• Joint Degrees

    Save Time and Money While Expanding Your Marketability

    Combining a JD with a master’s degree specific to your professional goals or industry can increase your expertise and your value to potential employers. You can earn your JD and your master’s degree in four years – saving time and money over pursuing the degrees independently of one another. Through our partnership with Hamline’s outstanding graduate programs, you can combine your JD with:

    Interested? You can apply for any of the joint degrees after completing your first year at Hamline Law with a minimum GPA of 2.5. Applications are available in the registrar's office.

    *The master’s degrees are offered through the Hamline School of Business and require you to apply and be accepted in both Hamline Law and Hamline Business.

    Joint Degree Credits

    • Earn up to 9 credits toward your JD by taking MBA, MFA, MPA, MNM, or MAOL courses, provided a grade of "B" or better is earned
    • Graduate courses must be pre-approved by the associate dean of the law school
    • A 4-credit graduate school course transfers as 3 law school credits
    • Grades earned in graduate school courses are not computed into the law school GPA
    • Joint degree credits cannot be applied to residency requirements for students who transfer to Hamline
    • Tuition for joint degree courses is paid out of law school tuition by the law school

    Explore your interests through graduate-level JD electives

    If a full-fledge joint degree is more than you want, you can take graduate courses in your area of interest as electives toward your JD requirements, within the following guidelines:

    • Take up to 8 graduate school credits, which transfer as 6 law school credits (a 4-credit graduate school course transfers as 3 law school credits)
    • Choose courses from the core graduate school curriculum
    • Get your courses pre-approved by the associate dean
    • Register for graduate school classes only through the law school

    Grades earned in graduate school courses are not computed into the law school GPA