• Physics

  • Questions? 

    Department of Physics
    MS-B1807
    Hamline University
    1536 Hewitt Avenue
    Saint Paul, MN 55104

    651-523-2291

    Bruce Bolon
    Department Chair
    651-523-2192
     bbolon@hamline.edu  


     

  • Kay Malmstrom Lecture in Physics

    2006 Lecture

     Malmstrom 2006

    Eric Mazur

    Harvard College Professor, Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics, and Professor of Physics at Harvard University.

    Lecture Title: Stopping time

    An internationally recognized scientist and researcher, he leads a vigorous research program in optical physics and supervises one of the largest research groups in the Physics Department at Harvard University.

    In addition to his work in optical physics, Dr. Mazur is interested in education, science policy, outreach, and the public perception of science. He believes that better science education for all -- not just science majors -- is vital for continued scientific progress. To this end, Dr. Mazur devotes part of his research group's effort to education research and finding verifiable ways to improve science education. In 1990 he began developing Peer Instruction a method for teaching large lecture classes interactively. Dr. Mazur's teaching method has developed a large following, both nationally and internationally, and has been adopted across many science disciplines.

    Time is of philosophical interest as well as the subject of mathematical and scientific research. Even though it is a concept familiar to most, the passage of time remains one of the greatest enigmas of the universe. The philosopher Augustine once said: "What then is time? If no one asks me, I know what it is. If I wish to explain it to him who asks me, I do not know." The concept time indeed cannot be explained in simple terms. Emotions, life, and death - all are related to our interpretation of the irreversible flow of time. After a discussion of the concept of time, we will review historical attempts to "stop time," i.e., to capture events of very short duration and then present an overview of current research into ultrafast processes using short laser pulses.