Vogel,-Howard

Howard Vogel

Emeritus Professor
Email: hvogel@hamline.edu
Phone: 

 

BA, University of Minnesota
JD, University of Minnesota
MA, United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities

 


 

"Law is artwork in pursuit of justice, performed by lawyers in a social context, through the craft of counseling and advocacy. If it is to be practiced elegantly, it requires mastery and compassion." 

  Professor Howard Vogel was named emeritus professor after retiring from teaching at Hamline Law. As a professor, Vogel was known for not only teaching the principles of law, but also for helping students learn how to think seriously about their professional identity as lawyers. Trained in both law and theology, Vogel's teaching and research was located at the intersection of law, religion, and ethics and focused on the possibilities of law to serve the common good in a diverse social and cultural context.  

Since retiring Professor Vogel continues to teach Restorative Justice in the Dispute Resolution Institute of the Law School and engage in research, writing and public speaking on various topics that are part of two on-going major research projects.   

The first of these projects is entitled Law-As-Process-With-A-Purpose: The Possibilities of Law as Love-In-Action Seeking Beauty — Essays on the Promise of Law and the Legal Profession to Serve the Common Good in the World We Share.  This project involves an exploration of the potential of the resources of process thought, with special attention to the process-relational philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead, to reframe our understanding of law, its study and practice, in a post-modern reconstructive paradigm that takes events rather than substance as the primary dimension of experience.  As such it departs from the dominance of the substance-based perspective of modern philosophy to embrace the possibilities of law-as-process with a purpose, namely to secure justice more widely shared within the community of life.  

The second of these projects is entitled Coming Home to Planet Earth: Making Peace with the Earth and Each Other in an Age of Ecological Crisis  - Essays on the Possibilities of Law for Social Healing in the World We ShareThis project involves an exploration of the potential of restorative justice practices and principles as a creative response to the legacy of ethnic cleansing and slavery in the United States. The dispossession of the indigenous peoples of their land which was then worked with slave labor based on the color-line have brought a legacy of trauma to both the victims and beneficiaries of these practices which is evident in a host of data about widespread social dislocation, dysfunction and injustice in the present day. This project explores the potential of restorative justice to address the full truth of that past with courage as a step toward the development of action aimed at creative transformation in the present so that all life may flourish.  

In 2014 Vogel received a Minnesota Historical Society Legacy Research Fellowship to study the role of Stephen R. Riggs at the 1851 Treaty of Traverse des Sioux.  Riggs was one of the early missionaries in Minnesota and he played a key role as a translator at the first of two 1851 treaty negotiations that opened 24 million acres of Dakota homeland to a flood of immigrant-settlers and the grant of Statehood to Minnesota in 1858. 

During his 37 years on the full-time faculty, Professor Vogel taught courses in constitutional law, restorative justice, international human rights, and a seminar in ethics exploring the lawyer's professional identity and responsibility within the context of the quest for integrity in the practice of law.  

Prior to joining the Hamline Law faculty in 1975, Vogel did extensive public interest litigation in environmental law and was a staff attorney with the Minnesota Public Interest Research Group. 

For more than twenty-five years, Vogel has been an active member of the Society of Christian Ethics, and he is co-founder of the Restorative Justice Interest Group of the Society. From 1989 to 2013, he served as one of the editors of the Journal of Law and Religion. 

In 2003, Vogel received the highest award given by the Hamline University Board of Trustees, the John Wesley Trustee Award for Faculty, for outstanding commitment to leadership and service. 

Vogel has taught in Budapest, Hungary, as a member of the faculty of the Hamline University School of Law Dispute  Resolution Institute summer program (2005), in Jerusalem, Israel, as a member of the faculty of the Hamline-Hebrew University summer program in law, religion, and ethics (1994 and 1995), as visiting professor in the Doctor of Ministry Summer Program at Emory University Theological Seminary (1986), and as visiting professor in the political science department of the University of Minnesota (1989-90 and 1996-97). He received his undergraduate and law degrees from the University of Minnesota, and his Master of Arts in Religious Studies from United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities. He was named a Distinguished Alumnus by United Theological Seminary in 2009. 

 

 

 

Publications


Rethinking the Effect of the Abrogation of the Dakota Treaties and the Authority for the Removal of the Dakota People from Their Homeland, 39 WM. MITCHELL L. REV. 538 (2013).
SSRN 

Remembering David Michael Cobin, 35 HAMLINE L. REV. 547 (2012).
 
Speaking of Law and Religion: "Why Law, Why Religion?" - A Conversation Between A Lawyer and A Theologian, 24 J.L. & RELIGION 365 (2009).
SSRN 

Healing the Trauma of America's Past: Restorative Justice, Honest Patriotism, and the Legacy of Ethnic Cleansing, 55 BUFF. L. REV. 981 (2007).
SSRN 

The “Ordered Liberty” of Substantive Due Process and the Future of Constitutional Law as a Rhetorical Art: Variations on a Theme from Justice Cardozo in the United States Supreme Court, 70 ALB. L. REV. 1473 (2007).
SSRN 

The Restorative Justice Wager: The Promise and Hope of A Value-Based, Dialogue-Driven Approach to Conflict Resolution for Social Healing, 8 CARDOZO J. CONFLICT RESOL. 565 (2007).
SSRN 

Reframing Rights from the Ground Up: The Contribution of the New U.N. Law of Self-Determination to Recovering the Principle of Sociability on the Way to a Relational Theory of International Human Rights for the 21st Century, 20 TEMP. INT’L & COMP. L.J. 443 (2006).
SSRN 

The Possibilities of American Constitutional Law in a Fractured World: A Relational Approach to Legal Hermeneutics, 83 U. DET. MERCY L. REV. 789 (2006).
SSRN 

African Americans and the Right to Self-Determination in a Christian Context, 22 J. SOC. CHRISTIAN ETHICS 201 (2002).
SSRN 

The Terrible Bind of the Lawyer in the Modern World: The Problem of Hope, the Question of Identity, and the Recovery of Meaning, 32 SETON HALL L. REV. 152 (2001).
SSRN 

The Clash of Stories at Chimney Rock: A Narrative Approach to Cultural Conflict over Native American Sacred Sites on Public Land, 41 SANTA CLARA L. REV. 757 (2001).
SSRN 

The Judicial Oath and the American Creed: Comments on Sanford Levinson's The Confrontation of Religious Faith and Civil Religion, 39 DEPAUL L. REV. 1107 (1990).
SSRN 

In the Cause of Justice: Reflections on Robert Cover's Turn Toward Narrative, 7 J.L. & RELIGION 173 (1989).
SSRN 

Welfare Rights and the Constitutional Ethic of Justice Thurgood Marshall, ANN’L SOC’Y CHRISTIAN ETHICS, 93 (A. Anderson ed., 1986).
SSRN 

Social Ethics as a Resource for Constitutional Adjudication, ANN’L SOC’Y CHRISTIAN ETHICS, 273 (L. Rasmussen ed., 1984).
SSRN 

Survey and Commentary on the New Literature in Law and Religion, 1 J. L. & RELIGION, 79 (1983).
SSRN 

The Wild Rice Mystique: Resource Management and American Indians' Rights as a Problem of Law and Culture, 10 WM. MITCHELL L. REV. 743 (1979). (with Charlene Smith).
SSRN 

The Case for Brain Death Legislation: A Response to the Critics, 62 MINN. MED. 121 (1979). (with William H. Manning).
SSRN