• Political Science

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    Political Science
    MS-B1805
    Hamline University
    1536 Hewitt Avenue
    Saint Paul, MN 55104

    651-523-2295

    Joseph Peschek
    Department Chair
    651-523-2260
    jpeschek@hamline.edu 

     

  • Student in Classroom

    Political Science Courses at Hamline

    PSCI 1110 - American Government and Politics

    Goals: To introduce students to analytical concepts and frameworks for the study of American national government and politics, especially as it relates to the question of who gets what, how, and why.

    Content: The constitutional framework; political values and public opinion; the role of parties, interest groups and mass media; Congress, the judiciary and the presidency; the policy process in selected substantive areas such as defense, foreign policy, economic management, and civil liberties.

    Taught: Annually.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 1430 - World Politics

    Goals: To introduce students to major issues in contemporary international relations and varying approaches to studying them, including the role of the state and non-state actors and sources of conflict and cooperation in world politics.

    Content: The role of the nation-state, international organizations, and other non-state actors; determinants of state behavior; international conflict; global patterns of economic development and trade; ecological political challenges; and the role of the U.S. in a changing global environment.

    Taught: Annually.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 1500 - Parties and Elections in the United States

    Goals: To achieve a sound understanding of the impact and role of political parties, voting, and elections upon American government and public policy.

    Content: The role of parties and elections in democratic politics, party organization and leadership, campaigns, money and the media, voters and nonvoters, party change, and political realignment.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1110 required or by Instructor Permission.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3010 - Presidential Politics

    Goals: To achieve a clear understanding of the role of the presidency in the U.S. Political system. To explore how the presidency has been affected by political, social, and economic developments.

    Content: Presidential selection process; White House decision making; the role of presidential personality and style; White House relations with Congress, the bureaucracy, political parties, and pressure groups; role of the presidency in selected policy areas such as national security and economic policy; the impact of public opinion and mass media on the presidency; the problem of presidential power–too much or too little?

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1110 required or by Instructor Permission.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3020 - International Political Economy

    Goals: To explore the theory and practice of international political economy and the intersection of political science and economics. To understand the evolution of the international monetary system and international trade policy. To consider the interaction of political authority and markets in the global economy.

    Content: Neo-classical growth models; dependency theory; politics of growth and industrialization; comparative perspective of industrialization (e.g., developmental successes and failures); international regimes; financial crises and structural adjustments.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1430: World Politics is recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3030 - American Foreign Policy

    Goals: To achieve a sound understanding of the pattern and process of American foreign policy in a changing world and to comprehend the analytic perspectives that enhance such understanding.

    Content: Patterns of post-1945 foreign policy during the Cold War; social, economic, and ideological sources of U.S. policy; the foreign policy-making process; challenges to American policy in a post-Cold War world; the politics of globalization and counter-terrorism.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1110 required or by Instructor Permission.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3430 - Gender Politics

    Goals: To examine approaches to gender issues, the role of women in politics, and the impact of feminism from a comparative perspective. To consider development and importance of women’s organizations worldwide.

    Content: Current research and theories about women and politics. Examination of the role of women in politics in various regions of the world such as Latin America, Asia, Middle East, Africa, and Europe as well as the United States.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1430: World Politics is recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3540 - Political Research and Analysis

    Goals: To introduce fundamental concepts of politics and contemporary methods of political analysis and research.

    Content: The development of political science as a discipline, various theories and approaches in political analysis, methods of research in political science, and practical experience in empirical analysis.

    Taught: Annually.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3550 - International Organizations

    Goals: To explore the foundations of international governmental and nongovernmental organizations; through case studies and policy issues, to discuss the United Nations and its affiliated groups; to examine how transitional actors have tried to deal with critical world issues such as hunger, environmental dilemmas, human rights, and the disparities of development.

    Content: This course includes a discussion of theories of integration, histories of international organizations, and analyses of approaches to policy and politics in the international arena. Students will also have the opportunity to do informal interviews or mentoring projects with local international organizations.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1430: World Politics is recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3570 - Ethnic and Civil Conflict

    Goals: To explore the use of ethnic identities as a source of collective political mobilization. To examine the implications of ethnic conflicts for global peace and for the present character of the state.

    Content: Emphasis on theoretical works and selected case studies from the contemporary world. Students will be encouraged to develop independent perspectives regarding both the sources of ethno-national politicization in the contemporary world and viable means of minimizing prospects that such politicization will contribute to tension and conflict with members of other groups that are perceived as distinct. Extensive case studies will be drawn from various parts of the world.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3580 - Politics and Society in the Middle East

    Goals: To examine politics and society in the contemporary Middle East, within the context of the region’s historical, cultural, and economic environment. To understand both the major themes and issues in Middle Eastern politics and the diverse experiences of individual countries (e.g., Egypt, Israel, Syria, Saudi Arabia).

    Content: Islam, Arab, and Ottoman Empire, the colonial legacy and nationalist movements, Arab nationalism, the Arab-Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the impact of ethnic and religious diversity on politics, and Middle Eastern foreign policies and the impact of external and regional development.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3590 - Government and Politics of Western Europe and the European Union

    Goals: To examine and analyze the political systems of Great Britain, France, Germany, Spain, Italy, Scandinavia, and other European states with reference to their social and economic contexts. To understand the development of the European Union and the desire for European integration.

    Content: Post-World War II development of European political systems, state institutions, political culture, and policy processes; established parties and alternative social movements; relations with the United States and Eastern Europe; development of EU and implications of European integration.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1430: World Politics is recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3600 - Model United Nations

    Goals: Through this course, students will develop research, critical thinking, and team-building skills; students will also gain perspectives on the role of international organizations and nongovernmental organizations in the international community. Students will gain an appreciation for diverse cultures, modes of negotiation and conflict resolution, and the professional nature of diplomacy.

    Content: This course is designed to help prepare students to serve as delegates to the National Model United Nations Conference in New York. Students will also have the opportunity to visit other international agencies and NGOs (non-governmental organizations) in New York as well as volunteer with organizations in the Twin Cities. Topics discussed in the class will include: the nature of diplomacy, how nations interact, the operations of the United Nations system, the role of NGOs, and case studies of individual countries which the team will represent at the simulation in New York. Students will engage in mock debates and discussions of UN policy initiatives. By discussing the work of the UN and NGOs, students will also gain an understanding of a variety of transnational issues such as arms control, security, HIV/AIDS, environmental protection, child labor, etc.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisites: permission of instructor; PSCI 1430 is recommended; acceptance to Model UN team.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3610 - Politics and Society in the Asian Pacific Region

    Goals: To explore politics, government, and society in Asian Pacific region. To understand both the major themes and issues in Asian Pacific politics and the diverse experiences of individual countries.

    Content: National legacy, state or nation building, constitution and government structure; policy processes and the relationship between government and society; the impact of external and regional forces on individual countries.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1430: World Politics is recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3620 - Government and Politics of Central/Eastern Europe and Russia

    Goals: To examine and analyze the political systems of Albania, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Russia, and the former states of Yugoslavia. To understand the social, economic, and ideological contexts of these political systems in the postwar era and their movement toward economic and political transition.

    Content: Postwar development of Eastern European political systems, state institutions, political culture, and policy processes; relations with the United States, Europe, and Russia, with particular emphasis on changes after 1989.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1430: World Politics is recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3630 - American Political Thought

    Goals: To understand the nature and significance of the main currents of American political thought from the 17th century to the present; to explore the historically developing relationships between liberalism, capitalism, democracy, conservatism, and radicalism in the United States.

    Content: Careful study of mainstream thinkers and documents (Jefferson, Lincoln, the Constitution) as well as dissident voices (Frederick Douglass, Emma Goldman, the anti-Federalists). Emphasis on the social and economic context of political thought.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3640 - Contemporary Political Ideologies

    Goals: To examine various political ideologies from a comparative and historical perspective. To consider the manner in which ideas are transformed into action.

    Content: Examination of the foundation, content, and impact of recognized ideologies such as socialism, communism, anarchism, fascism, feminism, environmentalism, and liberalism.

    Taught: Annually.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3650 - Western Political Thought

    Goals: To comprehend the nature and significance of the tradition of Western political thought; to develop the skills to critically analyze and evaluate contributions to the field; to explore the relevance of political theory for understanding contemporary politics and clarifying one’s own political perspective.

    Content: Analysis of the tradition of political discourse from Plato and Aristotle in ancient Greece to Marx and Mill in the 19th century, including such thinkers as Machiavelli, Locke, and Rousseau. Emphasis on issues related to democratic theory, economy and property, and political change.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits


    PSCI 3680 - Politics and Society in Developing Areas

    Goals: To examine politics in developing countries from a comparative perspective and to study existing approaches to issues of political legitimation and stability, economic development, and the relationship between politics and economics in the non-Western world.

    Content: The colonial legacy and the emergence of states in the developing world, approaches to studying the non-Western state, processes of political development, the nature of political leadership and problems of political legitimation, theories of political change and economic development, and the role of developing countries in the world.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3690 - Politics of Urban and Metropolitan America

    Goals: To introduce analytical concepts and frameworks for the study of urban and metropolitan problems.

    Content: The emergence of metropolitan American and urban political systems. Special focus on ethnic and racial politics; local political engagement; community elites; urban political economies; political problems of metropolitan areas; urban reform and planning.

    Taught: Annually.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3700 - Public Policy and Public Administration

    Goals: To learn how to think critically and analytically about the formulation and implementation of public policy. To acquaint students with some of the more important concepts, issues, and problems in public administration.

    Content: Policy formation and analysis; causes and consequences of policy selection and design; effective leadership; challenges associated with bureaucracy, successful administration and policy implementation; understanding and formulating research on public policy and administration.

    Taught: Annually.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3710 - Political, Economic, and Social Development in China

    Goals: To examine two distinctive pathways of political, social, and economic development in China (Chinese mainland and Taiwan). To explore political, economic, and social structures in the region. To consider the impact of Chinese development on the region and Sino-U.S. relations.

    Content: Post World War II political history of modern China; the similarities and differences of China’s and Taiwan’s political, social, and economic developmental strategies; governmental, social, and economic institutions and patterns; the transformation of relations between state and society; relations with the United States.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1430: World Politics is recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3720 - Political Violence: War, Revolution, and Terrorism

    Goals: To examine the theory and practice of various types of political violence and their transforming impact on state, society, and the world. To understand what factors drive people to revolt and the relationship between power and violence. To consider the impact of the state’s reaction to political violence.

    Content: The causes of political violence; patterns of violent activity; issues of political symbolism, coercion, and legitimacy; state and people’s strategies for dealing with political violence (e.g., revolution and counterrevolution; terrorism and counterterrorism); analyses of global terrorism in the 21st century.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1430: World Politics is recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3730 - Democracy, Authoritarianism, and Democratization

    Goals: To explore the theory and practice of democracy, authoritarianism, and democratization in various regions and states of the world.

    Content: Definitions of democracy; types of authoritarian states and power structures; theory or models of regime change; process of democratic transformation (e.g., liberalization, transition, and consolidation); patterns of regime change (top down or bottom up), “economics first” or “politics first” or dual transition theories.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1430: World Politics is recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 3740 - Political Psychology

    Goals: To explore the intersection of political science and social psychology using a comparative perspective. To analyze how citizens from a variety of cultural and governmental contexts think and feel about politics. To examine thought processes of political leaders, probing to discover why leaders make decisions that they do. To learn about research areas associated with political psychology and ways scholars go about testing their theories about political behavior.

    Content: Personality and politics, right and left wing authoritarianism, altruism, stereotyping and prejudice, political culture, social capital and community involvement, influence of mass media, groupthink, interplay of public opinion and elite decision making, methodologies associated with political psychology (experimentation, opinion polls, in-depth interviews, and focus groups).

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1110: American Government is recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 5000 - Senior Seminar

    Goals: To enable majors to synthesize prior learning in Political Science through a senior capstone experience. To provide opportunities for intensive research and discussion of select topics in contemporary U.S. and global politics.

    Content: Topics will rotate annually. Each year the seminar will focus on a specific, substantive area of politics and policy, at international, national, or local levels. Examples of topics include economic globalization, the impact of welfare reform, and advanced topics in democratic theory and social justice. Students will be expected to engage in and present the results of a major research project that integrates the central learning goals of the discipline with the substantive focus of the seminar.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisites: PSCI 3540 and senior status.

    Credits: 4 credits

    PSCI 5100 - Senior Practicum

    Goals: To enable senior majors to explore connections between theory and practice in Political Science by combining academic analysis and learning with field experience.

    Content: Seniors taking this course will be expected to obtain a semester internship in the Twin Cities (120 hours of work) with either a governmental agency, non-profit, international NGO, political organization, or business. The course will be the “academic” portion of the internship. Each week students will be reading current articles in political science and discussing them in light of their internships. Students will engage in applied research on a topic related to their internship and be responsible for completing a substantial research paper by the end of the semester. The writing process will include creating a research proposal, outline, and drafts of the project. Other assignments will include a weekly internship journal and oral presentation of the research project at the end of the semester. Upon successful completion, the * in the course title will include the actual Internship title on the official transcript of the student.

    Taught: Annually, in spring term.

    Prerequisites: PSCI 3540 and permission of instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

  • News
    • The Hamline to Hamline Collaboration is offering grants for collaborative programming and/or events that enrich the collaboration between Hamline Elementary and Hamline University. Applications are due by May 12th, 2014.
    • Senior Jenna Potter, an English major and German and communications double minor at Hamline, was awarded the prestigious Fulbright Scholarship to teach in Hamburg, Germany. Senior Libby Otto named as alternate to Norway.
    • A group of 43 undergraduate students and faculty attended the 2014 National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR) in Lexington, KY from April 2 through April 5. Students presented 35 different projects that resulted from their collaborative research at Hamline.
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