 30-31. Click here for link to article (log in with Hamline ID).

    This article looks at the historically high dropout rate of Latino/a students, examines the reasons for this, and offers advice for encouraging these students to continue their education. The article focuses mostly on high school students, but much of the advice is transferable to higher education.

    •    Moya-Raggio, E. (1995). The Latina: A teaching experience. In Schoem, D., Frankel, L., Zúñiga, X., & Lewis, E.A. (Eds.), Multicultural teaching in the university (pp. 119-132). Wesport, CT: Praeger.

    This chapter provides an account of a course the author offered on ethnicity and gender, called “The Latina.” The chapter contains useful information about various Latina identities, as well as specific texts to examine.

    Resources for Inclusive Teaching of LGBT Students

    •    DiPietro, M. (2005). Inclusive teaching for our queer students: A workshop. In Ouellett, M. L. (Ed.), Teaching inclusively: Resources for course, department, and institutional change in higher education (pp. 631-643). Stillwater, OK: New Forums Press.

    This chapter offers information to help faculty become more culturally responsive to LGBT concerns. It provides ways to integrate these issues and avoid marginalization, as well as specific suggestions for addressing LGBT issues in various academic disciplines.

    •    Edwards, B.L., Myers, P., & Toy, J. (1995). Combating homophobia through education. In Schoem, D., Frankel, L., Zúñiga, X., & Lewis, E.A. (Eds.), Multicultural teaching in the university (pp. 249-259). Wesport, CT: Praeger.

    By examining the role of the LGBT population in society as a whole, the Lesbian-Gay Male Programs Office at the University of Michigan provides advice for educating the public on issues affecting the LGBT community. It also provides information on successful outreach techniques and exercise to combat homophobic attitudes.

    •    Lopez, G., and Chism, N. (1993). Classroom concerns of gay and lesbian students: The invisible minority. College Teaching, 41(3), 97-103. Click here for link to article (log in with Hamline ID).

    This article looks at classroom issues faced by LGBT students and ways for faculty to help. The article examines topics such as identity, coming out, labels and curriculum. There are also ten helpful “recommendations for teachers.”

    •    Myers, P. (1995). Lesbian studies and multicultural teaching: A challenge in diversity. In Schoem, D., Frankel, L., Zúñiga, X., & Lewis, E.A. (Eds.), Multicultural teaching in the university (pp. 133-146). Wesport, CT: Praeger.

    The author of this chapter tells of her successful experience teaching an undergraduate lesbian studies course to students at the University of Michigan. The chapter describes the course readings, assignments, and experimental activities that led students to gain a greater appreciation of lesbian studies issues and topics.

    Resources for Inclusive Teaching of Majority Groups

    •    Goodman, D.J. (2001). Promoting diversity and social justice: Educating people from privileged groups. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

    This book offers useful advice for helping majority groups to overcome their resistance to recognizing themselves as privileged so that they will be able to change their viewpoints and actions to help break the cycle of oppression. Chapter 9 specifically addresses issues for educators.

    Resources for Inclusive Teaching of Non-traditional Students

    •    Barrington, E. (2004). Teaching to student diversity in higher education: How Multiple Intelligence theory can help. Teaching in Higher Education, 9(4), 421-434. Click here for link to article (log in with Hamline ID).

    This article describes how Multiple Intelligence Theory is an inclusive pedagogy and can be can be used as a tool in the classroom. The article also describes how Multiple Intelligence Theory relates to nontraditional student diversity in higher education.

    •    Bowe, F.G. (2000). Universal design in education: Teaching nontraditional students. Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey.

    This book provides a tip sheet for Universally Designed teaching, information on how Universal Design works with diverse students in general, and how to implement Universal Design in colleges and universities as well as for adult education. There are sections specific to higher education, older students, and learning styles. *Coming soon to Bush Library*

    Resources for Inclusive Teaching of Somali Students


    Print Resources

    •    Archer, L. (2002). Change, culture and tradition: British Muslim pupils talk about Muslim girls’ post-16 ‘choices.’ Race, Ethnicity and Education, 5(4), 359-418. Click here for link to article (log in with Hamline ID).

    This article addresses how educational choices are influenced by religion for Muslim women. It uses data from a study in Britain to detail the gender restrictions placed on the educational opportunities for Muslim women living in western cultures.

    •    Arthur, J. (2004). Language at the margins: The case of Somali in Liverpool. Language Problems & Language Planning, 28(3), 217-240. Click here for link to article (log in with Hamline ID).

    This is information based on the language attitudes of the Somali population of Liverpool, England. It provides a useful account of how living in a predominantly English area affects Somalis, as well as advice for helping to create a more multilingual environment.

    •    Basford, L. (2008). From mainstream to East African charter: East African Muslim students’ experiences in U.S. schools (Doctoral dissertation, University of Minnesota, 2008). View online >

    Basford presents a study of the effects of mainstream U.S. schools on East African Muslim students. This provides a good portrait of how mainstream U.S. schools can negatively affect East African Muslim students, such as through cultural and religious discrimination.

    •    Esposito, J. (2003). The Oxford dictionary of Islam. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    This dictionary provides detailed entries about important Islamic ideas, such as concepts, people, and events. Its entries are focused on modern forms of Islam. There is also a “chronology of key events,” as well as biographies of important people.

    Web Resources

    •    Lewis, T. (1996). Somali cultural profile. View online >

    This website contains useful information about the culture, traditions, and practices of Somalis. It describes aspects of culture such as interpersonal relationships, religious beliefs, and community structure. It is also a good resource for information about Muslim culture.

    See also: Resources for Inclusive Teaching of English Language Learners

    Resources for Inclusive Teaching of Students with Disabilities


    Print Resources

    • Bowe, F.G. (2000). Universal design in education: Teaching nontraditional students. Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey.

    This book is a good overview for interacting with students with disabilities. It provides a tip sheet for Universally Designed teaching, information on how Universal Design works with diverse students in general, and how to implement Universal Design in colleges and universities as well as for adult education. *Coming soon to Bush Library*
    • Burgstahler, S. (2005). Faculty development and students with disabilities: Accommodations and universal design. In Ouellett, M.L. (Ed.), Teaching inclusively: Resources for course, department & institutional change in higher education (pp. 393-404). Stillwater, OK: New Forums Press.
    This chapter in Teaching Inclusively focuses on how faculty can make appropriate accommodations for students with disabilities such as visual impairments, hearing impairments, learning disabilities, mobility impairments, and health impairments. It also provides suggestions for universal design of class resources and syllabi in ways that benefits all students.
    • Higbee, J.L (Ed.). (2003). Curriculum transformation and disability: Implementing universal design in higher education. Minneapolis, MN: Center for Research in Developmental Education and Urban Literacy, General College, University of Minnesota. View online >
    This is a compilation of essays that provides advice for faculty for not just accommodating students with disabilities, but including them in classroom activities and events. This book describes how faculty can use Universal Design and Universal Instructional Design to make their teaching more meaningful and inclusive for students with disabilities.
    • McCune, P. (2001). What do disabilities have to do with diversity? About Campus, 6(2) 5-12. Click here for link to article (log in with Hamline ID).
    This article provides good reasoning for including disabilities in the teaching of diversity issues and shows how students with disabilities have remarkably similar experiences as students in other cultural minority groups.

     

    Web Resources

    • Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology. (2004). The Faculty Room. Seattle. View online >
    This web page is for faculty and administrators and contains information about inclusive teaching of students with disabilities. It also provides links to several relevant resources, as well as a searchable database.
    • Disability Awareness Guide: View online >
    This informational guide also provides suggestions for improving access and advice for positive interactions with people who have disabilities. It is broken down by type of disability to make finding specific information easier. Sections include blindness, hearing impaired, learning disabilities, mental illness, and mobility impairments.
    •    Teachability Project (2005). University of Strathclyde. View online >

    This web page is part of a disability awareness project in the UK and contains information useful for all academic faculty and staff. Through an easily navigable site, it provides detailed descriptions of how to create greater accessibility in all aspects of higher education.

    Resources for Inclusive Teaching of Women of All Colors


    Print Resources

    • Achieving gender equality in science classrooms: A guide for faculty. (1996). Published by the Office of the Dean of the College at Brown University, Funded by The New England Consortium for Undergraduate Science Education (NECUSE). View online >
    This is a useful resource for teaching science to women in higher education. It contains information about learning styles, advice for overcoming stereotypes, and how to encourage women in the science classroom.
    •    Archer, L. (2002). Change, culture and tradition: British Muslim pupils talk about Muslim girls’ post-16 ‘choices.’ Race, Ethnicity and Education, 5(4), 359-418. Click here for link to article (log in with Hamline ID).

    This article addresses how educational choices are influenced by religion for Muslim women. It uses data from a study in Britain to detail the gender restrictions placed on the educational opportunities for Muslim women living in western cultures.
    • Digeorgio-Lutz, J. (2002). Women in higher education: Empowering change. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers.
    This book contains articles from various contributors about issues women face in higher education. It has sections on gender and pedagogy, suggested texts for curriculum, women scientists and engineers, and evaluating gender equity in higher education. *Coming soon to Bush Library*
    • Frankel, L. (1995). “A circle of learners”: Teaching about race, gender, and class. In Schoem, D., Frankel, L., Zúñiga, X., & Lewis, E.A. (Eds.), Multicultural teaching in the university (pp. 95-109). Wesport, CT: Praeger.
    Frankel primarily examines how gender, race, and class identities intersect in the classroom and how to provide inclusive teaching for these students. She also provides curriculum suggestions, such as ideas for assignments and projects. It also contains sections on gender and race conflicts in the classroom.
    • Laurer, C. & Glennon, L.M. (2005). Mainstreaming feminist perspectives. In Ouellett, M. L. (Ed.), Teaching inclusively: Resources for course, department, and institutional change in higher education (pp. 382-392). Stillwater, OK: New Forums Press.
    This chapter provides information on methods of integrating feminist perspectives throughout the entire curriculum, not just in certain courses. It provides an account of a workshop designed to help faculty in departments other than women’s studies to use feminist perspectives in their classrooms.
    • Mayberry, M. & Welling, L. (2000). Toward developing a feminist science curriculum: A transdisciplinary approach to feminist earth science education. Transformations, 11(1), 1-16. Click here for link to article (log in with Hamline ID).
    This article examines how to use feminist perspectives to enhance an earth science curriculum.  It looks at the political issues surrounding feminist contributions to earth science and how to overcome these concerns.
    • Moya-Raggio, E. (1995). The Latina: A teaching experience. In Schoem, D., Frankel, L., Zúñiga, X., & Lewis, E.A. (Eds.), Multicultural teaching in the university (pp. 119-132). Wesport, CT: Praeger.
    This chapter provides an account of a course the author offered on ethnicity and gender, called “The Latina.” The chapter contains useful information about various Latina identities, as well as specific texts to examine.

     

    Web Resources

    • On Campus with Women. Online newsletter. View online >
    This newsletter provides useful information about inclusive pedagogy as it relates to women in higher education. There is also information on campus climate, research, and women as faculty members.