• Clinic Offerings

    Hamline Law currently offers the following clinics:

    Read about how to apply for these clinics.
    Learn about faculty who lead the clinics.

    Business Law Clinic

    Instructor: Kathy Davis Senseman and Emily Buchholz

    You work with practicing business and corporate lawyers to provide legal advice to eligible small business clients referred by community organizations. You may have the opportunity to work with clients in a variety of business law matters that affect the small business owner, including choice of business entity; drafting formation documents; contract drafting; corporate dissolution; lease negotiations; employment law matters; and non-profit incorporation.

    Pre-requisites: One of the following: Business Associations (HUSL), Business Organizations (WMCL), Unincorporated Business Entities (HUSL), or APLLC (WMCL)

    Pre- or Co-requisite: Professional Responsibility or Practice, Problem-Solving and Professional Responsibility (HUSL)

    Child Protection Clinic

    Instructor: Joanna Woolman

    Students will represent parents whose children have been removed from the home for one semester. The students will meet their clients at the initial hearing and will continue to represent their clients throughout the case, including a trial if necessary.

    The cases in this clinic will come from Ramsey County and all court appearances will be in Ramsey County on either Tuesday or Thursday mornings.

    Pre- or Co-requisite: Professional Responsibility or Practice, Problem-Solving and Professional Responsibility (HUSL)

    Civil Advocacy Clinic

    Instructor: Ann Juergens and Peter Knapp

    Students take full responsibility for representing clients. The course focuses on the challenges of representing real people against real opponents in an ethical, reflective, and creative way. Under close supervision of faculty, students interview and counsel clients, direct discovery and fact investigation, negotiate disputes, prepare trial memos and motions, conduct administrative hearings and district court trials, and, on occasion, write briefs and argue unemployment cases in the Court of Appeals. Cases cover a variety of subject areas, including landlord-tenant, unemployment compensation and employment, and consumer and welfare matters.

    Students meet weekly in seminar in addition to meeting individually with faculty for supervision of casework. Some required activities (such as court appearance, investigation and interviews) take place during normal business hours, but most students are able to combine this clinic’s work with their own employment and care-giving responsibilities.

    Pre-requisite: Advocacy*, Evidence

    Pre- or Co-requisite: Professional Responsibility or Practice, Problem-Solving and Professional Responsibility (HUSL)

    Community Development

    Instructor: Diane Dube

    Students in the Community Development Clinic tackle unstructured problems, work collaboratively in a multi-discipline arena, and learn how to identify and address legal issues embedded in a problem or project - necessary skills in the problem-solving profession. This clinic is designed for students with a curiosity about a wide variety of subjects and who are interested in transactional work, although client needs dictate the legal skills required. The work may be transactional, legislative or policy work, litigation, educational, or any combination of these. Students may be part of a long-term project (learning strategic thinking and planning) or a short-term project (handling a problem from beginning to end).

    Students work with individuals, non-profits or community groups, and rarely know in advance the legal issues they may encounter when the client or community asks for legal help. The Community Development Clinic addresses the challenging issues of neighborhood revitalization, equitable development, and community economic development using legal skills, reflective thinking, and creative problem-solving. In the past, students have worked on a range of Central Corridor LRT projects (such as small business assistance, the Community Summit, the Affordable Housing Partners Task Force) and community projects such as affordable business space, community gardens and the impact of foreclosures on neighborhoods. Clinic students have created brochures and given presentations on topics including business preparation for major construction, restorative justice, zoning and land use, property taxation and community benefits agreements. During the course of their work, students may work with area attorneys, state and local government officials and employees, and a variety of interest groups.

    Pre-requisite: Advocacy*

    Pre- or Co-Requisite: Professional Responsibility or Practice, Problem-Solving and Professional Responsibility (HUSL)

    Criminal Defense Clinic

    Instructor: Kate Kruse

    Students represent clients in criminal court proceedings. Students in this clinic appear in court on a weekly basis to represent clients in bail hearings and take on full representation for clients charged with misdemeanors and gross misdemeanors in selected cases that require in-depth research, investigation, and litigation. A weekly classroom component teaches the skills needed to interview clients and witnesses, analyze and investigate a case, and advocate in court.

    Pre-or co-requisite: Advocacy* or Trial Advocacy; Evidence; Professional Responsibility or Practice, Problem-Solving and Professional Responsibility (HUSL)

    Employment Discrimination Mediation Representation

    Instructor: Elizabeth Thompson

    Students will represent employees claiming employment discrimination who have been referred to mediation proceedings. In a unique collaboration with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the Minnesota Department of Human Rights, students help solve real clients' problems through alternatives to litigation. The clinic also provides an introduction to employment law practice and procedures.

    Pre- or Co-requisite: Professional Responsibility or Practice, Problem-Solving and Professional Responsibility (HUSL)

    Health Law Clinic

    Instructor: Law faculty

    Students represent clients referred through the medical-legal partnership with United Family Medicine, a federally-qualified health care facility in the West 7th neighborhood of St. Paul. Cases will focus on legal issues connected with the health care needs of UFM patients, and may include benefits, housing, employment, immigration, domestic violence, and family law.

    Pre-or co-requisite: Community Health and Vulnerable Populations (HUSL); Professional Responsibility or Practice, Problem-Solving and Professional Responsibility (HUSL)

    Immigration

    Instructor: Paula Duthoy

    Students represent indigent clients in administrative proceedings before the Immigration and Naturalization Service and Federal Court. Cases concern the immigration status of aliens. Students interview and counsel clients, research laws and regulations, write briefs, prepare for hearings, and act as trial counsel at evidentiary hearings. Heavy emphasis is placed upon active representation of clients, and cases that present novel and interesting issues of law and fact. Some required activities (such as court appearances, investigation and interviews) take place during normal business hours.

    Pre-requisite: Advocacy*

    Pre- or Co-requisite: Professional Responsibility or Practice, Problem-Solving and Professional Responsibility (HUSL)

    Indian Law Impact Litigation Clinic

    Instructor: Colette Routel

    The Indian Law Impact Litigation Clinic is available for upper-level students who are interested in Federal Indian Law. The Clinic will provide a mixture of direct representation to Indian tribes in federal courts in Minnesota and/or Wisconsin, as well as amicus curiae support in cases pending in federal appellate courts and the U.S. Supreme Court. Cases are referred to the Clinic by practicing attorneys and through partnerships with federally recognized tribes and tribal organizations.

    Each case will be staffed by 2-3 students, with Professor Colette Routel acting as the lead attorney on each case or project. This course is unavailable through online registration. To register, please contact Professor Routel for an interview at least one week prior to registration.

    Pre-requisite: Federal Indian Law

    Indian Law Tribal Code Drafting

    Instructor: Sarah Deer

    This course may be taken for 3 or 4 credits. The Indian Law Clinic is available for upper-level students who are interested in Federal Indian Law and Tribal Law. Students in the fall Clinic will work on various approved legal development projects at the request of American Indian governments and organizations. Typical projects include constitution drafting and reform, drafting and amendment of statutes, creation of both western-style, traditional, and hybrid dispute resolution processes, and law clerk services to such forums. Each project will be staffed by 2-3 students, with Professor Sarah Deer supervising each project. The drop deadline for this course is one week before classes begin. Federal Indian Law or Introduction to Tribal Law is strongly recommended as a prerequisite or co-requisite. This course is unavailable through online registration. To register, please contact Professor Deer for an interview at least one week prior to registration.

    Pre-requisite: Federal Indian Law

    Innocence Clinic

    Instructor: Julie Jonas

    Students work side-by-side with staff attorneys in the Innocence Project of Minnesota as they investigate and litigate inmates' claims of actual innocence. These investigations go to the heart of current issues in the criminal justice system, such as the reliability of eyewitness identification, the problem of false confessions, the use of snitches and informants, government misconduct, ineffective assistance of counsel, and forensic sciences including DNA testing. Class time is divided among class work, discussion of cases, and periodic guest speakers selected both for the general subject matter and for the specific cases under review. This clinic puts students on the cutting edge of scientific and social science issues that affect the practice of law in the criminal justice system as well as hands-on experience in managing and analyzing large-scale cases for litigation.

    Pre- or Co-requisite: Professional Responsibility or Practice, Problem-Solving and Professional Responsibility (HUSL)

    Recommended: Wrongful Convictions; Criminal Procedure I

    Note: This is a year-long clinic

    Intellectual Property

    Instructors: Jay Erstling Brett Klein, Jim Swendson

    This course will provide students with direct experience working with clients and practicing attorneys in the areas of copyright, patent and trademark law. Students will apply their substantive learning of the law to related IP projects, where they will have an opportunity to hone their basic skills and theoretical understanding in various IP areas. Students with a particular interest in one of the IP focus areas will, to the extent possible, be assigned cases in that area. The Clinic will focus on representing clients in a broad array of IP matters, including filing and prosecuting patent and trademark applications before the USPTO, policy-making, and educating the business and arts communities on the essentials of IP protection.

    Students who are interested in representing clinic clients in patent matters before the USPTO must be eligible for admission to the patent bar. To participate in the USPTO clinical program, students enrolled in the clinic will need, in coordination with the IP Law Clinic, to apply for temporary registration to practice before the USPTO. Please note that once the applications for registration have been submitted to the USPTO, students will no longer be permitted to drop the clinic.

    After registering in the clinic, students should contact Meg Daniel (meg.daniel@wmitchell.edu; room 337) and request the form PTO-158LS which needs to be completed and returned to her, in hard copy, along with an unofficial copy of their undergraduate transcript. It is a regulatory requirement of the Office and Enrollment and Discipline (OED) that an original signature be on file with them in dark ink.

    Note: This is a year-long clinic. Students graduating after fall semester may take the Clinic for fall semester only, and any spring openings because of graduating fall students may be filled on a case-by-case basis.

    Pre-requisite: Any two Intellectual Property courses

    Law & Psychiatry Clinic

    Instructor: Law faculty

    The Law & Psychiatry Clinic is the exploration of intersections between psychiatry and mental illness and legal rules and procedures. This course concentrates on major issues in psychiatry and law. Outside speakers from legal, judicial, and psychiatric communities are invited as guest lecturers. This course includes lectures on assessment in forensic settings, competence to stand trial, criminal responsibility, civil commitment and discussions on personality disorders and correctional environments. This course also includes the opportunity to view and participate in actual clinical assessments.

    This Clinic is comprised of psychiatric residents, psychology fellows and law students. All parties will be expected to read the case files, legal and psychiatric materials and come prepared for a healthy discussion on these issues. Additionally, all students will participate in mock testimony scenarios based on one or more of the case studies.

    Pre-requisite: Advocacy*; Pre- or Co-requisite: Professional Responsibility or Practice, Problem-Solving and Professional Responsibility (HUSL)

    Legal Assistance to Minnesota Prisoners (LAMP)

    Instructor: Brad Colbert

    Students provide civil representation to indigent persons incarcerated in Minnesota. Students represent clients from interview through any trial. Cases include domestic relations, imprisonment-related matters (institutional grievances, parole, and detainers), and the full range of other civil problems including debtor-creditor, wills, contracts, torts, and civil rights issues.

    Pre or Co-requisite: Advocacy*, Professional Responsibility or Practice, Problem-Solving and Professional Responsibility (HUSL)

    Note: LAMP may be taken for the first time by students who are in their last semester of law school ONLY with the permission of the instructors.

    Legal Planning for Tax-Exempt Organizations and Low-Income Clients

    Instructor: Carolyn Grose

    This is a clinic for students interested in working on tax issues, or in representing low income people on a variety of legal planning issues, including estate and end of life planning. Clients include not-for-profit organizations seeking to gain or maintain tax-exempt status, as well as individuals seeking other kinds of legal planning assistance, e.g. with trust and estate issues, health care directives, powers of attorney, permanency planning for children or other dependents, etc.

    Under the supervision of full-time and adjunct faculty, students take full responsibility for representing their clients. In the course of such representation, students interview and counsel clients, research relevant law and draft ruling requests, advice letters, legal memos, organizational documents, estate planning documents, etc.

    Students meet weekly in a seminar class in addition to individually with supervising faculty. Some required activities (such as meetings with clients or other entities, investigation and interviews) might take place during normal business hours, but students have a great deal of flexibility to determine their clinic work time during the course of the semester. As such, this clinic works well for students who have other regular obligations, such as parenting or employment. This clinic does not engage in tax controversy cases or other litigation.

    Pre-requisites: One of the following: Income Tax (WMCL); Tax I (HUSL); Elder Law II (WMCL); Estates and Trusts (WMCL); Estates and Trusts Survey (WMCL); Wills & Trusts (HUSL)

    Pre- or Co-requisites: Advocacy*, Professional Responsibility or Practice, Problem-Solving and Professional Responsibility (HUSL)

    Mediation Clinic

    Instructor: Sharon Press

    Students get hands-on opportunity to serve as a mediator in conciliation (small claims) or housing cases in Ramsey County. A classroom component explores advanced issues and complexities of mediation, building off the experiences that students have in their real-life cases.

    Pre-requisite: One of the following: Mediation (HUSL), Family Mediation, or ADR Survey (WMCL) State Public Defender

    Postconviction Clinic

    Instructors: Cathy Middlebrook and Jennifer Lauermann

    Students provide legal representation to state prison inmates. In this clinic, students will represent approximately four to six clients in a wide variety of matters, handling them from start to finish under the supervision of an experienced attorney at the Minnesota State Public Defender’s Office. Typical cases include post-conviction motions on issues such as sentencing, restitution, conditional release, guilty plea withdrawal, parole and probation revocation, and end of confinement community notification. This clinic provides you with an inside look at the back end of the criminal justice system - where defendants end up after being sentenced - and gives you the opportunity to work and interact with attorneys in Minnesota's State Public Defender Appellate Office.

    Pre- or Co-requisite: Professional Responsibility or Practice, Problem-Solving and Professional Responsibility (HUSL)

    Re-Entry Clinic

    Instructor:Diana Villella Larson

    Students provide civil legal services and other assistance to women leaving prison in Shakopee, Minnesota. This clinic uses a holistic model of representation through collaboration with a social worker.

    Students in this clinic will provide civil legal services to women reentering society and also will provide other creative assistance with barriers to reintegration. Students will work closely with the Department of Corrections and many local social services agencies to assist clients. Students will work with 4-6 women per semester. Students will represent clients from initial interviews through conclusion of court cases, including all court appearances.

    Pre or Co-requisites: Advocacy*, Professional Responsibility or Practice, Problem-Solving and Professional Responsibility (HUSL)

    Note: Students in their last semester of law school may take the Re-Entry Clinic for the first time ONLY with permission of the instructors.

    *Hamline students who have not had an opportunity to take Advocacy may have this requirement waived by consent of the instructor by demonstrating that they have received sufficient instruction in other LRW and/or skills courses.