• Chemistry

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    Department of Chemistry
    MS-B1807
    Hamline University
    1536 Hewitt Avenue
    Saint Paul, MN 55104

    651-523-2291

    Rita Majerle
    Department Chair
    651-523-2765
    rmajerle01@hamline.edu

  • Hamline University's Bishop Leonidas statue

    Chemistry Courses at Hamline University

    CHEM 1100 - Chemistry and Society

    Goals: To introduce and develop some basic principles of chemistry and demonstrate how they affect humankind and the environment.

    Content: Basic principles of chemistry are introduced using a case study method. Topics include the ozone layer, global warming, acid rain, nuclear fission and fusion, nutrition, water as a natural resource, fossil and solar energy, and others. Special attention is paid to the social, economic and political contexts in which society deals with these issues. Models of chemical structure and bonding are developed as well as the basic concepts of thermodynamics, kinetics, and acid-base relationships.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: None. High school chemistry is not required.

    Note: You may not take CHEM 1100 if you have already completed CHEM 1130: General Chemistry I.

    Credits: 4 credits

    CHEM 1100 - LAB: Chemistry and Society

    This lab must be taken concurrently with the CHEM 1100 lecture.

    The lab itself has zero credit value.

    CHEM 1130 - General Chemistry I

    Goals: To introduce and develop the fundamental principles of analytical, biological, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. To provide instruction in fundamental laboratory techniques and to encourage the development of interpretive and problem-solving skills.

    Content: Scientific measurement, stoichiometry, energy changes, physical behavior of gases, electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, bonding models including valence bond, molecular orbital and hybridization, molecular geometry, intermolecular forces, properties of solutions, liquids and solids, nomenclature, and chemistry of familiar elements. Gravimetric, volumetric and calorimetric measurements; graphical data analysis. Application of modern spectroscopic techniques to structure determination.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: Higher algebra. High school chemistry is highly recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    CHEM 1130 - LAB: General Chemistry I

    This lab must be taken concurrently with the CHEM 1130 lecture.

    The lab itself has zero credit value.

    CHEM 1140 - General Chemistry II

    Goals: To further develop the fundamental principles of analytical, biological, inorganic, physical and organic chemistry. Emphasis on the development of problem-solving techniques. The laboratory focuses on inorganic qualitative analysis.

    Content: Spontaneity and rates of chemical reactions; equilibrium involving gases, acids, bases and salts; acid-base theories; titration theory and practice, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, biochemistry, the chemical and physical properties of metals, nonmetals, and coordination compounds.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1130.

    Credits: 4 credits

    CHEM 1140 - LAB: General Chemistry II

    This lab must be taken concurrently with the CHEM 1140 lecture.

    The lab itself has zero credit value.

    CHEM 3240 - Analytical Chemistry

    Goals: To introduce and develop the theoretical concepts and laboratory practices of quantitative chemical analysis.

    Content: Theory and practice in classical analytical methods and instrumentation; emphasis on ionic equilibria and electrochemistry and their relevance to chemical analysis; application of computers and statistics to analytical problems.

    Taught: Annually, spring.

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1140 (grade of C- or better).

    Credits: 4 credits

    CHEM 3240 - LAB: Analytical Chemistry

    This lab must be taken concurrently with the CHEM 3240 lecture.

    The lab itself has zero credit value.

    CHEM 3330 - Instrumental Methods

    Goals: To develop in depth the theory, scope, and limitations of the most commonly applied instrumental techniques of chemical analysis.

    Content: Theory and techniques of infrared, ultraviolet, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, potentiometry, and other spectral and electrical methods of analysis, emphasizing relations among such factors as noise, resolution, sensitivity, error, and economics; applications of computers to analytical systems.

    Taught: Annually, fall.

    Prerequisites: CHEM 3240 (grade of C- or better), CHEM 3460, and co-registration with CHEM 3940. MATH 1180 and PHYS 1240 recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    CHEM 3450 - LAB: Organic Chemistry I

    This lab must be taken concurrently with the CHEM 3450 lecture.

    The lab itself has zero credit value.

    CHEM 3450 - Organic Chemistry I

    Goals: To develop a broad understanding of the theoretical concepts of organic chemistry. Molecular orbital theory and valence bond resonance theory are invoked to describe and explain the ramifications of covalent bonding in organic molecules. Thermodynamic considerations of 3-dimensional molecular shape are discussed. Instrumental techniques for the assignment of molecular structure are a key focus. Modern mechanistic theory of organic chemical reactions is developed in detail.

    Content: Nomenclature, model building, stereochemistry, mass, ultraviolet, infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mechanisms associated with acid-base reactions, nucleophilic substitution, and nucleophilic addition.

    Taught: Annually, fall.

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1140 (C- grade or better) or with instructor's permission.

    Credits: 4 credits

    CHEM 3460 - LAB: Organic Chemistry II

    This lab must be taken concurrently with the CHEM 3460 lecture.

    The lab itself has zero credit value.

    CHEM 3460 - Organic Chemistry II

    Goals: To further develop the theoretical concepts of organic chemistry and develop plausible synthetic and mechanistic pathways.

    Content: Mechanisms associated with elimination, electrophilic substitution, electrophilic addition, free radical reactions, and pericyclic reactions. Chemistries of alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, pericyclic compounds, polymers, proteins and carbohydrates including reactions of intermediary metabolism.

    Taught: Annually, spring.

    Prerequisite: CHEM 3450 (C- or better).

    Credits: 4 credits

    CHEM 3550 - Physical Chemistry I

    Goals: To introduce and develop fundamental concepts of thermodynamics and quantum mechanics and to further develop problem-solving techniques using advanced mathematical tools.

    Content: The thermodynamics section introduces students to the study of the properties of gases, partition functions, a statistical foundation of thermodynamics, and the three laws of thermodynamics. The quantum mechanics section introduces the wave equation, probability, particle-in-a-box, basic rigid rotator and harmonic oscillator models for spectroscopy, and the hydrogen atom.

    Taught: Annually, fall.

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1140 (C- grade or better), MATH 1180, and PHYS 1240 or co-registration

    Credits: 4 credits

    CHEM 3560 - Physical chemistry ii

    Goals: To further develop concepts in thermodynamics and chemical kinetics and concepts of quantum mechanics and demonstrate applicability to real systems.

    Content: This course continues using the material that was learned in part I to extend our understanding of thermodynamics to phase equilibria, chemical equilibria, theory of solutions and chemical kinetics. Time permitting we will look at extensions to non-equilibrium systems. Quantum mechanics continues with the introduction of the multielectron atomic system, then molecules and bonding, and applications in spectroscopy.

    Taught: Annually, spring.

    Prerequisites: CHEM 3550 (C- grade of better).

    Credits: 4 credits

    CHEM 3820 - Biochemistry I

    Crosslisted
    Listed under Biochemistry as BIOC 3820.

    CHEM 3830 - Biochemistry II

    Crosslisted
    Listed under Biochemistry as BIOC 3830.

    CHEM 3940 - Advanced Laboratory Techniques

    Goals: To provide instruction in some practical skills commonly used by professional chemists.

    Content: Experimental design, laboratory manipulations, data analysis, searching the scientific literature, preparation and presentation of oral and written reports. Work in the fall term is coordinated with CHEM 3330 and emphasizes student-driven small group research projects along with instrument design, capabilities, and limitations. Work in the spring term emphasizes application of instrumental methods to the study of physical chemistry.

    Taught: Annually, fall term.

    Prerequisites: CHEM 3240, CHEM 3460, co-registration with CHEM 3330.

    Credits: 2 credits

    Chem 3950 - Physical chemistry laboratory techniques

    Goals: To provide instruction in some practical skills commonly used by chemists and engineers with an emphasis on techniques used in physical chemistry.

    Content: Experimental design, laboratory manipulations, data analysis, searching the scientific literature, preparation and presentation of written lab notebooks, reports and journal articles. Work in the spring term is coordinated with the Physical Chemistry course 3560. This is a writing intensive course. The course laboratories investigate thermodynamic/quantum principles and properties using calorimetry, spectroscopy, conductivity, and computational techniques.

    Taught: Annually, spring term.

    Prerequisites: CHEM 3550, co-registration with CHEM 3560.

    Credits: 2 credits

    CHEM 5820 - Advanced Analytical Chemistry

    Goals: To further develop techniques for efficiently dealing with analytical problems relevant to chemical research and production.

    Content: The analysis of real materials with attention to the literature of analytical chemistry and to the theoretical aspects of such topics as separation techniques and instrumental methods. Emphasis on the relationship between analytical problems and methods to solve them.

    Taught: By request.

    Prerequisites: CHEM 3330 and CHEM 540 (or co-registration).

    Credits: 4 credits

    CHEM 5840 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

    Goals: To introduce and develop classical and modern concepts of inorganic chemistry.

    Content: Periodic, chemical, and physical properties of the elements; symmetry and group theory; ionic and covalent bonding; acid-base chemistry; kinetics and mechanisms; metals and semiconductors; electronic spectra of coordination complexes; organometallic and bioinorganic chemistry; the application of molecular orbital theory; and quantum mechanical calculations.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisites: CHEM 1140 (grade C- or better).

    Credits: 4 credits

    CHEM 5840 - LAB: Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

    This lab must be taken concurrently with the CHEM 5840 lecture.

    The lab itself has zero credit value.

    CHEM 5860 - Advanced Organic Chemistry

    Goals: To further develop skills in modern mechanistic theory, organophysical chemistry, and retrosynthetic analysis. Particular emphasis is placed on stereocontrol in synthetic applications.

    Content: Problem solving discussion sessions; individual and group problem sets; critical analysis of research seminars and research papers.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisites: CHEM 3460 and CHEM 3550 (C- grade or better), or by permission of instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    CHEM 5880 - Advanced Physical Chemistry

    Goals: To provide an advanced treatment of special topics in physical chemistry.

    Content: Topics from statistical thermodynamics, molecular spectroscopy, magnetic resonance, theoretical organic, kinetics, molecular mechanics, and polymer chemistry may be included.

    Taught: By request.

    Prerequisite: CHEM 3560.

    Credits: 4 credits

    CHEM 5960 - Research Techniques I

    Goals: To provide an opportunity to further develop research techniques and skills in the field of chemistry.

    Content: An individual, original student research project in some field of chemistry, including reviewing the pertinent chemical literature, designing and carrying out laboratory experiments, writing an extensive paper, and presenting a formal seminar.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: CHEM 5840 (or co-registration) or faculty consent.

    Credits: 2 credits fall term, 2 credits spring term

    CHEM 5961 - Research Techniques II

    Goals: To provide an opportunity to further develop research techniques and skills in the field of chemistry.

    Content: An individual, original student research project in some field of chemistry, including reviewing the pertinent chemical literature, designing and carrying out laboratory experiments, writing an extensive paper, and presenting a formal seminar.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: CHEM 5960.

    Credits: 2 credits fall term, 2 credits spring term