• Classroom Group Discussion

    Psychology Courses at Hamline University

    PSY 1330 - General Psychology

    Goals: To introduce the content and methods of the major areas of the science of psychology. To provide a foundation for the further study of psychology.

    Content: Physiological processes, perception, learning and memory, social processes, moral and intellectual development, behavioral pathology and treatment.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 1340 - Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

    Goals: To introduce the logic of statistical inference and apply that logic to statistical methods used in psychological research.

    Content: The statistical tests covered include the z test, the t test, the correlation test, the chi-square test, and analysis of variance.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1330 is recommended. Credit will not be given for both PSY 1340 and MGMT 1310 or PSY 1340 and MATH 1200.

    (This course was previously titled Quantitative Methods.)

    Credits: 4 credits 

    PSY 1430 - Sensation and Perception

    Goals: To introduce students to sensory systems (with primary emphasis on vision), how the functions of sensory mechanisms contribute to the structure of perceptual events, and how culture and learning shape the interpretative process we call perception.

    Content: Psychophysics, signal detection theory, vision, hearing, the skin senses (including pain), attention, and states of consciousness.

    Prerequisites: PSY 1330 and 1350 are recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 1440 - Lifespan Development

    Goals: To explore developmental theories and methods used to describe and examine typical physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional development across the lifespan.

    Content: Research methods, physical development (brain, motor, puberty, menopause, health and wellness), cognitive development (language, intelligence, school performance, memory processes), and socio-emotional development (sense of self, personality, well-being, relationships, threats to well-being).

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 1460 - Theories of Personality

    Goals: To provide an overview of major theories of personality; to evaluate theories of personality from a variety of psychological perspectives; to understand the application of theoretical principles to practical problems.

    Content: Major theories of personality are presented, with an emphasis on analyses of personality organization, development, assessment, and change. Major theories include psychoanalysis, trait models, humanistic models, and behavioral and cognitive approaches.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1330 or equivalent.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 1480 - Abnormal Psychology

    Goals: To introduce students to current views of psychopathology, problems in assessment and classification, general characteristics and etiology of disorders, and accepted treatment procedures.

    Content: Various forms of disordered behavior ranging from mild and common problems in living to seriously dysfunctional pathology; competing models for understanding disordered behavior, contemporary ethical issues in mental health.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1330 or equivalent.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 3350 - Research Methods in Psychology

    Goals: To understand the logic of experimental methodology, basic principles of experimental design, data analyses, limitations of experiments, and ethical considerations related to psychology research.

    Content: Correlational and experimental research methods, threats to good experimental design, and interpretation of results. Students conduct statistical analysis and write up their own experiment.

    Prerequisites: PSY 1330 (or equivalent) and PSY 1340.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 3410 - Theories of Learning

    Goals: To define learning and to show how the learning process is studied; to place learning theory in historical perspective, showing how answers to ancient questions about ideas gradually evolved into what we now refer to as modern learning theory.

    Content: The learning theories of Thorndike, Skinner, Hull, Pavlov, Guthrie, Estes, the Gestalt theorists, Piaget, Tolman, Bandura, and Hebb; the nature of learning, approaches to the study of learning, and early notions about learning; the application of learning principles to the solution of practical problems.

    Prerequisites: PSY 1330 or equivalent. PSY 1340 and PSY 1350 are recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 3420 - Cognitive Psychology

    Goals: To introduce the important insights and theoretical principles of modern cognitive science.

    Content: Students study evolution of human cognition, consciousness, perception and attention, memory, knowledge representation, language, reasoning, problem solving, cognitive development, learning, and individual differences in cognition.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1330 is recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 3440 - Advanced Child Development

    Goals: To provide a broad overview of theories of child development and research in child psychology. To encourage students to explore a single issue in developmental psychology in depth.

    Content: Research methods with children, genetics, learning and cognition development, moral development, socialization processes, family dynamics, and child-rearing.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1330.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 3510 - Psychology of Emotion

    Goals: To examine major psychological theories of emotion, emotional development, and emotional competence, from infancy through adulthood.

    Content: Individual differences in emotion, the role of emotions in social relationships, emotions across cultures, and emotions in psychopathology.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1330.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 3550 - Sleep, Dreams, and Consciousness

    Goals: To introduce students to research and theories in the field of waking consciousness, sleep, and dreams.

    Content: The course covers the nature and basis of human consciousness, the physiology and psychology of normal and disordered sleep, the function of sleep, the nature of dreaming, the meaning and function of dream content, and the waking imagination.

    Credits: 4 credits
     

    PSY 3570 - Neuropsychology

    Goals: To provide an understanding of the role of the brain in emotion, sleep, learning and memory, language, sexual behavior, aggression, and psychopathology.

    Content: Neural mechanisms, subcortical function, basic neuroendocrinology, drug effects and brain functions, models of pathology in schizophrenia and depression, and hemispheric specialization and language.

    Prerequisites: PSY 1330, PSY 1350, and PSY 1430 are strongly recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 3600 - Psychological Tests and Measurements

    Goals: To become familiar with issues in psychological testing such as validity and reliability, test development, item analysis, and the application of those concepts to evaluate achievement, aptitude, personality traits, personnel issues, and mental diagnosis.

    Content: Psychometric theory, psychological scaling and norm development, reliability and validity of psychological tests, test development and item analysis. Analysis of testing principles using examples of tests employed in achievement, personnel, personality, and mental evaluations. Students use statistical software in the development of their own testing instrument.

    Prerequisites: PSY 1330 or equivalent, and PSY 1340.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 3640 - Theories of Psychotherapy

    Goals: To provide an overview of the major approaches to psychotherapy; to compare and contrast models of psychotherapy; to become familiar with contemporary trends in psychotherapy.

    Content: Major theories of psychotherapy are presented, including psychoanalysis, humanistic and existential models, behavioral models, cognitive models, feminist and multicultural approaches, and integrative models.

    Prerequisites: PSY 1330 or equivalent, and either PSY 1460 or PSY 1480.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 3670 - Theories of Motivation

    Goals: To introduce students to a sampling of major theories of motivation with concentration on approaches most relevant to human behavior and to help them discover convergent positions and use motivation theory in self-discovery.

    Content: Psychodynamic theory, physiological mechanisms, achievement theory, attribution theory, organizational behavior, and aggression and altruism.

    Prerequisites: PSY 1330 and PSY 1350 are recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 3700 - Industrial/Organizational Psychology

    Goals: To familiarize the students with psychological theories and research applied to human behavior in organizational settings and to use this knowledge to solve problems in organizational behavior.

    Content: Learning theories applied to organizational settings; motivation, perception, and communication in work settings; the nature and impact of work related attitudes (especially job satisfaction); individual differences and organizational behavior; the causes, impact, and management of stress; group dynamics at work; organizational culture, leadership, and decision making.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1330 or equivalent.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 3740 - Disorders of Childhood

    Goals: To introduce students to current understandings of psychological disorders of childhood, problems in child assessment and classification, characteristics and etiology of disorders of childhood, and treatment options.

    Content: Descriptions of psychological disorders from infancy through adolescence; context of normal development; neurobiological, genetic, psychological, family, peer and cultural influences on disorders of childhood; ethical issues in assessment and treatment.

    Prerequisites: PSY 1330 or equivalent, and PSY 3440.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 3800 - Social Psychology

    Goals: To introduce the prominent social psychological theories and research relating to social behavior.

    Content: A survey of classic and contemporary theories in impression formation, person perception, prejudice and stereotyping, interpersonal attraction and relationships, altruism and aggression, conformity and persuasion, and group processes.

    Prerequisites: PSY 1330 or equivalent; PSY 1340 recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 3820 - Cross-Cultural Psychological Science

    Goals: To examine research and theory on cross-cultural psychology from international and domestic perspectives. To gain an overview of how cross-cultural issues relate to and affect different areas of psychology and to present methods psychologists use to study culture and its effects on behavior and emotion (from social psychology to clinical psychology).

    Content: Topics include (but are not limited to) cultural universality and specificity of psychological theories, ethnic identity, cultural variations in human development, personality, emotion, cognition, social interactions and psychopathology, psychology of immigration and acculturation, mindfulness-based approaches, and psychological assessment and treatment of culturally diverse populations.

    Prerequisites: PSY 1330 and PSY 1340.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 3840 - College Drinking and Alcoholism: Psychological Theory and Research

    Goals: To examine research and theory on the causes and consequences of alcoholism, drinking to get drunk, heavy drinking, and binge drinking.

    Content: A wide variety of perspectives on alcoholism and college drinking will be covered including (but not limited to) behavioral genetics, neuroscience, clinical psychological treatment and prevention, psychophysiological research, environmental factors, psychiatry, epidemiological, social, emotional, attitudinal, and experimental studies. Students engage in psychological data analysis, write-up and interpretation of real data sets on addiction, alcohol and drug use, and read and critique research articles on the topic.

    Prerequisites: PSY 1330 and PSY 1340

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 3950 - History of Psychology

    Goals: To provide information that will allow the student to place modern psychology in historical perspective and thus to see it as a dynamic, evolving body of information that is subject to emotional and societal factors and is often characterized by fads and fashions.

    Content: Early Greek philosophy; after Aristotle: a search for the good life; beginnings of modern psychology; empiricism, associationism, materialism, and positivism; rationalism, romanticism, and existentialism, early developments in physiology and the rise of experimental psychology; structuralism: psychology’s first school; the Darwinian influence; functionalism; behaviorism, neobehaviorism; Gestalt psychology; early treatment of the mentally ill and the events leading to the development of psychoanalysis; psychoanalysis; third force psychology; and psychology today.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1330 or equivalent.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 5550 - Seminar: Sleep, Dreams, and Consciousness

    Goals: To introduce students to research and theories in the field of waking consciousness, sleep, and dreams.

    Content: The course covers the nature and basis of human consciousness, the physiology and psychology of normal and disordered sleep, the function of sleep, the nature of dreaming, the meaning and function of dream content, and the waking imagination.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 5570 - NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY

    Goals: To explore, in depth, the activating and organizing effects of hormones and the effects of environmental and psychological events as they affect endocrine function.

    Content: Stress effects on immune function, memory, and reproductive fitness. Endocrine function in sexual development, gender identity, and sexual behavior. Other areas include aggression, love, and mating.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 5600 - Seminar: Advanced Topics in Social Psychology

    Goals: To examine a specific topic in the area of social psychology such as an in-depth analysis of aggressive behavior as addressed by social psychological research.

    Content: Variable from year to year.

    Prerequisites: PSY 1330 or equivalent, PSY 1340, with 28 credits in psychology or senior standing.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 5700 - Seminar: Clinical Psychology

    Goals: To introduce students to the field of clinical psychology as a science and a profession; to review theoretical models of psychopathology and intervention; to explore professional issues related to mental health services; to integrate, evaluate, and reflect on previous coursework within the framework of an advanced seminar in psychology.

    Content: Contemporary approaches to clinical psychology; theoretical and practical issues in clinical education, ethics, and intervention; individual topics selected by students.

    Prerequisites: PSY 1460 or PSY 1480, PSY 3640, with 28 credits or senior standing.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 5720 - Applied Health Psychology

    Goals: This seminar is designed to examine the interrelationships between behavior, emotion, health and psychological disorders and dysfunction. Students will be introduced to the assessment, treatment and causes of physical and psychological health issues.

    Content: The role of the practicing psychologist in a medical setting will be discussed and how psychologists function in the context of health care settings will be a major focus of the course (ranging from ethics to assessment and treatment) and we will examine how they operate with other medical professionals. Emphasis will be on clinical intervention and assessment of physical and mental disorders in context.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 5730 - Behavioral Genetics

    Goals: To examine the methods, basic principles, and research of individual differences, while exploring the impact of genetic and environmental influences on behaviors of psychological relevance.

    Content: Research methods, basic genetic principles, gene and environmental processes, cognitive disabilities, general and specific cognitive abilities, adult psychopathology, developmental psychopathology, personality and personality disorders, typical behavioral development, and health psychology and aging.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 5750 - Seminar: Positive Psychology

    Goals: To critically examine the topic of positive psychology. To incorporate and expand on areas of research and applications related to human health and adaption.

    Content: Variable from year to year.

    Prerequisites: 28 credits in psychology or senior standing.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 5760 - Seminar: Advanced Topics in Cognitive Psychology

    Goals: To examine a specific topic in the area of cognitive psychology, such as scientific inquiry into the nature of the unconscious mind.

    Content: The course focuses on class discussion and includes an individual research project.

    Prerequisites: 28 credits in psychology or senior standing.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 5770 - Seminar: Human Judgment and Decision Making

    Goals: To acquaint the student with the psychological factors involved in decision making and gambling, to introduce the student to the use of mathematical models in psychology, and to help the student gain fluency in application of models to real data.

    Content: Psychological decision theory, subjective probability, game theory, measurement, gambling, complexity theory, and experimental aesthetics.

    Prerequisites: PSY 1330, PSY 1340, PSY 1350, with 28 credits in psychology or senior standing.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 5880 - Honors Research Seminar I

    Goals: To begin research for departmental honors.

    Content: Principles of experimental design, statistical analysis of data, completion of a literature review and research proposal in area of student’s interest, analysis of theory.

    Prerequisites: PSY 1340, PSY 1350, and admission by application and approval of department sponsor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSY 5890- Honors Research Seminar II

    Goals: To complete research for departmental honors, to produce a paper in publishable APA format, and to orally present research results.

    Prerequisite: PSY 5880.

    Credits: 4 credits