• Course Descriptions: Topics and Seminars

    Fall 2014

    Selected Topic: Basic Federal Income Tax

    LAW 9450-W3

    Holcomb, Morgan

    2 credits.

    General Course Description of Selected Topics
    Educates students to practice in emerging and specialized areas of law not covered by advanced courses in the curriculum. Topics covered differ from semester to semester; course descriptions for each topic area are approved by the associate dean for academic affairs. Students may take more than one Selected Topics course in their law school career as space permits.

    Selected Topics courses do not satisfy the seminar requirement for graduation

    Every Year Course

    Selected Topic: Corporate Governance and Business Ethics

    LAW 9450-1

    Graham, Katherine

    3 credits.

    This course presents legal and economic analysis of corporate structure. Using assigned readings and research, we will discuss current corporate scandals such as the financial crisis, Enron, WorldCom and others. We will analyze new federal legislation and regulation such as the Dodd-Frank and Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Weaknesses and failures of corporate governance illustrate points to watch for as a corporate lawyer. Corporate and legal ethics play a large part in avoiding both corporate disaster and legal liability.

    Legal jobs requiring corporate governance expertise include: private law practice assisting clients with an array of legal compliance and business law issues; federal and state government regulatory counsel; in-house corporate counsel, legislative drafting and lobbying practice; and criminal prosecution and defense involving financial crimes. Practitioners from several of these areas will visit our class to provide their perspectives.

    This Selected Topics course will satisfy the Business Law Certificate requirement for a Business Ethics course.

    General Course Description of Selected Topics
    Educates students to practice in emerging and specialized areas of law not covered by advanced courses in the curriculum. Topics covered differ from semester to semester; course descriptions for each topic area are approved by the associate dean for academic affairs. Students may take more than one Selected Topics course in their law school career as space permits.

    Selected Topics courses do not satisfy the seminar requirement for graduation

    Every Year Course

    Selected Topic: Food Law

    LAW 9450-2

    Graham, David
    Husnik, Nancy

    2 credits.

    This course will focus on the regulation of food by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Students will learn about the statutory and regulatory framework related to these agencies and their interpretation and enforcement of related statutes and regulations and will gain insight into the agencies’ decision-making processes and policies. In addition, we will discuss current food issues and news stories throughout the class term. Reading assignments will be from FOOD AND DRUG LAW CASES AND MATERIALS by Peter Barton Hutt, Richard Merrill, and Lewis Grossman (Foundation Press most recent edition). Because of the constantly changing legal environment, new regulations, articles and cases will be assigned and posted on TWEN from time to time.

    General Course Description of Selected Topics
    Educates students to practice in emerging and specialized areas of law not covered by advanced courses in the curriculum. Topics covered differ from semester to semester; course descriptions for each topic area are approved by the associate dean for academic affairs. Students may take more than one Selected Topics course in their law school career as space permits.

    Selected Topics courses do not satisfy the seminar requirement for graduation

    Every Year Course

    Selected Topic: Law and Humanities

    LAW 9450-W2

    2 credits.

    Law students, attorneys, judges and members of the legal profession are not ciphers or statistics (although the law school experience from time to time may imply otherwise). They are thinking, reasoning, feeling, sentient human beings who bring to their chosen profession, as all do in all walks of life, the composite sum of our life's experiences. Our cultural, social, moral, ethical value system is part and parcel of our existence. ”No mind is an island.” Law and Humanities, through selected readings, amplified by group discussion, allows the teacher and students to interact on the values and judgments which underlie our decision making process making us better attorneys and more complete, richer human beings.

    General Course Description of Selected Topics
    Educates students to practice in emerging and specialized areas of law not covered by advanced courses in the curriculum. Topics covered differ from semester to semester; course descriptions for each topic area are approved by the associate dean for academic affairs. Students may take more than one Selected Topics course in their law school career as space permits.

    Selected Topics courses do not satisfy the seminar requirement for graduation

    Every Year Course

    Selected Topic: Reading, Writing, and Analyzing Like a Lawyer

    LAW 9450-3

    Morris, Kenneth

    2 credits.

    This course focuses on the reading, writing and analytical skills necessary to be successful in law school and practice. Emphasis will be on applying the law to concrete legal issues and problems as a prosecutor or a trial judge. Each law student should understand the importance of their individual skill strengths and weaknesses and their relationship to their success as a law student and a lawyer. The legal subject matter of the course will primarily focus on criminal misdemeanors but may vary from year to year. The course utilizes extensive testing and feedback to develop these lawyering skills.

    Enrollment in the course, part of Hamline's academic support program, is by invitation or permission of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

    General Course Description of Selected Topics
    Educates students to practice in emerging and specialized areas of law not covered by advanced courses in the curriculum. Topics covered differ from semester to semester; course descriptions for each topic area are approved by the associate dean for academic affairs. Students may take more than one Selected Topics course in their law school career as space permits.

    Selected Topics courses do not satisfy the seminar requirement for graduation

    Every Year Course

    Seminar: Comparative Constitutional Law and Judicial Politics

    LAW 9400-W

    3 credits.

    This seminar offers a cross-national examination of the intersection of law and politics in the development of constitutional law, especially in newly emerging democracies. This course includes inquiry into the relationship between globalization and constitutional law development and the role that law plays in social control, protection of minority rights, social change, and economic development. It also includes comparative case-study examination of representative constitutional law systems in various parts of the world and their legal professionals, judicial selection methods, judicial decision making, and methodological issues involved in the comparative study of legal processes and behavior.

    A seminar is a rigorous writing experience requiring the production of a substantial (approximately 8,000 words) research paper. Each student will complete at least one well-developed draft, which the professor will critique extensively. Each student will rewrite the draft(s) based on the faculty member's assessments. This requirement may be satisfied with multiple papers that, in the aggregate, meet this requirement.

    Enrollment in the seminar class cannot exceed 16 students.

    A student may take more than one seminar, but students who have not yet had a seminar have priority.

    Every Year Course

    Seminar: Jury Trial

    LAW 9400-1

    Thompson, Peter

    3 credits.

    This seminar will address the role and function of the jury in the adversary system in the United States. Selected readings in the beginning of the course will examine the historic role of the jury and the promulgation of the 6th and 7th Amendment guarantees of jury trial. We will address whether the commitment to lay decision makers in our legal system contributes to fairness, truth and justice. We will explore current criticism of the jury system in complex litigation and in emotionally charged litigation. The class will further examine modern procedures (voir dire, exclusionary rules of evidence) and tactics aimed at controlling or influencing juror decision making and limiting juror discretion.

    The second part of the course will consist of student presentations of research topics focusing on some aspect of the jury trial. Each student will prepare at least one advanced draft and a final draft of a research paper including original analysis about a current or historic issue. The subject of the research topic may cover a wide variety of issues relating to the jury trial including an examination of a rule of evidence, ethical issues or a comparative study of decision making models. The issues may involve criminal or civil trials, although certain constitutional criminal procedural issues unrelated to the function of the jury (such as search and seizure or most Miranda-type issues) would be outside the scope of the seminar. The topics will be chosen by the student and approved by the professor.

    There will be no examination. Each student’s grade in the course will be earned based on class participation (attendance is mandatory), presentation of the research topic, and the two drafts of the paper.

    A seminar is a rigorous writing experience requiring the production of a substantial (approximately 8,000 words) research paper. Each student will complete at least one well-developed draft, which the professor will critique extensively. Each student will rewrite the draft(s) based on the faculty member's assessments. This requirement may be satisfied with multiple papers that, in the aggregate, meet this requirement.

    Enrollment in the seminar class cannot exceed 16 students.

    A student may take more than one seminar, but students who have not yet had a seminar have priority.

    Every Year Course

    Seminar: National Security Law

    LAW 9400-2

    Swanson, Steven

    3 credits.

    This seminar will focus on the roles played by the President, Congress, and the Judiciary in formulating United States foreign policy. The constitutional underpinnings of power will be examined in light of the need to maintain U.S. national security abroad and at home. In particular, the power to utilize force (both overt and covert) and the special concerns created by a war against terrorism in a democratic society will be examined.

    A seminar is a rigorous writing experience requiring the production of a substantial (approximately 8,000 words) research paper. Each student will complete at least one well-developed draft, which the professor will critique extensively. Each student will rewrite the draft(s) based on the faculty member's assessments. This requirement may be satisfied with multiple papers that, in the aggregate, meet this requirement.

    Enrollment in the seminar class cannot exceed 16 students.

    A student may take more than one seminar, but students who have not yet had a seminar have priority.

    Every Year Course

    Summer 2014

    Selected Topic: Addressing Conflict in Complex Health Care Organizations

    LAW 9450-4

    2 credits.

    The delivery of health services in the United States has become increasingly complex. Medical technology is developing more rapidly than it can be mastered; demand for services is increasing as the population ages; workforce shortages are beginning to impact access to care; ethical debates occur daily; and there is an expanding demand for improved quality and safety among patients, payers, and regulators. Improved access to health care information for consumers, direct marketing of pharmaceuticals, and changes triggered by the Affordable Care Act are functionally shifting traditional relationships between health service providers and those who seek their help. In the midst of all this change, conflict has become a routine component of health care delivery.

    The course will include a look at conflict in the context of the delivery of health services in complex health care systems with an emphasis on disputes among care providers, administrators, patients and their families. The course will also look at conflict in the context of changes in health care delivery associated with the Affordable Care Act and opportunities for those with conflict expertise to facilitate conflicts associated with major changes in the provision of health services in the United States.

    General Course Description of Selected Topics
    Educates students to practice in emerging and specialized areas of law not covered by advanced courses in the curriculum. Topics covered differ from semester to semester; course descriptions for each topic area are approved by the associate dean for academic affairs. Students may take more than one Selected Topics course in their law school career as space permits.

    Selected Topics courses do not satisfy the seminar requirement for graduation

    Every Year Course

    Selected Topic: Biotechnology Policy

    LAW 9450-1

    Elster, Nanette
     

    2 credits.

    Advances in biotechnology and the life sciences are reshaping when life begins, how life is lived and when life ends. Developments such as vaccines; prenatal and preimplantation genetics; transplantation of tissues, organs and other body parts; fertility preservation, and advancements in biomedical research challenge long held perceptions of the intersection of law, medicine and society. These weighty challenges exemplify the reactive nature of law and the role that ethical dilemmas, and at times, ethical disputes play in establishing law and policy in a very diverse and pluralistic society.

    This class will explore the historical relationship between law and bioethics and examine how law and bioethics come together or may be at odds in resolving the many dilemmas raised by biotechnology. This class will look at how innovations such as vaccines, genetic diagnosis at the beginning of life, fertility preservation and transplantation have influenced, changed, transformed and created new legal, ethical and policy responses as well as how existing policies have been adapted to accommodate these new technologies. We will examine how existing frameworks continue to be applied and we will analyze whether, in fact, new approaches are truly necessary or even desirable.
     

    General Course Description of Selected Topics
    Educates students to practice in emerging and specialized areas of law not covered by advanced courses in the curriculum. Topics covered differ from semester to semester; course descriptions for each topic area are approved by the associate dean for academic affairs. Students may take more than one Selected Topics course in their law school career as space permits.

    Selected Topics courses do not satisfy the seminar requirement for graduation

    Every Year Course

    Selected Topic: Bridging Chasms: The Power and Practice of Dialogue

    LAW 9450-5

    1 credits.

    Constructive conversations about divisive issues are often in short supply in the US today, especially where the issues touch on differences of identity, values, religion and fundamental worldviews. Patterns of dysfunctional discourse have corroded relationships in families, organizations and society at large, preventing people from living and working together in the most beneficial ways. This class will explore the theory and practice of reflective structured dialogue (RSD), an approach to deep identity differences with roots in family therapy, communications theory and interpersonal neurobiology. Created in 1989 by the Public Conversations Project, RSD provides the means for opponents to shift their communication practices and change their relationships while retaining their passionate perspectives. It has been refined in conflicts over abortion, sexual orientation, gender, social class, religion and race as they present in organizations and in society at large in the US, Nigeria, Liberia, Burundi, Mexico, the Philippines and many other countries.

    We will examine the theory roots of dialogue in general and RSD in particular. Students will learn the fundamental components of dialogue practice through study and in-class experience. Learning modalities will also include lectures, readings, case studies and video clips. Special emphasis will be given to achieving clarity of purpose, preparing participants in advance, and using structure and agreements to prevent in-meeting problems and enable people to speak and listen in fresh and constructive ways.

    General Course Description of Selected Topics
    Educates students to practice in emerging and specialized areas of law not covered by advanced courses in the curriculum. Topics covered differ from semester to semester; course descriptions for each topic area are approved by the associate dean for academic affairs. Students may take more than one Selected Topics course in their law school career as space permits.

    Selected Topics courses do not satisfy the seminar requirement for graduation

    Every Year Course

    Selected Topic: Cross-Cultural Dispute Resolution

    LAW 9450-6

    Singh, Sukhsimranjit

    2 credits

    This course examines how obvious and no-so-obvious cultural difference impacts resolution of inter-personal and inter-state (international) disputes. Specifically, the course will bring an international perspective to understanding the impact of culture in the most commonly used international and domestic dispute resolution processes (negotiation, mediation and arbitration). It will follow a three-step approach to know and understand the influence of culture on decision-making, including: awareness and knowledge of one's own culture; knowledge and understanding of another party's culture; and knowledge and impact of either on the desired goal/outcome of the dispute. This course will help students be more culturally aware and better equipped for effective participation in dispute resolution processes that increasingly involve different languages, customs, values, nationalities, and states of origin.

    General Course Description of Selected Topics
    Educates students to practice in emerging and specialized areas of law not covered by advanced courses in the curriculum. Topics covered differ from semester to semester; course descriptions for each topic area are approved by the associate dean for academic affairs. Students may take more than one Selected Topics course in their law school career as space permits.

    Selected Topics courses do not satisfy the seminar requirement for graduation

    Every Year Course

    Selected Topic: Dispute Systems Design

    LAW 9450-3

    Hedeen, Timothy

    2 credits.

    Dispute systems design integrates conflict resolution principles with organizational development practices. Organizations ranging from private multinational corporations to public education agencies and non-profits have tailored dispute systems to address conflict internally and externally. Through constructive approaches to conflict anticipation, management, and resolution, these organizations have realized the benefits of ADR to include higher morale, lower turnover, and less frequent litigation. This course examines the historical evolution of dispute systems design and offers a step-by-step application of best practices in assessment, system design, implementation, and evaluation. Course exercises and readings emphasize stakeholder involvement, organizational culture audits, appropriate dispute resolution processes, and strategic program implementation.

    General Course Description of Selected Topics
    Educates students to practice in emerging and specialized areas of law not covered by advanced courses in the curriculum. Topics covered differ from semester to semester; course descriptions for each topic area are approved by the associate dean for academic affairs. Students may take more than one Selected Topics course in their law school career as space permits.

    Selected Topics courses do not satisfy the seminar requirement for graduation

    Every Year Course

    Selected Topic: Law and the Business of Baseball

    LAW 9450-W

    Schiff, Louis

    1 credits.

    By looking through the lens of baseball, this course will explore the dynamic relationship baseball and law have enjoyed for more than 180 years. Baseball is a highly legalistic game which involves much more than just the two teams playing. Participants will study the origins of the game and how the rules of baseball parallel statutes. Baseball is more than just the national pastime. It is a business that affects the nation. A close examination will be given as to the role attorneys have played in the formation of organized leagues and the roles they have played in labor and management. Particular attention will be dedicated to reading of cases involving the rights of owners and players to enter into contracts and free speech; the power of the baseball commissioner; the integration of baseball; litigation regarding ownership of balls and bats that have made their way into the stands; litigation arising under tort law for the responsibility of team owners; litigation over baseball memorabilia; and how baseball rules and gamesmanship teach players and fans the nature of judicial interpretation and function. This course is designed to challenge and stimulate your thinking. Participation is strongly encouraged. The teaching methods will include lecture, class discussion, case studies, scholarly readings, textbook readings, video clips and guest speakers. The final grade will be based on an original student paper of no more than 12-15 double spaced pages, including footnotes. So get ready to enjoy the game as you never had before. Bring your glove, you never know what you might catch!

    General Course Description of Selected Topics
    Educates students to practice in emerging and specialized areas of law not covered by advanced courses in the curriculum. Topics covered differ from semester to semester; course descriptions for each topic area are approved by the associate dean for academic affairs. Students may take more than one Selected Topics course in their law school career as space permits.

    Selected Topics courses do not satisfy the seminar requirement for graduation

    Every Year Course

    Selected Topic: Seminar: Constitutional History

    LAW 9450-7

    Mader, George

    3 credits.

    This course studies the historical development of United States Constitution itself. We study the origins of the Constitution before and in the Constitutional Convention of 1787, its ratification, and its subsequent amendment over the next two centuries. Themes will emerge: the structure of the document and the government it constitutes; the compromises and convulsions that have shaped the Constitution throughout history; and, most especially, the grounds, terms, and means of debate accompanying each change (or near change) in the Constitution. Throughout, at the center of the course will be investigation of the forms of constitutional interpretation and argument that use and require an historical understanding of the document.

    Successful completion of this course satisfies the upper-level Advanced Research and Writing requirement.

    General Course Description of Selected Topics
    Educates students to practice in emerging and specialized areas of law not covered by advanced courses in the curriculum. Topics covered differ from semester to semester; course descriptions for each topic area are approved by the associate dean for academic affairs. Students may take more than one Selected Topics course in their law school career as space permits.

    Selected Topics courses do not satisfy the seminar requirement for graduation

    Every Year Course

    MSL Selected Topic: Common Law: Civil and Criminal

    LAW 9450-O2

    Butterfoss, Edwin
    Online

    3 credits.
    General Course Description of Selected Topics
    Educates students to practice in emerging and specialized areas of law not covered by advanced courses in the curriculum. Topics covered differ from semester to semester; course descriptions for each topic area are approved by the associate dean for academic affairs. Students may take more than one Selected Topics course in their law school career as space permits.

    Selected Topics courses do not satisfy the seminar requirement for graduation

    Every Year Course

    MSL Selected Topic: Torts

    LAW 9450-W

    Hermer, Laura

    3 credits.

    General Course Description of Selected Topics
    Educates students to practice in emerging and specialized areas of law not covered by advanced courses in the curriculum. Topics covered differ from semester to semester; course descriptions for each topic area are approved by the associate dean for academic affairs. Students may take more than one Selected Topics course in their law school career as space permits.

    Selected Topics courses do not satisfy the seminar requirement for graduation

    Every Year Course

    Spring 2014

    Selected Topic: Federal Habeas Corpus

    LAW 9450-1

    Thompson, Peter

    2 credits.

    In this course we will study in depth the evolution of habeas corpus and how the habeas remedy is utilized in the federal court system today. The study of habeas corpus law gives the students an opportunity to observe how constitutional law, criminal law and procedure, civil procedure, and even trial and appellate practice, all bear upon the courts’ struggle to apply the body of habeas corpus law to individual cases. This course will examine recent litigation, particularly cases pertaining to the detention of terrorist suspects formerly and presently held at Guantanamo.

    General Course Description of Selected Topics
    Educates students to practice in emerging and specialized areas of law not covered by advanced courses in the curriculum. Topics covered differ from semester to semester; course descriptions for each topic area are approved by the associate dean for academic affairs. Students may take more than one Selected Topics course in their law school career as space permits.

    Selected Topics courses do not satisfy the seminar requirement for graduation

    Every Year Course


    Selected Topic: Mental Health Law

    LAW 9450-2

    Lindberg, Barbara

    2 credits.

    Offered by the Health Law Institute.

    This course examines the legal and ethical duties that apply to mental health care providers, as well as the rights of individuals with mental illness, intellectual disabilities, neurodegenerative diseases, alcohol and drug dependency, and brain injuries. Special attention is given to the licensing, certification, and accreditation of mental health care providers; informed consent to mental health treatment and behavioral research; the confidentiality of mental health records under Minnesota and federal law; the requirements for using physical and chemical restraints, seclusion, and electroconvulsive therapy; the question of whether patients have a right to mental health care; the prerequisites for involuntary mental health commitment; mental health parity legislation; and the burgeoning field of neuroethics.

    General Course Description of Selected Topics
    Educates students to practice in emerging and specialized areas of law not covered by advanced courses in the curriculum. Topics covered differ from semester to semester; course descriptions for each topic area are approved by the associate dean for academic affairs. Students may take more than one Selected Topics course in their law school career as space permits.

    Selected Topics courses do not satisfy the seminar requirement for graduation

    Every Year Course

    Selected Topic: Prosecuting Child Abuse

    LAW 9450-3

    McKeig, Anne
    Furnstahl, Michael

    3 credits.

    This course is for students who have an interest in public service and children's issues. The course is designed to provide an overview of the prosecution process in civil and criminal cases involving child abuse. The various aspects of child abuse are taught along with a process for developing a multi-disciplinary team. This course will explore the necessity of working with other professionals such as physicians in preparing a case for prosecution. Topics will include developing the evidence, expert witnesses, preparing the child for testimony, and ethical responsibilities.

    Recommended: Evidence, Professional Responsibility

    General Course Description of Selected Topics
    Educates students to practice in emerging and specialized areas of law not covered by advanced courses in the curriculum. Topics covered differ from semester to semester; course descriptions for each topic area are approved by the associate dean for academic affairs. Students may take more than one Selected Topics course in their law school career as space permits.

    Selected Topics courses do not satisfy the seminar requirement for graduation

    Every Year Course

    Seminar: Gender, Sexuality, and the Law

    LAW 9400-2

    Tweedy, Ann

    3 credits.

    This seminar will examine how sex, gender, and sexuality are understood in our society and how these classifications impact a person’s legal and social status. Students will study a combination of theory and black letter law. In addition to looking at the evolution of the notion of sex discrimination and the emerging discrimination protections for LGBT persons, we’ll look at the construction of sexuality, gender, and sex in society and examine how those constructions impact the law, paying particular attention to those who may fall through the cracks of current definitions.

    A seminar is a rigorous writing experience requiring the production of a substantial research paper. Each student will complete at least one well-developed draft, which the professor will critique extensively. Each student will rewrite the draft(s) based on the faculty member's assessments.

    Enrollment in the seminar class cannot exceed 16 students.

    A student may take more than one seminar, but students who have not yet had a seminar have priority.

    Every Year Course

    Seminar: Genetics and the Law

    LAW 9400-3

    Kahn, Jonathan

    3 credits.

    Developments in biotechnology and the life sciences have thrown into question existing legal approaches and instruments dealing with such critical issues as discrimination, intellectual property, reproduction, health, drug development, informed consent and privacy. These developments are reconstituting concepts of legal rights and obligations of people in relation to their governing institutions. Focusing in particular on new genetic technologies, this course seeks to identify and explore important ethical, legal, and policy issues associated with these developments.

    A seminar is a rigorous writing experience requiring the production of a substantial research paper. Each student will complete at least one well-developed draft, which the professor will critique extensively. Each student will rewrite the draft(s) based on the faculty member's assessments.

    Enrollment in the seminar class cannot exceed 16 students.

    A student may take more than one seminar, but students who have not yet had a seminar have priority.

    Every Year Course

    Seminar: Reproductive Rights

    LAW 9400-4

    Hermer, Laura

    3 credits.

    In this seminar, we will examine the law, ethics, and policy of reproductive rights in the United States. The topics of study include legal and bioethical issues related to reproduction, contraception, and abortion, as well as the ways in which law and society have shaped, and been shaped by, conceptions of motherhood, family, and women's role in this country.

    A seminar is a rigorous writing experience requiring the production of a substantial research paper. Each student will complete at least one well-developed draft, which the professor will critique extensively. Each student will rewrite the draft(s) based on the faculty member's assessments.

    Enrollment in the seminar class cannot exceed 16 students.

    A student may take more than one seminar, but students who have not yet had a seminar have priority.

    Every Year Course

    Seminar: Second Amendment

    LAW 9400-W

    Olson, Joseph

    3 credits.

    This seminar will explore a unique constitutional provision. Although the Second Amendment is hotly debated, the United States Supreme Court has only considered Second Amendment claims in a handful of cases. After 70 years, a new decision was rendered in D.C. v. Heller (2008). The seminar will explore the history of the Second Amendment beginning with its English antecedents and the constitutional debates over the militia and the armed population. Seminar members will explore the extensive law review and historical literature related to the Second Amendment; cases from state Supreme Courts ruling on analogous provisions in state constitutions, legislative determinations concerning the second amendment, the legislative history of the Fourteenth Amendment as it relates to the Second Amendment and the five US Supreme Court decisions that have pronounced on the Second Amendment. Contemporary issues implicating the Second Amendment will also be explored. Active class participation is expected and students are expected to do a substantial paper and discuss their research in class. Books: Stephen Halbrook, That Every Man Be Armed: The Evolution of a Constitutional Right (1984) and Joyce Lee Malcolm, To Keep and Bear Arms: The Origins of an Anglo-American Right (1994).

    Recommended: Constitutional Law I

    A seminar is a rigorous writing experience requiring the production of a substantial research paper. Each student will complete at least one well-developed draft, which the professor will critique extensively. Each student will rewrite the draft(s) based on the faculty member's assessments.

    Enrollment in the seminar class cannot exceed 16 students.

    A student may take more than one seminar, but students who have not yet had a seminar have priority.

    Every Year Course

    Seminar: Small Business Basics

    LAW 9400-1

    Swanson, Carol

    3 credits.

    Closely-held companies are America's backbone; after all, 27 million small businesses represent 99% of all U.S. employers today. This seminar explores basic planning issues for these private entities, from the cradle to the grave, and will cover a broad array of practical topics, including raising capital, employee challenges, insurance considerations, and executive compensation. Students will also consider the lawyer's role in counseling business clients at critical junctures.

    Satisfies the ethics requirement for the BLI Certificate.

    A seminar is a rigorous writing experience requiring the production of a substantial research paper. Each student will complete at least one well-developed draft, which the professor will critique extensively. Each student will rewrite the draft(s) based on the faculty member's assessments.

    Enrollment in the seminar class cannot exceed 16 students.

    A student may take more than one seminar, but students who have not yet had a seminar have priority.

    Every Year Course