• Hamline Malmstrom Lecture 2016 Soft Electronics for the Human Body

    25th Annual Kay Malmstrom Lecture in Physics

    Friday, November 4, 2016 at 12:45 p.m.
    Sundin Music Hall, 1531 Hewitt Avenue, Saint Paul

    Soft Electronics for the Human Body

    Guest Lecturer

    John A. RogersJohn A. Rogers, Ph.D.
    Louis Simpson and Kimberly Querrey Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, and Medicine
    Director of the Center for Bio-Integrated Electronics
    Northwestern University

    Biology is soft, curvilinear and transient; modern semiconductor technologies are rigid, planar and everlasting. Electronic and optoelectronic systems that eliminate this profound mismatch in properties create opportunities for devices that can intimately integrate with the body, for diagnostic, therapeutic or surgical function with important, unique capabilities in biomedical research and clinical healthcare. Over the last decade, a convergence of new concepts in mechanical engineering, materials science, electrical engineering and advanced manufacturing has led to the emergence of diverse, novel classes of 'biocompatible' electronic platforms. This talk describes the key ideas, with examples ranging from wireless, skin-like electronic 'tattoos' for continuous monitoring of physiological health, to multiplexed, conformal sensor sheets for mapping cardiac electrophysiology, to bioresorbable intracranial sensors for treating traumatic brain injury.

    About John A. Rogers

    Professor John A. Rogers obtained BA and BS degrees in chemistry and in physics from the University of Texas, Austin, in 1989. From MIT, he received SM degrees in physics and in chemistry in 1992 and the PhD degree in physical chemistry in 1995. From 1995 to 1997, Rogers was a Junior Fellow in the Harvard University Society of Fellows. He joined Bell Laboratories as a Member of Technical Staff in the Condensed Matter Physics Research Department in 1997, and served as Director of this department from the end of 2000 to 2002. He then spent thirteen years on the faculty at University of Illinois, most recently as the Swanlund Chair Professor and Director of the Seitz Materials Research Laboratory. 

    In 2016, he joined Northwestern University as the Louis Simpson and Kimberly Querrey Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Biomedical Engineering and Medicine. His research has been recognized by many awards including a MacArthur Fellowship (2009), the Lemelson-MIT Prize (2011), the MRS Mid-Career Researcher Award (2013), the Smithsonian Award for American Ingenuity in the Physical Sciences (2013), and the ETH Zurich Chemical Engineering Medal (2015). He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Inventors and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

  • About the Malmstrom Lectures in Physics

    The Kay Malmstrom Lecture in Physics, part of the Emma K. and Carl R. N. Malstrom Chair in Physics, is an annual symposium on contemporary issues and research in physics. Through this generous gift, Carl R. N. Malmstrom ’36 gives Hamline students access to the outstanding scientific minds of our time. Even after his death in 2010, Carl’s legacy of supporting Hamline students continues to fund collaborative research opportunities, scholarships, and this lecture.

  • Past Lectures

    2015

    "More Than Moore: When Electronics Drive off the Roadmap." Dr. Mark A. Reed

    2014

    "Relativity, Quantum Physics, and Graphene." Philip Kim

    2012

    "When Freezing Cold is Not Cold Enough: New Forms of Matter Close to Absolute Zero Temperature." Dr. Wolfgang Ketterle

    2011

    Spring: "Exploring the Warped Side of the Universe." Dr. Nergis Malvalvala

    2011

    Fall: "E=mc^2: Opening Windows on the World." Dr. Young-Kee Kim

    2010

    "Neutrino Astronomy at the South Pole." Dr. Jordan Goodman

    2009 

    "Superposition, Entanglement, and Raising Schrödinger’s Cat" Dr. David Wineland

    2008

     

    "How to Make Atoms Sing and Molecules Dance-Using Fast Light Pulses to Observe and Control Nature" Dr. Margaret Murnane

    2007

    "Modern Cosmology & Superstring Theory: Can They Co-Exist?" Dr. Sylvester James Gates, Jr.

    2006

     

    "Stopping Time" Dr. Eric Mazur

    2005

    Malstrom Lecture - 2005 Dr. Ramon Lopez

    2004

    "Stone Cold Science" Dr. Eric Cornell. 2001 Nobel Laureate for collaborative work involving Bose-Einstein Condensate.

    2003

     

    "Our Preposterous Universe" Dr. Sean Carroll

    2002

    "Sunlight and Ice Crystals in the Skies of Antarctica" Dr. Robert Greenler

    2001

     

    "The Physics of Star Trek" Dr. Lawrence Krauss

    2000

    "Almost Absolute Zero: The Story of Laser Cooling and Trapping." Dr. William D. Phillips of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. 1997 Nobel Laureate for collaborative work involving the cooling and trapping of atoms with lasers.

    1999

    "Space Astronomy in the 21st Century" Dr. John C. Mather. Nasa Goddard Lab for Astronomy and Solar Physics.

    1998

     

    "Voodoo Science" Dr. Robert Park. University of Maryland, author of the controversial weekly commentary, What's New, on science policy issues.

    1997

    "Quark-The Big And Small Of It" Dr. Melissa Franklin. Harvard University, The Top Quark.

    1996

    "So Many Galaxies... So Little Time" Dr. Margaret Geller Harvard University, Astronomer, recipient the MacArthur Fellowship.

    1995

    "The Quark And The Jaguar" Dr. Murray Gell-Mann. 1969 Nobel Laureate for classifying the elementary particles.

    1994

    "Science And The Human Condition" Dr. Daniel Kleppner MIT, quantum optics, and experimental atomic physics.

    1993

    "Rumors of Perfection: New Ideas About Cosmic Evolution" Timothy Ferris. Science writer and essayist, wrote and narrated the the PBS special "The Creation of the Universe."

    1992

     

    "The Cosmic Quark" Dr. Leon Lederman. 1988 Nobel Laureate for collaborative work that led to development of a new tool for studying the weak nuclear force.

    1991

    (Dedication of Robbins Science Building.) Dr. Arno A. Penzias. 1978 Nobel Laureate with Robert K. Wilson for discovering the cosmic background radiation.