• Career Development Center

  • Faculty Internship Guide

    The purpose of this guide is to provide information and assistance to Hamline faculty in their role as faculty supervisors of student interns. This role is essential to ensuring an academically sound internship program. 

    The Internship Program adds to the Hamline curriculum by allowing students to apply the learning they have been doing in the classroom and prepare for their lives beyond graduation.

    Internships are also beneficial for faculty because they help connect them with employers, community resources and expand their knowledge of various fields. Internships also help faculty demonstrate the connections between a liberal arts education and the world of work. 
     

    Topics:  

    Importance of the Internship Program
    Goals of the Internship Program
    The Role of the Faculty Supervisor
    The Role of the Site Supervisor
    The Role of the Student Intern
    The Role of the Career Development Center
    LEAD Learning Agreement Purpose and Philosophy
    Tips for Faculty to Help Students Complete the LEAD Learning Agreement
    Internship Evaluation and Grading 

     

    Importance of the Internship Program

    One of the distinguishing features of a Hamline internship is the LEAD component that requires students to establish personal learning goals and articulate the connections between their academic studies and the internship. Students work closely with a faculty supervisor and a site supervisor to complete this academic requirement by completing a LEAD Learning Agreement as well as a Two-Week Review, a Midterm Evaluation and a Final Evaluation. 
     

    Goals of the Internship Program

    The internship program provides students with the opportunity to experience supervised, meaningful work in a professional setting. All internships require a minimum of 120 hours (150 hours for Legal Studies majors) of work at the internship site and the completion of academic work under the supervision of a full-time Hamline faculty member. By doing an internship, students gain LEAD credit (the Hamline Plan "W") which is required for graduation.

    The goals of the internship program are to:

    1. Provide students with an experience in a professional environment to expand their academic, professional and personal learning.
    2. Support students, university faculty, and site supervisors to:
      1. Increase students' academic competencies. Students will expand their knowledge of a professional field and enhance their ability to apply academic theory.
      2. Expand students' professional skills. Students will gain awareness of professional expectations in today's work environment and competence in Hamline Plan skill areas including oral and written communication, computer and technical competence, problem solving and decision-making, teamwork, and interpersonal and cultural competencies
      3. Encourage students' personal development. Students will gain clarity in their academic and career directions, identify personal values, assess developmental needs, and attain a greater sense of responsibility. 

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    The Role of the Faculty Supervisor  

    The faculty supervisor is a current, full-time Hamline faculty member who has an interest in, and some knowledge of, the intern's field of work. The faculty supervisor structures the academic component of the internship by helping the intern complete the LEAD Learning Agreement, providing guidance, feedback, and encouraging reflection, maintaining contact with the site supervisor at the time of the Two-Week Review, the Midterm Evaluation, and the Final Evaluation, and evaluating the intern’s growth and submitting the final grade to the registrar's office at the conclusion of the term.  

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    The Role of Site Supervisor

    Interns are supervised by a professional staff person at the internship site who has expertise in the intern's work area. The supervisor becomes a mentor/teacher responsible for orienting and training the intern as well as guiding and evaluating his or her work. Supervising requires taking time to discuss the intern's work, providing background information and resources, giving coaching and feedback, and providing opportunities for new learning. The site supervisor also maintains contact with the faculty supervisor at least three times during the internship through the evaluations to discuss the intern's learning objectives, the intern's progress and performance, and any problems that arise. 

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    The Role of the Student Intern

    The student intern is responsible for securing an internship, constructing learning objectives in consultation with site and faculty supervisors, arranging scheduled meeting dates with both site and faculty supervisors, (recorded on the LEAD Learning Agreement), meeting the reasonable work expectations of the employer, completing the identified academic and reflective work as agreed, establishing the schedule for the Two-Week Review, the Midterm Evaluation and the Final Evaluation and returning them to the CDC on time. 

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    The Role of the Career Development Center

    The CDC believes that the search and application process is an important element of the internship learning experience. The CDC maintains a large number of current internship postings, a database of alumni available for networking, as well as various other search resources for the intern.

    The Internship Program Director provides guidance and support to students through the internship search and registration process. The Internship Program Director also assists students, faculty and employers with internship policy and questions.

    Students must register their internships and obtain the necessary paperwork at the CDC. All paperwork must be turned in to the CDC where its completion is approved by the Internship Program Director. The CDC retains original copies of students’ internship paperwork and disseminates additional copies to Student Administrative Services, the faculty supervisor and the student intern. The Internship Program Director also sends an email or letter to the site supervisor to confirm that the internship has been approved. 

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    The LEAD Learning Agreement Purpose and Philosophy

    The LEAD Learning Agreement (LLA) is a document that identifies what the student plans to learn, the steps he or she will take to accomplish that learning, the evidence he or she will present to demonstrate it, completion dates that detail when it will be accomplished, and the meeting dates for students with faculty and site supervisors. The purpose of the LLA is to clarify the educational goals and purposes of the internship and to ensure that those who are principally involved understand them.

    Students are responsible for completing the LLA (they take the leadership role) but can do so only after consulting with their faculty and site supervisors. Faculty may have specific objectives to include, but students should be responsible for creating learning goals that reflect their particular development needs and academic interests. In writing the LLA, the student will, in effect, create the syllabus for a course. A significant value of the LLA lies in the dialogue it fosters among the student, site and faculty supervisors about the purpose and intentions of the internship. In taking responsibility for creating the LLA, students practice with a model they can use for life-long learning. 

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    Tips for Faculty to Help Students Complete the LEAD Learning Agreement

    There are three categories of Learning Objectives that students must complete on the LEAD Learning Agreement: Academic, Professional and Personal. The student should develop two learning objectives for each of the three categories. These categories are defined as follows:

    1. Academic Learning: What questions surface as a result of this internship that prompt additional research/study? How can past academic learning be applied? The topics to be studied may coincide with the work assignment or they may be less directly related.

    2. Professional Skills Learning: What important professional skills might this particular intern work on? These include any of the Hamline Plan areas, such as oral communication, working with diversity, critical thinking and problem solving, computer skills, and team work. This section also includes research skills, ethical standards, and protocol appropriate to the intern's unique profession or position.

    3. Personal Development Learning: What personal behaviors and attitudes might be important in this internship? Which are key for this particular intern to work on? What are the intern's personal values and beliefs, and how do they relate to this internship and or to his or her future work? What clarity does the intern seek in career and academic directions?

    Students must also articulate their learning plan for each of their objectives, as well as proposed evidence of learning and completion dates.

    Learning Plan: What are the steps a student might take to achieve what he or she wants to learn? Students often think that learning happens automatically. Helping students be intentional about the things they will do to achieve their learning develops strategies for life-long learning.

    Reflection is a part of every LEAD experience and should be included in every student's plan. Some reflective activities might include: observe an expert and analyze what that person does; read books or articles; watch a video, speak another language; participate in a protest; research; write; ask for and receive feedback, discuss; draw-up and administer a survey; facilitate a focus group; teach a class; lead a discussion; complete experiments; attend a training event; attend a presentation; listen carefully; attend a play, prepare a list; ask for clarification; compare and contrast; identify personal skills, values and goals.

    Evidence of Learning: How will the student show he or she learned what he or she wanted to learn? How will you know he or she has learned it? Some possibilities: a research paper; a reflective journal; an op-ed piece; a presentation; a children's book; a project proposal, a portfolio or completed work, a musical composition; a play; a painting or other art work; a written policy statement; a developed workshop, seminar or training program; poetry; a performance; an annotated bibliography; a short story; lesson plans; a documentary; a travelogue; the supervisor's final evaluation; abstracts; a web page; a letter of reference; a completed organization chart with an analysis of power distribution; a case study.

    Completion Date: When will students bring in their evidence? Students make a timeline by estimating completion dates for the steps of their learning plan. Faculty and students determine which of these should be submitted. The final product summarizes work throughout the course of the internship. See sample LEAD Learning Objectives.

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    Internship Evaluation and Grading

    By default, all internships are graded on a scale of No-Pass to High Pass. The faculty supervisor will not directly observe much of the intern's performance and must share aspects of the evaluation responsibility with the student and the site supervisor. What is the final grade of High Pass (HP), Pass (P), or No Pass (NP) based on? At a minimum, faculty should consider the following:

    • Has the student fulfilled the 120 hours minimum requirement? (fewer than 120 hours would result in NP. However, surpassing the 120 hours doesn't raise the evaluation to an HP)
    • What does the site supervisor say about student learning and performance in the Midterm and Final Evaluation? These documents as well as communications through the semester give faculty an understanding of the student's learning from another valuable perspective.
    • What is the level of learning demonstrated by the student as agreed in the LEAD Learning Agreement? As in other classes, the final grade is based on the learning of the student.

    When completing the LEAD Learning Agreement, there is a section where students may request that their faculty supervisors grade their internship on an A-F grading scale. The faculty supervisor has the authority to determine whether or not to assign a letter grade to the internship. In the event that a faculty member agrees to assign a letter grade, it is important to establish and share with the student guidelines that would define an A, B, C, D, or F grade. The decision to offer the option for a letter grade for internships was based at least in part on the fact that some graduate school programs, particularly law schools, take a "pass" grade and average it into the student's cumulative GPA as a "C." The faculty supervisor is under no obligation to agree to a letter grade scale.

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  • Student Success Story
    Matt_Peterson

    Matt Petersen '12  

    With the guidance of the Career Development Center, Matt began extensive networking and self-promotion involving...