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    Department of Criminal Justice and Forensic Science
    MS-B1805
    Hamline University
    1536 Hewitt Avenue
    Saint Paul, MN 55104

    651-523-2295

    Shelly Schaefer
    Department Chair
    651-523-2145
    sschaefer02@hamline.edu



  • Students in Anthropology Lab

    Criminal Justice and Forensic Science Courses

    CJFS 1120 - CRIME AND JUSTICE IN AMERICA

    Goals: To introduce students to the basic framework of the American criminal justice system.

    Content: This course provides a broad overview of the American criminal justice system. The course examines criminal justice decision-making, police, criminal law, courts, prisons, and the juvenile justice system. This course is designed to introduce students to these broad topical areas and to explore the issues of equality and treatment, and the efficacy of criminal justice policy within the contemporary American criminal justice system.

    Taught: Annually, fall and spring.

    Prerequisite: None.

    Credits: 4 credits

    CJFS 1130 - LAB: THE BASICS OF FORENSIC SCIENCE

    This lab must be taken concurrently with the CJFS 1130 lecture.

    The lab itself has zero credit value.

    CJFS 1130 - THE BASICS OF FORENSIC SCIENCE

    Goals: To introduce non-science students to the practice of forensic science. Content: The nature of physical evidence and its role in the legal system; expert testimony; disciplines such as crime scene investigation, fingerprints, questioned documents, firearms, DNA, drugs, toxicology, fire debris, and trace microanalysis (hairs, glass, fibers).

    Taught: Fall and spring.

    Corequisite: CJFS 1130 - LAB: Basics of Forensic Science

    You may not take CJFS 1130 if you have already completed CJFS 3400: Survey of Forensic Science.

    Credits: 4 credits

    CJFS 1140-Introduction to Criminal Justice and Forensic Science Methods

    Goals: The objective of this course is to introduce 1) the logic and methods of criminal justice research, 2) the nature of criminal justice data and its interpretation, and 3) the statistical knowledge and tools for data analysis. Students will gain a basic statistical literacy.

    Content: This course will cover reading and understanding data on crime, sources of crime data, variable measurement, and descriptive and inferential statistics, including understanding samples, bivariate techniques, and an introduction to multivariate analyses.

    Taught: Annually, fall and spring.

    Prerequisite: CJFS 1120 Crime and Justice in America

    Credits: 4 credits

    CJFS 3400 - LAB: SURVEY OF FORENSIC SCIENCE

    This lab must be taken concurrently with the CJFS 3400 lecture.

    The lab itself has zero credit value.

    CJFS 3400 - SURVEY OF FORENSIC SCIENCE

    Goals: To develop knowledge of how ordinary, everyday objects become evidence and how that evidence is collected, analyzed, and interpreted; to gain experience in examining evidence, to practice providing written and oral reports on laboratory activities, and to develop skills in expert testimony.

    Content: Roles and responsibilities of forensic scientists; the nature of physical evidence; evidence collection, analysis and interpretation; admissibility of scientific evidence; the scope, potential, and limitations of forensic science; the ethical responsibilities of forensic scientists; and oral and written communication through a mock trial and report writing.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: BIOL 3050, or CHEM 1100 or 1130.

    Corequisite: CJFS 3400 - LAB: Survey of Forensic Science

    Credits: 4 credits

    CJFS 3410 - CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION AND RECONSTRUCTION

    Goals: To develop skills in the investigation of crime scenes; to recognize evidence; and to understand the role of physical evidence in the legal system.

    Content: The role of crime scene investigation in the legal system; properties of evidence; evidence collection procedures; admissibility of evidence; and interpreting and reporting results.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: CJFS 3400

    Credits: 2 credits

    CJFS 3420 - FORENSIC BIOLOGY

    Goals: To develop skills in the analysis of biological evidence; and to understand the role of science in the legal system.

    Content: Properties of biological evidence; evidence collection procedures; analysis and interpretation of evidence; reporting analysis results; and admissibility of evidence and expert testimony.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: CJFS 3400 and BIOL 3060

    Credits: 2 credits

    CJFS 3430 - FORENSIC DOCUMENT EXAMINATION

    Goals: To develop skills in the examination of questioned documents; and to understand the role of science in the legal system.

    Content: Properties of document evidence; evidence collection procedures; analysis and interpretation of evidence; reporting analysis results; and admissibility of evidence and expert testimony.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: CJFS 3400

    Credits: 2 credits

    CJFS 3440 - FORENSIC FINGERPRINT EXAMINATION

    Goals: To develop skills in the examination of fingerprints; and to understand the role of science in the legal system.

    Content: Properties of fingerprint evidence; evidence collection procedures; analysis and interpretation of evidence; reporting analysis results; and admissibility of evidence and expert testimony.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: CJFS 3400

    Credits: 2 credits

    CJFS 3450 - FORENSIC FIREARM AND TOOLMARK EXAMINATION

    Goals: To develop skills in the examination of firearms and toolmarks; and to understand the role of science in the legal system.

    Content: Properties of firearm and toolmark evidence; evidence collection procedures; analysis and interpretation of evidence; reporting analysis results; and admissibility of evidence and expert testimony.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: CJFS 3400

    Credits: 4 credits

    CJFS 3580 - FORENSIC SCIENCE INTERNSHIP

    Goals: To enable students to pursue internships and explore the connections between forensic science knowledge and experience in forensic science or related agencies; and to integrate internship experiences with their academic coursework.

    Content: Designing and completing an independent research project at a crime lab or medical examiner office; maintaining a reflective journal and discussing the internship experience; delivering a presentation about the research findings.

    Prerequisite: CJFS 3400

    Note 1: Forensic science students majoring in criminal justice may take CJFS 5660 to complete this requirement.

    Note 2: Students should contact the instructor well in advance of the beginning of the semester to discuss their internship placement site to assure prompt commencement of the internship.

    Note 3: Students interested in pursuing a laboratory internship must have, at the time of registration, no less than a 2.7 GPA in the natural science courses and a cumulative GPA of no less than 3.0.

    Credits: 2 credits

    CJFS 3590 - CURRENT ISSUES IN FORENSIC SCIENCE

    Goals: To explore and discuss issues that impact forensic scientists, affect the practice of forensic science, and ; the admissibility of scientific evidence and expert testimony in a court of law.

    Content: Challenges to the scientific basis and reliability of forensic science disciplines; key legal rulings on the admissibility of scientific evidence and expert testimony; scientific working groups and standards of practice; laboratory accreditation; professional certification; and the ethical practices and responsibilities of forensic scientists.

    Prerequisite: CJFS 3400

    Credits: 4 credits

    CJFS 3600 - FORENSIC CHEMICAL MICROSCOPY

    Goals: To develop knowledge of the principles and methods of handling, analyzing, and interpreting physical evidence.

    Content: Forensic microscopy: using stereo, brightfield, and polarized light microscopy to examine and compare hairs, fibers, glass, drugs and other evidence using refractive index, birefringence, microcrystal morphology and other techniques. Forensic chemistry: the principles of and methods for the analysis of drugs, fire debris, inks and paints, glass, paper, fibers, polymers, and other evidence. Forensic toxicology: pharmacology and interpretation of drugs in human specimens. Ethics in the forensic sciences: quality in the forensic science laboratory; the responsibilities of forensic scientists; and expert testimony.

    Taught: Annually, spring.

    Prerequisites: CHEM 3460 and CJFS 3400

    Corequisite: CJFS 3600 - LAB: Forensic Chemical Microscopy

    Credits: 4 credits

    CJFS 3600 - LAB: FORENSIC CHEMICAL MICROSCOPY

    This lab must be taken concurrently with the CJFS 3600 lecture.

    The lab itself has zero credit value.

    CJFS 3700: Policing in America

    Goals: The objectives for this course are for students to understand police organizations/operations from a social science perspective.

    Content: The course covers topics related to police conduct, community policing, police subculture, professionalization of the police, ethical decision making in law enforcement and evidence-based policing.

    Prerequisite: LGST 1110 or CJFS 1120, or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    CJFS 3750 Criminology

    Goal: The objectives for this course are for students to understand the causes of crime and why individuals commit crimes.

    Content: The focus of this course are theories of crime and of criminal behavior and the contexts (individual and societal characteristics, family, and neighborhood) associated with crime and offending.

    Taught: Annually, fall and spring.

    Prerequisite: CJFS 1120; or SOC 1110; or PSY 1330; or LGST 1110. For criminal justice majors, it is strongly recommended that you complete CJFS 1140 prior to enrolling in this class.

    Credits: 4 credits

    CJFS 3760: Juvenile Delinquency/Juvenile Justice

    Goals: To acquaint the student with the history and inception of the juvenile court; the evolution of adolescence; understand, evaluate and apply theories of delinquency; and describe the organization of the juvenile justice system and intervention strategies.

    Content: The objectives for this course are for students to understand the historical development of the concept of delinquency, theories related to delinquent behavior, and how theories influence the development of juvenile justice policy. The course will also cover the structure and operations of the juvenile justice system, examining both recent legal reforms and juvenile correctional strategies.

    Taught: Annually, fall and spring.

    Prerequisites: CJFS 1120; SOC 1110; PSY 1330, or LGST 1110. It is strongly recommended that students majoring in criminal justice also complete CJFS 1140 prior to enrolling in the course.

    Credits: 4 credits

    CJFS 3770-Punishment, Corrections and Society

    Goals: The objectives of this course are to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the issues and methods of punishment and social control within American correctional practice and to review the empirical research assessing the effectiveness of correctional practice.

    Content: This course examines theories of punishment and asks questions such as “Why do we punish and how much? Is punishment a deterrent for future criminal offending behavior? What are current correctional, sentencing, and punishment techniques being used in the United States? The course will also cover theories of punishment, the structure and operations of the U.S jail, prison, and correction systems, and explore current correctional policies and their impact on individuals and society.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: CJFS 1120; or SOC 1110; or PSY 1330; SOCJ 1100 or LGST 1110. It is strongly recommended that students majoring in criminal justice also complete CJFS 1140 prior to enrolling in the course.

    LGST 3810/ CJFS: Criminal Law and Practice

    Goals: To acquaint the student with the theory and practice of substantive criminal law.

    Content: A study of the substantive aspects of criminal law, including traditional elements of crimes, statutory definitions, and judicial interpretations of specific crimes and motor vehicle offenses, as well as inchoate crimes, defenses to legal liability, and sentencing procedure.

    Taught: Annually, fall.

    Prerequisite: LGST 1110 or CJFS 1120, or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 4

    LGST/CJFS 3820: Constitutional Issues in Criminal Procedure

    Goal: To acquaint the student with the theory and practice of criminal procedural law.

    Content: An overview and critical examination of the procedural aspects of criminal law and issues relating to constitutional protections against unreasonable searches and seizures, unlawful gathering of incriminating evidence through interrogation and identification procedures, and the provision of legal counsel in criminal matters.

    Taught: Annually, spring.

    Prerequisites: LGST 1110 or CJFS 1120, or permission of the instructor.

    CJFS 5660 - CAPSTONE AND INTERNSHIP IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

    Goals: To enable students to pursue internships and explore the connections between criminal justice knowledge and skills and experiences in professional workplace settings.

    Content: An exploration of applied criminal justice and the application of criminal justice concepts to professional workplace practice; independent research projects and frequent on-campus seminars are designed to connect academic and workplace experiences.

    Taught: Fall and spring.

    Prerequisites: CJFS 3750, LGST 3810, LGST 3820, or co-registration in LGST 3810 or LGST 3820; or permission of the instructor.

    Students should contact the instructor well in advance of the beginning of the semester to discuss their internship placement site to assure prompt commencement of the internship.

    Credits: 4 credits

    CJFS 5980- Special Topics in Criminal Justice

    Goal: The goals of this course are to critically exam current and relevant issues related to criminal justice policy, the correctional system, and legal issues through a criminological lens.

    Content: The content of the course focuses on current issues in the criminal justice system.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: CJFS 1120; CJFS 1140; CJFS 3750; and either CJFS 3770 or CJFS 3760. Non-criminal justice majors by permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

  • News
    • The Hamline to Hamline Collaboration is offering grants for collaborative programming or events that enrich the collaboration between Hamline Elementary and Hamline University with applications due by Monday, May 12.
    • Senior Jenna Potter, an English major and German and communications double minor at Hamline, was awarded the prestigious Fulbright Scholarship to teach in Hamburg, Germany. Senior Libby Otto named as alternate to Norway.
    • Hear about the eye-opening experiences of Hamline students who participated in this year’s Catalyst spring break service trips.
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