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    Summer Institute 2015

    Expand your credentials with DRI Summer Institute courses

    Summer is a great time to expand your skills and experience, and perhaps even add a certificate to your resume as you prepare yourself for professional advancement. DRI Summer Institute courses are available to degree and non-degree seeking students with their future in mind. In these courses, you are among a broad cross-section of law and graduate students, practicing lawyers, human resources and business personnel, and other professionals, which mirrors the contemporary, multidisciplinary workplace.

    Summer Institute courses are taught by nationally and internationally recognized faculty actively involved in ADR practice, research, publication, and teaching. This rich diversity of professors gives you the best possible experience and education, while enriching and complementing the efforts and expertise of our own dedicated faculty.

    USNewslaw-2016

    • For the 15th consecutive year Hamline's Dispute Resolution Institute is ranked in the top 5 dispute resolution programs in nation by U.S. News & World Report

     


    Certificate in International Business Negotiation

    The Certificate in International Business Negotiation (IBN) gives you the opportunity to experience the dynamic nature of international business negotiation and to engage with other students in the way that international business occurs - both in person and through distance technology. This program attracts law and business school students, as well as lawyers, professors, and practicing business professionals from around the globe.

    • Residential Negotiation Course (2 law school credits)
      June 23, 24, 25, 29, 30, 2015 from 4:30 - 9:15 p.m.
      June 27, 2015 from 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
    • Online Advanced International Business Negotiation (4 law school credits)
      July 6-24, 2015

    Get complete information about the Certificate in International Business Negotiation.



    Course Quick Links (in alphabetical order)

    Arbitration | Challenging Conversations | Cross-Cultural Dispute Resolution | Decision Making in a Chaotic Reality | Elder Law Mediation |Family Mediation | Mediation ClinicMediation | Mediation Ethics | Negotiation | Theories of Conflict | Course Requirements-Registration Information | Application | 2015 Summer Brochure 


    Summer Course Descriptions (in date order)

    Decision Making in a Chaotic Reality

    May 27, 28, 29, June 1, 2, 3, 2015 from 4:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
    2 law school credits. Qualifies for 24 CLE credits; 24 MN Rule 114 continuing education credits

    Professionals in today’s chaotic world must develop the skills necessary to handle those inevitable situations in which external events intrude upon, and interfere with, the professionals’ abilities to make clear and appropriate decisions. These situations of uncertainty can easily deteriorate into crises. If not handled correctly, they also can cause irreversible damage to relationships. In order to be effective in such situations, conflict professionals must possess the capacity to collect, assess and adapt new and changing information. They must also develop their creative capacities and vision to take into account and address the consequences for the future (“the day after”). Using the most contemporary tools and methodologies for creative problem solving, students will develop the skills needed for making good decisions in a chaotic reality.

    Faculty: Michael Tsur, Founder and Director, Mediation and Conflict Resolution Institute, Jerusalem; Adjunct Professor of Mediation, College of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    Challenging Conversations

    May 30-31, 2015 from 9:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
    1 law school credit. Qualifies for 12 CLE credits; 12 MN Rule 114 continuing education credits

    This course challenges students to master key communication and conflict processing skills. Negotiating when you are personally and emotionally involved is one of our greatest challenges. But is it possible not to be involved? Can we check our feelings at the door? Communication skills, like handling challenging conversations, allow negotiation to happen, and help us get back on track when things get stuck. The course methodology is based on the book, Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most, authored by Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, and Sheila Heen from the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School. The course will focus on two skills dimensions: internal skills - the ability to work with your thoughts and feelings before and during a conversation; and external skills - the things we need to say and do in a conversation to help it go better. Mastering these skills offers the possibility of negotiation success even when your negotiating partners do not share your aspirations to collaborate. The course is constructed as an intensive workshop, including group discussions, simulations, and challenging conversations set in a wide variety of contexts.

    Faculty: Michael Tsur, Founder and Director, Mediation and Conflict Resolution Institute, Jerusalem; Adjunct Professor of Mediation, College of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    Family Mediation

    June 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 2015 from 8:00 a.m. - 5:45 p.m.
    3 law school credits. Qualifies for 40 CLE credits; satisfies MN Rule 114 certification standards for family law facilitative neutrals.

    This is a challenging, high-energy course in basic divorce mediation skills and practice development. Along with the basic content areas of divorce settlement - property division, parenting, child and spousal support, divorce tax issues - the course also addresses the role of consultants and lawyers, conflict theory, psychological issues, power balancing, domestic abuse, drafting agreements, and mediation ethics. Although designed with the law student and family lawyer in mind, the course also is an ideal training and specialization opportunity for therapists and other social service professionals. This course emphasizes experiential learning with the opportunity for individual feedback from experienced coaches.

    Faculty: Aimee Gourlay, Director, Mediation Center

    Theories of Conflict

    June 8, 9, 10, 11, 2015 from 4:30 - 9:15 p.m.
    June 14, 2015 from 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
    2 law school credits. Qualifies for 24 CLE credits; 24 MN Rule 114 continuing education credits

    This interdisciplinary course introduces students to important theoretical perspectives on our understanding of conflict and conflict response. Specifically, students explore the biological/physiological, psychodynamic, social psychological, communication, and sociological/political perspectives on conflict by reading and discussing major theoretical works within each perspective. Emphasis is on comparing and distinguishing key dimensions of these theories, such as the nature and sources of conflict, conflict escalation, conflict response, and the nature of the third party role. Classes follow an interactive format. Using case studies, exercises, and group discussion to draw upon personal experiences, including those invovling race and social identity, the course explores the usefulness of each perspective to understand the experience of conflict.

    Faculty: Ken Fox, Professor, Hamline University School of Business; Senior Fellow, Dispute Resolution Institute, Hamline University School of Law

    Cross-Cultural Dispute Resolution

    June 16, 17, 18, 22, 2015 from 4:30 - 9:15 p.m.
    June 20, 2015 from 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
    2 law school credits. Qualifies for 18 Standard and 6 Elimination of Bias CLE credits; 24 MN Rule 114 continuing education credits

    This course examines how obvious and not-so obvious cultural difference impacts resolution of inter-personal and inter-state (international) disputes. Specifically, the course will bring an international perspective to understanding the impact of culture in the most commonly used international and domestic dispute resolution processes (negotiation, mediation and arbitration). It will follow a three-step approach to know and understand the influence of culture on decision-making, including: awareness and knowledge of one's own culture; knowledge and understanding of another party's culture; and knowledge and impact of either on the desired goal/outcome of the dispute. This course will help students more culturally aware and better equipped for effective participation in dispute resolution processes that increasingly involve different languages, customs, values, nationalities, and states of origin.

    Faculty: Nadja Alexander, Professor (Hon.), The University of Queensland, Australia; Humboldt Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and Comparative Law, Hamburg, Germany.

    Mediation Clinic

    Mondays, June 22-August 3, 2015 from 1:00 - 4:00 p.m. Students will be expected to attend court sessions at Ramsey County Courthouse two mornings a week (specific dates to be scheduled)
    3 law school credits

    The Mediation Clinic is a six-week, intensive introduction to the practice of mediation. Students will advance from observation to participation as co-mediators, and ultimately as independent mediators, with the supervision of Hamline law faculty. In addition, students will be asked to consider critically the mediation process from the standpoint of an advocate/representative of a client in order to become an effective problem-solving lawyer

    Pre/Co-Requisite: Students must have successfully completed a Mediation or Family Mediation course or be taking the summer Mediation course, offered through DRI, concurrently.

    Faculty: Sharon Press, Professor and Director, Dispute Resolution Institute, Hamline University School of Law and Lynn LeMoine, Assistant Director of Admissions, JD 2011, Hamline University School of Law

    Mediation

    June 23, 24, 25, 29, 30, July 1, 2015 from 4:30 - 9:30 p.m.
    June 27, 2015 from 8:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
    3 law school credits. Qualifies for 40 CLE credits; satisfies MN Rule 114 certification standards for civil facilitative/hybrid neutrals

    Through discussion, simulations and role-play, this course focuses on the structure and goals of the mediation process and on the skills and techniques mediators use to aid parties in overcoming barriers to dispute resolution. The course also examines the underlying negotiation orientations and strategies that mediators may confront and employ; the roles of attorneys and clients; dealing with difficult people and power imbalances; cultural, race, and social identity considerations; and ethical issues for lawyers and mediators. In addition, special attention is devoted to the art of successful representation of clients in mediation.

    Faculty: Art Hinshaw, Clinical Professor and Director, Lodestar Dispute Resolution Program, Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law, Arizona State University

    Elder Law Mediation

    July 11-12, 2015 from 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
    1 law school credit. Qualifies for 12.5 Standard and 1.5 Ethics CLE credits; 12 MN Rule 114 continuing education credits

    This course focuses on adult guardianship and family caregiver mediation. Learn the differences between other types of mediation and elder mediation. In this course, we will focus on the mediator's responsibility toward inclusion of the older person's voice in the mediation and techniques for working in multiparty family mediations. At the conclusion of this course, you will be prepared to organize and perform elder mediations. This training is meant as an advanced training for those who have already taken basic mediation training. What you will learn:

    • Differences between elder mediation and other types of mediation
    • Guardianship/conservatorship law and practice
    • Capacity and disability issues
    • Red flags for elder abuse
    • Confidentiality issues
    • Multiparty mediation and family dynamics
    • Deciding who should be present at the mediation
    • Working with attorneys, court representatives, GAL's (Guardian ad litems) and institutional representatives
    • Role of community resources, support persons, advocates, and surrogates in mediation
    • Ethical standards for elder mediators
    • Mental and physical effects of aging, dementia, disabilities, and accommodation in mediation
    • Societal and participant bias, family and cultural attitudes, and their impact on the mediation process
    • Pre-mediation interviews and screening for appropriateness of mediation

    Pre/Co-Requisite: Mediation

    Faculty: Zena Zumeta, President of the Mediation Training & Consultation Institute, Zena Zumeta Mediation Services, and The Collaborative Workplace in Ann Arbor, Michigan

    Negotiation

    July 13, 14, 15, 16, 2015 from 4:30 - 9:15 p.m.
    July 18, 2015 from 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
    2 law school credits: Qualifies for 24 CLE credits; 24 MN Rule 114 continuing education credits

    This course examines the skills, constraints, and dynamics of the negotiation process. A theoretical framework for understanding negotiation practice in a variety of contexts will be developed through readings, highly interactive exercises, and role-plays. The course addresses fundamental skills such as systematic preparation, management of the negotiation process, and identification of optimal agreements. Ethics constraints of negotiation also are considered. Course content is drawn from the fields of law, psychology, business, and communication.

    Faculty: Giuseppe De Palo, International Professor of ADR Law and Practice, Hamline University School of Law; Co-Founder, ADR Center, Italy

    Mediation Ethics

    July 27, 28, 29, 30, 2015 from 4:30 - 9:15 p.m.
    August 1, 2015 from 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
    2 law school credits. Qualifies for 24 Ethics CLE credits; 24 MN Rule 114 continuing education credits

    This course addresses the many ethical dilemmas mediators encounter in their effort to serve as intermediaries coaxing disputants toward settlement. Some of these dilemmas derive from the mandate that mediators remain neutral and impartial. Others relate to the requirement to help disputants act autonomously while presiding over a "quality process." Others stem from the need to "encourage" informed decision-making while avoiding the role of counselor or purveyor of legal advice. Still other dilemmas arise as a result of disputant behavior. What is a mediator's obligation when encountering cultural practices and norms that disputants seek to implement in their agreements that violate the mediator's own sense of ethics? We will ponder these dilemmas (and more) by considering concrete hypotheticals, as well as cases and grievances that have been brought against mediators in various jurisdictions. The class will require you to: read and engage with the assigned material; participate in group exercises and mock mediations and write a final reaction paper to a hypothetical presented the last day of class.

    Pre/Co-Requisite: Mediation or Family Mediation

    Faculty: Ellen Waldman, Professor of Law, Thomas Jefferson School of Law 

    Arbitration

    July 27, 28, 29, 30, 2015 from 4:30 - 9:15 p.m.
    August 1, 2015 from 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
    2 law school credits. Qualifies for 24 CLE credits; satisfies MN Rule 114 certification standard for civil adjudicative/evaluative neutrals.

    This foundation course covers the salient points of U.S. arbitration law as it relates to domestic and international matters. The course curriculum begins with an introduction to the basic legal concepts that make up arbitration law and to the institutions that are central to arbitration practice. Consideration of the Federal Arbitration Act follows, along with systematic treatment of the role of contract in arbitration and the function of subject matter inarbitrability. Problems relating to the enforcement of arbitral awards, the role of the arbitrator (focusing on the arbitrator's functions, duties, and responsibilities), and other practice issues are examined. The basic facets of international commercial arbitration also are introduced. Through lectures, demonstrations, discussions, and simulations, this interactive curriculum is designed to foster effective use of contemporary arbitral processes.

    Faculty: Allen Blair, Associate Professor, Hamline University School of Law



    Course Requirements

    Students must attend all class sessions and complete an advance reading assignment. Degree-seeking students must submit a written paper or complete an exam.  Students may take one or more courses. Elder Law Mediation and Mediation Ethics requires a Co/Pre-Requisite of Mediation. Hamline Law students may take either the Mediation or Family Mediation course but may not take both for academic credit. Enrollment is limited to enhance the interactive nature of each course.

    Course Materials

    All courses require completion of a reading assignment prior to the first class meeting. Syllabi for all courses will be made available 2 weeks before the first day of class and will include a list of the text/course materials which students will need to purchase for each course. The advance reading assignment will be provided prior to the start of each course.  Syllabi will also be posted on the Law Library's syllabi web site.

    Registration

    Law Students/Certificate Students: Degree-seeking students currently enrolled in an ABA accredited law school should complete Part A of the application form and return it with a letter from their school's registrar reflecting the applicant's status as a student in good standing with permission to take the Hamline course(s) as a visiting student. Note: Hamline Law students and certificate students do not need a letter of good standing from the registrar.

    Graduate Students: Degree-seeking graduate students currently enrolled in an accredited graduate program should complete Part A of the application form and return it with a letter from their school's registrar reflecting the applicant's status as a student in good standing with permission to take the Hamline course(s) as a visiting student. Note: Hamline MSL students do not need a letter of good standing from the registrar.

    Attorneys: Attorneys may apply for summer courses by completing Part B of the application form. Attorneys will be granted special student status. CLE and MN Rule 114 credits will be granted upon completion of each course.

    Others: Other professionals may apply to take summer courses by completing Part C of the application form. To be considered, applicants must furnish a transcript indicating completion of an undergraduate or graduate degree.

    Tuition

    Tuition for degree-seeking students is $1,302 per credit. This includes students seeking credit for a graduate degree or those seeking credits to complete the Hamline Certificate Program in Dispute Resolution.

    Tuition for audit students is $651 per credit with the exception of the Mediation and Family Mediation courses which are offered at a flat fee of $1,100.

    A $150 per course, non-refundable tuition deposit must accompany all applications. The tuition deposit will be deducted from the total tuition amount. This deposit will only be returned if the applicant is not accepted into the course. The balance of the tuition is due one week prior to the beginning class session for each course after which no refund will be made. Any request to drop a course must be made in writing.

    Applications are accepted on a first-come/first-registered basis. Students will receive confirmation of enrollment via email. Hamline University School of Law reserves the right to cancel any course that does not meet minimum enrollment requirements.

    Housing

    On-campus short term summer housing is available for Law Students. Learn more from the Office of Residential Life.

    Learn more about additional short-term housing options including special area hotel rates and Guest House accommodations.

    Hamline University is registered as a private institution with the Minnesota Office of Higher Education pursuant to sections 136A.61 to 136A.71. Registration is not an endorsement of the institution. Credits earned at the institution may not transfer to all other institutions.