• Art History

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    Department of Studio Arts & Art History
    MS-B1801
    Hamline University
    1536 Hewitt Avenue
    Saint Paul, MN 55104

    P: 651-523-2457
    F: 651-523-3066 

    Aida Audeh
    Department Chair
    651-523-2457
    aaudeh@hamline.edu



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    Art History Courses at Hamline University

    ARTH 1200 - Western Traditions: Prehistory to the Middle Ages

    Goals: To explore the arts from prehistoric times through the Middle Ages, and to promote an understanding that a work of art is a reflection of the culture in which it was created. To gain an understanding of formal principles and the materials and techniques of artistic production.

    Content: The traditions of painting, sculpture, architecture, and the decorative arts in the western world from roughly 20,000 BC to the fourteenth century. Some comparison to non-western works is presented. Major monuments are considered in light of religious, political, social, economic, and geographic conditions. Special emphasis is placed on the iconography and cultural context of the works, along with the methods and materials of artistic production. This course is strongly advised as a foundation for ARTH 1210.

    Taught: Annually, Fall Term.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 1210 - Western Traditions: Renaissance to Contemporary

    Goals: To introduce the major monuments of art history from the fourteenth century through the Pop Art of the 1960s, and to promote an understanding that a work of art is a reflection of the culture in which it was created. To gain an understanding of formal principles and the materials and techniques of artistic production.

    Content: The traditions of painting, sculpture, architecture, and the graphic and decorative arts in the western world from the fourteenth century through contemporary times. Major monuments are considered in light of religious, political, social, economic,and geographic conditions. Special emphasis is placed on the iconography and cultural context of the works, along with the methods and materials of artistic production.

    Prerequisite: While it is not required, students are strongly advised to take ARTH 1200 before taking ARTH 1210.

    Taught: Annually, Spring Term.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 1300 - Dante and the Visual Arts

    Goals: To familiarize students with one of the great works of Western culture, Dante’s Divine Comedy, and, of that work, to read its most well-known component, the Inferno. To explore the interaction of art and literature through study of artists’ interpretations of the Inferno from the Middle Ages through the 20th century. Arts studied include painting, sculpture, and book/manuscript illustration.

    Content: Students will read all of Dante’s Inferno (which is the first of three parts of the Divine Comedy, the other two being Purgatorio and Paradiso) and will study visual imagery created as illustration of this work or as inspired by this work.

    Taught: Alternate years, concurrently with ARTH 3300.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 1310 - High Renaissance Art in Italy

    Goals: To explore the art and culture of the High Renaissance in Italy through in-depth study of four major artists of the period: Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, and Titian.

    Content: This course focuses on the lives and works of Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, and Titian within the cultural context of the High Renaissance in Italy. The course will address issues of biography, patronage, and art theory.

    Taught: Alternate years, concurrently with ARTH 3310.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 1600 - American Art, 1800-1945

    Goals: Art and other visual images have reflected and helped shape the way Americans think about their country and each other. This in-depth survey course examines a critical period (roughly 1800-1945) in American art and history during which the frontier closed, fortunes were made, the national identity shifted, and the Puritan suspicion of art gave way.

    Content: With a focus on the development of American art forms and the American modern artist, we will consider the relationship between visual images and power in a time of growing power and diversity for both the nation and art. Primary source readings will augment the text and visuals, and case studies will highlight important issues in American art and society at the time, and in recent scholarship.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 1610 - The History and Politics of Landscape in Art

    Goals: The land has historically been critical to the forming of national and individual identities. Through its representation in art and visual culture, it has been put to the service of politics, economics, class, and gender, as well as personal expression and the quest for beauty.

    Content: This course examines the representation of landscape from its beginnings as “background” in 15th century Renaissance images, to a powerful independent genre in the 19th century, a “dematerialized image” in the late 20th, and a newly popular art form today that meets multiple needs. We will examine images along with primary source readings and, on occasion, a visit by a contemporary landscape artist.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 1700 - Women and Art

    Goals: This interdisciplinary course focuses specifically on women, in their roles as makers of art and patrons of art as well as subjects of art. Geographically, the course will deal with American and European culture; chronologically, we will examine women’s artistic activity from antiquity to the present, with a concentration on the last 200+ years. The concepts of patriarchy and ideology as they influence art production in a given society will background investigations of women’s own activities as creators and patrons of art. We will examine works of art and architecture and visual culture images, along with complementary literary and theoretical writings from primary and secondary sources.

    Content: Students will become familiar with the ways in which the writing of art history, the evolution of art professionalism, and the criteria for the evaluation of art have subjugated women and—alternately—how women have manipulated these developments to gain agency. As an example, we will explore traditional categories of feminine portrayal and archetypes like the “crone”, the “fatal woman”, and “vanitas” as they morph through time and social change to see how women artists have used or challenged these models in their quest to gain institutional and personal artistic freedom and power. The subject is always examined in the larger context of the society in which art is produced.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 1710 - Visual Constructions of Gender

    Goals: This interdisciplinary themed course focuses on visual images of gender in modern and contemporary western culture. From the “Fallen Woman” to the “Queer Eye”, our understanding of masculinity(ies) and femininity(ies) has been determined in part by the visual images we encounter in the media and the art world; these images reflect societal imperatives and anxieties regarding sex and gender relations, and simultaneously help to construct our ideas about them.

    Content: Explores such questions as: To what degree are these images artificially constructed and to what purposes? How do such constructions cross national/international borders? How do they relate to verbal and literary constructions of the period? Also explores literary and theoretical writings, and images from both art and the media.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 1720 - Art and Identity

    Goals: The topic of the course is how Art has been used historically and is used today to construct identity. The course relies on the theories of nationalism, community, and cultural artifact put forth by Gellner, Anderson, Hobsbawm and others.

    Content: Each of four specific topic areas examined in this course (identity at personal, communal, national, and cultural levels) will involve class lecture on art historical aspects and guest speakers from Hamline and from the larger Twin Cities community. Each topic will also involve a community service project. Students will be assigned into groups (4-5 students in each of 4 groups). Each group will address one of the topic areas and each student within that group will perform at least 20 hours of community service in that topic area (project at a specific location will be arranged by Instructor with a particular organization). At the end of the semester each group will give an in-class presentation of its community service work in the context of the class topic and material.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 1800 - History of Photography

    Goals: This introductory course will examine the technological, cultural, scientific and artistic aspects of photography from its inception in the early 19th century into the current digital era.

    Content: We will study the various photographic technologies and techniques that preceded the modern-day photograph, and how those processes impacted who took pictures and what types of pictures they made. We will investigate the various purposes photographs have served throughout history, such as recording current events and places near and far; investigating society and the human body; depicting movement; and providing evidence. We will explore artistic movements in photography and the use of photography in contemporary art. We will also consider photographers’ efforts to challenge visual perception and photography’s purported link to the external visible world. The course will include a significant gender component; we will study the rise of women photographers at the turn of the 20th century, the representation of women, and the use of photography in feminist contemporary art.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 1810 - The City in Film, Photography, and Visual Media

    Goals: The rise of the city as a cultural force after the Industrial Revolution coincided with the development of film and photography. So it is not surprising that filmmakers and photographers have eagerly engaged the city as a subject and setting, from city planning films to major motion pictures, from lyrical narratives to sci fi dystopias, from social reform documentary to the avant garde.

    Content: In this course, we will analyze the meanings and contexts of city images in terms of narrative, space and social space. We will explore how images of the city represent issues of modernity, sexuality, the individual and community and also connect them to historical changes in actual cities and ideas about the city. The course will end with case studies of contemporary films that address issues of global cities, including Shanghai, Hong Kong and Mexico City.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 3300 - Dante and the Visual Arts

    Goals: To familiarize students with one of the great works of Western culture, Dante’s Divine Comedy, and, of that work, to read its most well-known component, the Inferno. To explore the interaction of art and literature through study of artists’ interpretations of the Inferno from the Middle Ages through the 20th century. Arts studied include painting, sculpture, and book/manuscript illustration.

    Content: Students will read all of Dante’s Inferno (which is the first of three parts of the Divine Comedy, the other two parts being Purgatorio and Paradiso) and will study visual imagery created as illustration of this work or as inspired by this work.

    Prerequisites: ARTH 1200 and ARTH 1210.

    Taught: Alternate years, concurrently with ARTH 1300.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 3310 - High Renaissance Art in Italy

    Goals: To explore the art and culture of the High Renaissance in Italy through in-depth study of four major artists of the period: Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, and Titian.

    Content: This course focuses on the lives and works of Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, and Titian within the cultural context of the High Renaissance in Italy. The course will address issues of biography, patronage, and art theory.

    Prerequisites: ARTH 1200 and ARTH 1210.

    Taught: Alternate years, concurrently with ARTH 1310.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 3600 - American Art, 1800-1945

    Goals: Art and other visual images have reflected and helped shape the way Americans think about their country and each other. This in-depth survey course examines a critical period (roughly 1800-1945) in American art and history during which the frontier closed, fortunes were made, the national identity shifted, and the Puritan suspicion of art gave way.

    Content: With a focus on the development of American art forms and the American modern artist, we will consider the relationship between visual images and power in a time of growing power and diversity for both the nation and art. Primary source readings will augment the text and visuals, and case studies will highlight important issues in American art and society at the time, and in recent scholarship.

    Prerequisites: ARTH 1200 and ARTH 1210.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 3610 - The History and Politics of Landscape in Art

    Goals: The land has historically been critical to the forming of national and individual identities. Through its representation in art and visual culture, it has been put to the service of politics, economics, class, and gender, as well as personal expression and the quest for beauty.

    Content: This course examines the representation of landscape from its beginnings as “background” in 15th century Renaissance images, to a powerful independent genre in the 19th century, a “dematerialized image” in the late 20th, and a newly popular art form today that meets multiple needs. We will examine images along with primary source readings and, on occasion, a visit by a contemporary landscape artist.

    Prerequisites: ARTH 1200 and ARTH 1210.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 3700 - Women and Art

    Goals: This interdisciplinary course focuses specifically on women, in their roles as makers of art and patrons of art as well as subjects of art. Geographically, the course will deal with American and European culture; chronologically, we will examine women’s artistic activity from antiquity to the present, with a concentration on the last 200+ years. The concepts of patriarchy and ideology as they influence art production in a given society with background investigations of women’s own activities as creators and patrons of art. We will examine works of art and architecture and visual culture images, along with complementary literary and theoretical writings from primary and secondary sources.

    Content: Students will become familiar with the ways in which the writing of art history, the evolution of art professionalism, and the criteria for the evaluation of art have subjugated women and—alternately—how women have manipulated these developments to gain agency. As an example, we will explore traditional categories of feminine portrayal and archetypes like the “crone”, the “fatal woman”, and “vanitas” as they morph through time and social change to see how women artists have used or challenged these models in their quest to gain institutional and personal artistic freedom and power. The subject is always examined in the larger context of the society in which art is produced.

    Prerequisites: ARTH 1200 and ARTH 1210.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 3710 - Visual Constructions of Gender

    Goals: This interdisciplinary themed course focuses on visual images of gender in modern and contemporary western culture. From the “Fallen Woman” to the “Queer Eye”, our understanding of masculinity(ies) and femininity(ies) has been determined in part by the visual images we encounter in the media and the art world; these images reflect societal imperatives and anxieties regarding sex and gender relations, and simultaneously help to construct our ideas about them.

    Content: Explores such questions as: To what degree are these images artificially constructed and to what purposes? How do such constructions cross national/international borders? How do they relate to verbal and literary constructions of the period? Also explores literary and theoretical writings, and images from both art and the media.

    Prerequisites: ARTH 1200 and ARTH 1210.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 3720 - Art and Identity

    Goals: The topic of the course is how Art has been used historically and is used today to construct identity. The course relies on the theories of nationalism, community, and cultural artifact put forth by Gellner, Anderson, Hobsbawm and others.

    Content: Each of four specific topic areas examined in this course (identity at personal, communal, national, and cultural levels) will involve class lecture on art historical aspects and guest speakers from Hamline and from the larger Twin Cities community. Each topic will also involve a community service project. Students will be assigned into groups (4-5 students in each of 4 groups). Each group will address one of the topic areas and each student within that group will perform at least 20 hours of community service in that topic area (project at a specific location will be arranged by Instructor with a particular organization). At the end of the semester each group will give an in-class presentation of its community service work in the context of the class topic and material. In addition, students at the 3000 level will write a research paper on an art historical topic related to the theme of the class.

    Prerequisites: ARTH 1200 and ARTH 1210.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 3800 - History of Photography

    Goals: This introductory course will examine the technological, cultural, scientific and artistic aspects of photography from its inception in the early 19th century into the current digital era.

    Content: We will study the various photographic technologies and techniques that preceded the modern-day photograph, and how those processes impacted who took pictures and what types of pictures they made. We will investigate the various purposes photographs have served throughout history, such as recording current events and places near and far; investigating society and the human body; depicting movement; and providing evidence. We will explore artistic movements in photography and the use of photography in contemporary art. We will also consider photographers’ efforts to challenge visual perception and photography’s purported link to the external visible world. The course will include a significant gender component; we will study the rise of women photographers at the turn of the 20th century, the representation of women, and the use of photography in feminist contemporary art.

    Prerequisites: ARTH 1200 and ARTH 1210.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 3810 - The City in Film, Photography, and Visual Media

    Goals: The rise of the city as a cultural force after the Industrial Revolution coincided with the development of film and photography. So it is not surprising that filmmakers and photographers have eagerly engaged the city as a subject and setting, from city planning films to major motion pictures, from lyrical narratives to sci fi dystopias, from social reform documentary to the avant garde.

    Content: In this course, we will analyze the meanings and contexts of city images in terms of narrative, space and social space. We will explore how images of the city represent issues of modernity, sexuality, the individual and community and also connect them to historical changes in actual cities and ideas about the city. The course will end with case studies of contemporary films that address issues of global cities, including Shanghai, Hong Kong and Mexico City.

    Prerequisites: ARTH 1200 and ARTH 1210.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits 

    ARTH 3900 - 19th-Century Art in Europe

    Goals: To explore major artists and artistic developments in Western Europe in the 19th century within their cultural, political, social, and esthetic contexts.

    Content: The emphasis of the course will be on painting, but significant developments in sculpture and architecture will be considered as well.  The course is strongly advised as a foundation for ARTH 3910.

    Prerequisites: ARTH 1200 and ARTH 1210.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 3910 - 20th-Century Art in Europe and the United States

    Goals: To explore the arts of the 20th century in Europe and the United States, and to examine individual artists and artworks in light of their respective artistic movements and cultural contexts. To analyze relationships between theory and image, as well as relationships between artistic periods.

    Content: Sculpture and painting of the 20th century in Europe and the United States. Special attention is given to major artistic movements, theoretical explorations, and the role of the avant-garde.

    Prerequisites: ARTH 1200 and ARTH 1210.  Students are strongly advised to take ARTH 3900 prior to taking ARTH 3910.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 5000 - Senior Art History Research

    Goals: To conduct independent research appropriate for the discipline of art history. To develop a senior research paper necessary for graduation.

    Content: Independent research concluding with a major paper on a topic appropriate for the discipline of art history. Each student shall work closely with the instructor in topic selection, research methodology, development, and evaluation of the paper.

    Prerequisites: ARTH 1200, ARTH 1210, and ARTH 3910.

    Taught: Annually, Fall Term; taught concurrently with ARTH 5450.

    Credits: 2 credits

    ARTH 5010 - Senior Art History Research Honors*

    Goals: To conduct independent research appropriate for the discipline of art history. To develop a senior research paper necessary for graduation.

    Content: Independent research concluding with a major paper on a topic appropriate for the discipline of art history. Each student shall work closely with the instructor in topic selection, research methodology, development, and evaluation of the paper. The Senior Art History Honors tutorial is considered a year-long project.

    Prerequisites: ARTH 1200, ARTH 1210, and ARTH 3910, or permission of instructor. In addition, the student must be a senior with a grade point average of 3.5 or higher in the Art History major and of 3.0 in cumulative coursework to qualify for graduation with Honors. The student must have written permission of the instructor to register for Senior Art History Research Honors.

    Typically, students register for this course in the fall term and complete it in the spring term of their senior year. Upon successful completion, the * in the course title will include the actual honors project title on the official transcript of the student.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ARTH 5450 - Senior Seminar: Methodologies of Art History

    Goals: This course acquaints students with various methodological approaches used within the field of art history. Through analyzing and applying these various methods, students practice critical reading and discussion skills, and exercise writing, research, and speaking skills necessary to execute an advanced research project in the field of art history.

    Content: Students will study various methodological approaches used in the field of art history and apply them to their own research project through completion of a written project as well as an oral presentation.

    Prerequisites: ARTH 1200, ARTH 1210, and ARTH 3910.
     
    Taught: Annually, fall semester; taught concurrently with ARTH 5000.

    Credits: 2 credits

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