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    Latin American Studies Courses at Hamline

    LSTD 5000 - Latin American Studies

    Goals: To expose the student to contemporary Latin American problems and examine how Latin America attempts to solve them, how the United States attempts to help solve them and how the two solutions often conflict.

    Content: United States response to rebellion, reform and revolution in Mexico (1910), Guatemala (1954), and Cuba (1959), and in other Latin American countries striving for social change. An analysis and discussion of debts, boycotts, loans, coups, invasions, and intervention from 1910 to present.

    Taught: Annually.

    Credits: 4 credits 

    LSTD 5100 - Contemporary Issues in the Americas

    Goals: The primary objective of this course is to further our understanding of the Americas by studying many of the political, social, economic, and historical forces affecting the region today. Through this course students will come to appreciate the complex interrelatedness of these and other issues, and the necessity, in this new era of the “global village,” for international relations to be founded on knowledge, understanding, and respect.

    Content: Through a case study approach we will examine how certain issues are played out in specific countries. For example, we will look at Mexico as we try to understand the phenomena of migration and urbanization; in Argentina and Brazil we will engage issues of authoritarianism and models of economic development; the examples of Peru and El Salvador will teach us about revolution; Chile will introduce to the changing role of Latin American women; and nations of the Caribbean will serve as case studies on race and ethnicity. Specific case studies may vary from year to year.

    Taught: Annually.

    This course is not recommended for first-year students.

    Credits: 4 credits