• Collaborative Research: National Conference of Undergraduate Research

    Collaborative Research: National Conference
    of Undergraduate Research

    Each year, over 2,000 undergraduate students competitively chosen from colleges and universities nation-wide present their original research at the National Conference of Undergraduate Research (NCUR). Traditionally, Hamline University has been able to provide about forty grants (covering travel expenses, accommodations, and registration) for undergraduates presenting research they have conducted for advanced classes, independent studies, honors theses, and/or summer collaborative research.

    The Hamline student contingent, which brings together scholars from the entire spectrum of academic disciplines and programs, is one of the largest in the nation. Of the 300+ colleges and universities that send delegations, Hamline consistently places in the top 5 in terms of students sponsored, and the 92% acceptance rate places the selected students respectably above the 82-84 nation-wide rate.

    Students selected to present at NCUR, together with the accompanying faculty members, foster a collaborative community committed to a challenging and nurturing intellectual environment. While away at the conference, students live in close quarters that provide a unique opportunity to foster interdisciplinary scholarly connections. Delegates typically attend each other's presentations to provide formative feedback on both research content and form of delivery. Each presenter further receives feedback from at least one faculty member.

     


    2014 NCUR Application Process - NCUR 28

    The 28th National Conference of Undergraduate Research (NCUR) will be hosted by the University of Kentucky (in Lexington) between April 3 and 5, 2014. The Collaborative Research Program will provide conference travel funds for roughly forty undergraduates to present results of their academic work at Hamline. Students in all divisions, majors, and programs who have conducted original research in their courses, independent studies, honors theses, creative projects, or collaborative research are encouraged to apply. Submission of an application indicates a serious commitment to attend the full conference and travel with the Hamline delegation, which will likely leave St. Paul Wednesday, April 2 and return Sunday, April 6. Students who would like to attend the conference but not travel with the group are not eligible for funding from the Collaborative Research Program (although you can still apply to NCUR).

    INTERNAL SELECTION PROCESS

    To apply for NCUR 2014 funding, all interested students must first submit their abstract (prepared with view to NCUR-specific abstract guidelines) to a Hamline University-wide selection committee that will make recommendations for Hamline NCUR representatives. To be considered, email your abstract to ncur@hamline.edu by 11:59 pm on November 1, 2013. Please send your abstract as an email attachment in either Word or PDF format, and use your official Hamline email account.

    Because the Collaborative Research Program plans carefully to maximize its budget in an attempt to accommodate such a large number of students, the program cannot fund students who skip the internal selection process and apply directly to NCUR.

    Your submission should be in the following format (for more information and tips on preparing your abstract, read over NCUR application instructions from last year.

    Abstract Title:

    Of Squirrels and Men: A story of Platelet Storage

    Name of Author(s), Institution and Institutional Address: 

    Bailee Sliker (Scott Cooper) Biology Department, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse,

    La Crosse, WI 54601

    Abstract:

    Platelets are routinely used in transfusions, yet they cannot be stored in a refrigerator or else they will be cleared rapidly when re-injected into a patient. The objective of this experiment is to see if platelets from ground squirrels are resistant to cold storage, and thus could serve as a model to develop methods to store human platelets in the cold. To test this we will fluorescently label platelets from humans and ground squirrels, store them at 4°C and 37°C for up to 48 hours, and measure their uptake by cultured human liver cells. Previous research has shown that human platelets stored at 4°C are rapidly taken up, and we predict that ground squirrel platelets stored at 4°C will be resistant to this cold storage. 

    NATIONAL SELECTION PROCESS

    Students selected in the internal selection process will be invited to submit their abstracts to the national level via the NCUR 2014 website by December 6, 2013. Submitted abstracts will be evaluated by discipline-specific panels of experts who will select conference presenters. The results of that selection process are to be announced mid-January per the NCUR 28 timeline.