• English

  • Classroom Group Discussion

    English Courses at Hamline University

    ENG 1100 - English for International Students

    Goals: As preparation for ENG 1110 the course will help international students develop the writing skills necessary for college-level course work.

    Content: Focus on writing and rewriting with an emphasis on the particular needs of non-native speakers of English.

    Taught: Annually.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 1110 - Writing and Reading Texts

    Goals: To develop critical writing, reading, and thinking skills needed in academic courses in order to achieve greater effectiveness and analysis in writing. To understand the dynamic relationship between language and culture and to begin to explore how one is shaped by language and shapes the world through language.

    Content: Critically reading a variety of literary, nonliterary, and visual texts and developing research skills for providing cultural, social, political, and historical contexts. Frequent writing and rewriting in a variety of genres, at least one of which includes research strategies and incorporation of sources. Focus on the elements of successful written communication, including invention, purpose, audience, organization, grammar, and conventions.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisites: None. Required of all first-year students. Open to others with permission of the department. ENG 1110 does not apply to the English major but instead counts toward a student’s breadth of study.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 1210 - British Literatures to 1789

    Goals: To survey British literature to 1789 in its cultural and intellectual contexts.

    Content: Selected works by such authors as Geoffrey Chaucer, Margery Kempe, Edmund Spenser, William Shakespeare, John Donne, John Milton, Andrew Marvell, and Jonathan Swift.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: ENG 1110 or its equivalent, or concurrent registration.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 1220 - British Literatures after 1789

    Goals: To survey British literature after 1789 in its cultural and intellectual contexts.

    Content: Selected works by authors such as Mary Wollstonecraft, William Wordsworth, Jane Austen, Robert Browning, Oscar Wilde, Virginia Woolf, and Tom Stoppard.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: ENG 1110 or its equivalent, or concurrent registration.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 1230 - American Literatures to 1860

    Goals: To survey American literature to 1860 in its cultural and intellectual contexts.

    Content: Literary forms such as sermon, oral narrative, autobiography, journals, essays, poetry, and fiction. Possible authors and texts: Native American poetry and tales, Cabeza de Vaca, Mary Rowlandson, Sor Juana, Benjamin Franklin, William Apess, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, and Walt Whitman.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: ENG 1110 or its equivalent, or concurrent registration.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 1240 - American Literatures after 1860 

    Goals: To survey American literature from about 1860 to the present in its cultural and intellectual contexts.

    Content: Literary forms such as the novel, poetry, and drama that develop themes such as the rise of the city, changing social and personal values, industrialism, and individual alienation. Possible authors: Mark Twain, Kate Chopin, Langston Hughes, William Faulkner, Adrienne Rich, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Maxine Hong Kingston.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: ENG 1110 or its equivalent, or concurrent registration.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 1250 - World Literatures

    Goals: To survey literatures of the world in their cultural and intellectual contexts.

    Content: Selections and emphasis will vary from semester to semester. Students will gain understanding of literary forms such as the novel, drama, poetry, and essay in different cultural contexts. Typical topics for discussion may include the cross-cultural comparison of forms, colonial and postcolonial experiences, and the effects of globalization.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: ENG 1110 or its equivalent, or concurrent registration.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 1270 - African-American Literatures

    Goals: To survey African-American literary tradition as influenced by oral and written forms of expression. To heighten the student’s awareness of the particularity of African-American cultural expression as well as its connections with mainstream American writing.

    Content: Selections of texts may vary from semester to semester. Typically, the course will survey prose, poetry, and drama from the 18th to the 20th centuries. Selected works by such authors as Phillis Wheatley, David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Frances Harper, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Du Bois, James Weldon Johnson, Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Jean Toomer, Sterling Brown, Richard Wright, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Lorraine Hansberry, and Alice Childress.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: ENG 1110 or its equivalent, or concurrent registration.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 3010 - Textual Studies and Criticism

    Goals: To introduce readers to a critical relationship with literary form that is the foundation of the discipline of English. The course investigates literature and writing as a site of cultural production and consumption, leading to a self-reflexive development of critical thinking through the close reading of texts in different genres. Students acquire critical terminology and practice interpretive strategies.

    Content: Close reading of and writing about selected works from various cultures, genres, and periods.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: Strongly recommended that one survey course (1210, 1220, 1230, 1240, 1250, 1270) be completed or taken concurrently.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 3020 - Literary and Cultural Theory

    Goals: To introduce students to theoretical approaches to texts and to the practical applications of literary theory. Students should take this gateway course in the sophomore year in conjunction with declaring a major/minor. This course builds on the learning experiences introduced in ENG 1110, the surveys, and ENG 3010: Textual Studies and Criticism and prepares students for success in 3000-level writing and literature courses and the senior seminar. Required for many 3000-level courses.

    Content: Reading and discussing representative 20th-century critical approaches to the study and understanding of written texts and producing analytical essays that apply critical methods to selected texts.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisites: One survey course (ENG 1210, 1220, 1230, 1240, 1250, 1270) completed. While in rare cases ENG 3020 may be taken concurrently with ENG 3010, it is strongly encouraged for student success that ENG 3010 be completed first. Not recommended for first-year students. Nonmajors and nonminors need the permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 3100 - Introduction to African-American Studies

    Crosslisted as PHIL 3100.

    Goals: To develop an understanding of several key issues in African American Studies emphasizing close textural reading and analysis. Additionally, students participate in academic service learning to synthesize textual and experimental learning.

    Content: The course materials will focus on critical readings about construction of race as a concept; intersections of race, class and gender; Afrocentrism; pan-africanism; diasporic connections; nationalism; religious dimension; literary theory and popular culture.

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 3190 - Introduction to Linguistics 

    Goals: To examine the scientific study of language and language analysis.

    Content: Analysis of language in terms of phonetics and phonology (sounds), morphology (word formation), semantics (the meaning system), syntax (sentences and their structure), and language change. Discussion of the relationship between language and neurology, psychology, society, and culture.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisites: ENG 1110 or equivalent; ENG 3020 recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 3320 - Fundamentals of Journalism

    Goals: To develop skills in writing for mass media.

    Content: Techniques and practice of news, feature, and interpretive reporting combined with reading and discussion of principles and ethics of journalism.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: ENG 1110 or equivalent.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 3330 - Special Topics in Journalism

    Goals: To explore special topics in news reporting and writing.

    Content: Build on basic writing techniques and formats with concentration on interviewing, fact gathering, editing, and design. Exposure to print, broadcast, or online media. Topics vary. Check section title and description.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: ENG 1110 or equivalent. ENG 3320 is recommended.

    A student may register for this course more than once for different topics.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 3340 - Organizational Writing

    Goals: To develop strategies for writing in organizations.

    Content: Focus on inter- and intra-organizational correspondence, proposals, and reports, with emphasis on the principles and techniques for writing in for profit and non-profit organizations—business, government, and industry.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisites: ENG 1110 or equivalent. Senior status recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 3370 - Topics in Professional Writing

    Goals: An intensive study in a particular area of professional writing.

    Content: Based upon the principles and practices of professional writing and communication, this course requires that students write for multiple, complex audiences and purposes. Topics vary. Check section title and description. Examples include “research and report writing,” “writing for new media” and “professional and technical writing.”

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: ENG 1110 or its equivalent. A student may register for this course more than once for different topics.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 3390 - Advanced Writing: Exposition and Argumentation

    Goals: To study and acquire power in textual production through reflective reading and writing across genres, discourses, audiences, and purposes.

    Content: Studies of writing that maintain (or subvert) the status quo, addressing particularly the influences of culture, gender, class, race, disability, and other categories that define identity and community. Course focus is on expository and argumentative writing—broadly defined—and may be organized around a single category. Recent examples include environment and place, public policy, and disability studies.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: ENG 1110 or its equivalent. A student may register for this course more than once for different topics.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 3450 - Studies in Literatures Across Cultures

    Goals: A critical study of a specific topic in world literature.

    Content: Intensive analysis of texts in their cultural contexts. Topics vary from year to year. Recent examples: passages to India, the empire writes back, Harlem renaissance, pan-African oratory, 20th-century Irish literature.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisites: ENG 3010. ENG 3020 strongly recommended. A student may register for this course more than once for different topics.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 3510 - Studies in a Single Author

    Goals: A critical study of a specific author.

    Content: Intensive analysis of texts in their cultural contexts. Topics vary from year to year. Examples include Toni Morrison, James Baldwin, Edmund Spenser, John Milton.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisites: ENG 3010. ENG 3020 strongly recommended. A student may register for this course more than once for different topics.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 3530 - Studies in British Literatures

    Goals: A critical study of a specific topic in British literature.

    Content: Intensive analysis of texts in their cultural contexts. Topics vary from year to year. Recent examples: medieval lowlife, Arthurian legends, Renaissance drama, Romantic poetry, Victorian novel, modernism, contemporary novel.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisites: ENG 3010. ENG 3020 (may be taken concurrently). A student may register for this course more than once for different topics.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 3540 - Studies in American Literatures

    Goals: A critical study of a specific topic or period in American literature.

    Content: Intensive analysis of texts in their cultural contexts. Topics vary from year to year. Recent examples: American Literature of Landscape and Nature; Walt Whitman and Modern American Poetry; Beats, Bop, and the Status Quo; Comedy and Postmodernism; Women’s Bildungsroman and Kunstlerroman; Science and Literature.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisites: ENG 3010. ENG 3020 (may be taken concurrently). A student may register for this course more than once for different topics.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 3570 - Women and Literature

    Goals: To understand women writers’ representations in literature by closely examining their work in historical and cultural contexts through the theory and practice of feminist criticism.

    Content: Focus varies. Recent examples: writers of color, wandering women, black women writers.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: ENG 3010 or WSTD 1010. A student may register for this class more than once for different topics.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 5600 - Composition Theory and Pedagogy

    Goals: To introduce students to the theory and practice of teaching writing.

    Content: Students will examine a range of composition philosophies and pedagogies. Through extensive reading and peer-reviewed demonstrations, students will learn and practice a process-based approach to teaching critical thinking, reading, and writing skills in the writing classroom.  Students will learn strategies for designing courses and assignments, facilitating discussions and peer reviews, integrating technology and research methods, and responding to writing through tutorials and written evaluations. Readings and presentations by practitioners will also introduce students to the philosophies and practices of Writing Across the Curriculum, the Writing Center, and second-language and basic writing instruction.

    This course is recommended for seniors who are contemplating applying to English graduate programs or contemplating teaching English at the secondary level. This course does not replace ENG 5700 Teaching English in the Middle and High Schools (5-12) or any other Education or licensure requirements.

    Taught: Fall

    Prerequisites: ENG 3010 and ENG 3020. Approval of advisor and signature of instructor required for registration.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 5700 - Teaching English in the Middle and High Schools (5-12)

    Goals: To instruct prospective teachers in the theoretical foundations of current teaching methods and practices.

    Content: Methods of teaching reading and composition. Planning the English curriculum within the community setting. The inclusion of adolescent literature, non-Western literature, and popular culture in the curriculum.

    Taught: Available annually at either Hamline or another ACTC school.

    Prerequisites: EDU 3150 and 3250; an English major or minor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ENG 5960 - Senior Seminar

    Goals: This course provides the capstone experience in the major. The goal of this course is to practice and polish previously learned skills and experiences to produce an analysis of literary texts of article length and quality. This essay marks the student’s entrance into the profession as a participant in an on-going and dynamic conversation about specific works and the discipline as a whole.

    Content: Varies from year to year. Recent examples: Twice-Told Tales; Salman Rushdie and Transnationalism; There is No Place Like Home: Literature of Exile; Slavery, Women and the Literary Imagination; Narratives of National Trauma; Propaganda and the Literature of Commitment; 20th Century Drama; Hard-Boiled Fiction; Hawthorne and “a Mob of Scribbling Women”; Renaissance Self-Fashioning; American Melancholy: Readings of Race, Sexuality and Performance Culture.

    Taught: Three senior seminars are offered each year.

    Prerequisites: ENG 3020 and at least one 3000-level literature course or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

  • News
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      Senior Jenna Potter, an English major and German and communications double minor at Hamline, was awarded the prestigious Fulbright Scholarship to teach in Hamburg, Germany. Senior Libby Otto named as alternate to Norway.
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