• Anthropology

  • Questions? 

    Anthropology Department
    MS-B1805
    Hamline University
    1536 Hewitt Avenue
    Saint Paul, MN 55104

    651-523-2295
    dig@hamline.edu  

    Brian Hoffman
    Department Chair
    651-523-2891
    bhoffman@hamline.edu

  • Hamline Anthropology students examining bones

    Anthropology Courses at Hamline University

    ANTH 1100 - World Prehistory 

    Goals: To introduce students to the fascinating story of humanity’s deep history as told by archaeology. Students will also gain competency in the critical evaluation of scientific claims and archaeological knowledge.

    Content: Survey of over four million years of human prehistory from our earliest hominid ancestors to the rise of ancient states. Topics include the first stone tools and the emergence of human culture, Neanderthals, Upper Paleolithic art, the origins of agriculture, the building of monumental architecture, and culminating with the first states, including those of Mesopotamia, Egypt, China and Mexico. We will also consider how archaeologists study the past through laboratory exercises, field assignments, and a computer simulation.

    Taught: Alternate years, winter term.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 1160 - Introduction to Anthropology

    Goals: To enhance understanding and appreciation for human diversity. To introduce basic anthropological concepts and principles. To encourage analytic thinking.

    Content: Human behavior is explored in dynamic terms; that is, in terms of cultural coherence, social change, and symbolic interaction. Topics to be covered include how a society adapts to its environment, how people organize themselves in social units, how language serves social purposes, and how religious practices are integrated with other aspects of a culture.

    Taught: Annually.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 1200 - Introduction to Field Methods in Archaeology

    Goals: To introduce the methods and theory of field archaeology as part of an on-site excavation project.

    Context: Varies depending on type of site being excavated. Basic techniques covered include survey, mapping, record keeping, excavation and field conservation.

    Taught: Annually, summers.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 1200 - LAB: Introduction to Field Methods in Archaeology

    This lab must be taken concurrently with the ANTH 1200 lecture. The lab itself has zero credit value.

    ANTH 1240 - The Ancient Maya

    Goals: To have a focused exploration of the various epistemologies related to how we know what we know about the ancient Maya of Mesoamerica. To document the ancient cultural trajectories of the Maya region from the earliest human colonization during Pleistocene times through the arrival of the Spanish in the sixteenth century. To become familiar with and to compare archaeological and ethnohistoric information, theories, and controversies related to the emergence and sustainability and eventual collapse of ancient Maya civilization, and as well, to recognize the cultural continuities characterizing modern Maya descendent communities.

    Content: The ancient Maya culture flourished in what are now southern Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and parts of adjacent Honduras and El Salvador. There in southern Mesoamerica—in a tropical environment viewed by many as “hostile”—we find monumental architectural complexes, a refined great art style, and evidence of a truly impressive and sophisticated civilization. The Maya region has evidence of some of the largest and most densely packed populations known until the advent of industrialization and modern medical advances. Their “experiment” in civilization had some fatal flaws that brought about their downfall around A.D. 900—centuries before the arrival of the Europeans. We stand to learn much from their experience.

    Taught: Alternate years, fall term.

    Prerequisites: None; ANTH 1160 is recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 1300 - Ethnography: Text and Film

    Goals: To introduce students to written and cinematic ethnography, the representations of the peoples and cultures that anthropologists produce. To introduce students to basic anthropological concepts and current debates concerning the ethnographic representation of cultures.

    Content: Ethnography is the primary method by which sociocultural anthropologists communicate the results of their investigations into the cultures they study. This course will investigate ethnography–both written and pictorial–as a means of communicating cross-cultural difference. A close reading of ethnography is combined with screenings of numerous ethnographic films, a selection of key theoretical articles, lecture and discussion to understand the relationship between media and the representation of culture. How does one translate experience into text or images? Is “culture” the source or the product of these attempts? How do anthropological attempts at representing culture in ethnographic books and film relate to fiction and entertainment?

    Taught: Alternate years, winter term.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 1410 - Indonesian Music and Cultures

    Crosslisted: Also listed as MUS 1410.

    Goals: Designed for both musicians and nonmusicians, this course is an introduction to the music and cultures of Indonesia. One component is a hands-on introduction to the musical techniques and cultural significance of the Javanese gamelan orchestra, taught by Mr. Joko Sutrisno, Music Director of the Indonesian Performing Arts Association of Minnesota (IPAAM), using instruments on loan from the Schubert Club. In the anthropology side of the class, students will explore the wider social and cultural context in which this tradition is rooted by reading anthropological, literary, historical, and other social science accounts from Indonesia. The goals of the class are: 1) to acquire basic skills in playing gamelan music, a sense of its cultural significance, and an awareness of its social context; and 2) to gain a sense of the history and cultural diversity of Indonesia as a nation-state.

    Content: The musical part of the class will involve daily playing in class and outside, regular journal-writing, and a final public recital. The anthropological part of the class will involve readings, lectures, film, and discussions. Written assignments will include journal entries, a midterm test, and short essays.

    Taught: Annually, winter term.

    Credits: 4 credits

      ANTH 1530 - Human Evolution

    Goals: To understand the process of biological evolution and the evolution of the human species.

    Content: Study of evolutionary theory, population genetics, comparative primate anatomy and behavior, evolution of social behavior, fossil evidence for primate and hominid evolution, origins of bipedalism, tools.

    Taught: Annually.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 1530 - LAB: Human EvolutioN

    This lab must be taken concurrently with the ANTH 1530 lecture. The lab itself has zero credit value.

    ANTH 3010 - Issues in Anthropology I

    Goals: ANTH 3010, in combination with ANTH 3020, provides students with a year long gateway seminar exploring the anthropology major at Hamline University. Students will examine anthropology’s four fields, theoretical perspectives, and ethical issues through readings, discussions, lectures, and exercises. The goal of this course is to help anthropology majors successfully navigate their undergraduate education and prepare for their post undergraduate career. Students will begin working on their anthropology portfolio, develop disciplinary specific research and writing skills, and become familiar with the different methodological and theoretical approaches of anthropology’s four fields. Ideally, students should take these courses in their sophomore year in conjunction with declaring a major (or for transfer students, during their first year at Hamline). Students need to take both ANTH 3010 and ANTH 3020, although these courses do not need to be taken in sequence.

    Content: The main focus of this course will be a survey of current issues in anthropology (e.g., the utility of the concept of race; the role of the environment in cultural change; the uniqueness of human language; the responsibilities of anthropologists to the people they study). We will approach these issues through critical reading of text, individual research, and group discussion. Students will also learn about the anthropology department and major including resources and responsibilities of the major, careers in anthropology, anthropology as vocation and anthropology in the media. Guest speakers, including alumni; will be brought in to talk about graduate school, professional development, and applied anthropology.

    Taught: ANTH 3010 is offered during fall semester of each year while ANTH 3020 is offered during spring semester of each year.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3020 - Issues in anthropology II

    Goals: ANTH 3010, in combination with ANTH 3020, provides students with a year long gateway seminar exploring the anthropology major at Hamline University. Students will examine anthropology’s four fields, theoretical perspectives, and ethical issues through readings, discussions, lectures, and exercises. The goal of this course is to help anthropology majors successfully navigate their undergraduate education and prepare for their post undergraduate career. Students will begin working on their anthropology portfolio, develop disciplinary specific research and writing skills, and become familiar with the different methodological and theoretical approaches of anthropology’s four fields. Ideally, students should take these courses in their sophomore year in conjunction with declaring a major (or for transfer students, during their first year at Hamline). Students need to take both ANTH 3010 and ANTH 3020, although these courses do not need to be taken in sequence.

    Content: The main focus of this course will be a survey of current issues in anthropology (e.g., the utility of the concept of race; the role of the environment in cultural change; the uniqueness of human language; the responsibilities of anthropologists to the people they study). We will approach these issues through critical reading of text, individual research, and group discussion. Students will also learn about the anthropology department and major including resources and responsibilities of the major, careers in anthropology, anthropology as vocation and anthropology in the media. Guest speakers, including alumni; will be brought in to talk about graduate school, professional development, and applied anthropology.

    Taught: ANTH 3020 is offered during spring semester of each year while ANTH 3010 is offered during fall semester of each year.

    Prerequisites: ANTH 1160  or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 2 credits  

    ANTH 3100 - Principles of ArchaeologY

    Goals: To understand principles of archaeology–the varying ways archaeologists recover, analyze, and interpret information about the past. To gain proficiency in general scientific practices, reading archaeological literature, and grant writing. To consider ethical and practical issues in the management of cultural resources, such as why preserve heritage sites, and how to balance the sometimes conflicting views, voices, and histories found in our contemporary world.

    Content: Archaeologists are “time detectives” sifting through the material traces of past lives in order to better understand human behavior and human history. Using films, slides, artifacts, and readings, this course focuses on current methods and theories used in American archaeology. Students apply their knowledge by writing a research design as a final project.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3110 - Arctic Archaeology

    Goals: To understand how human societies have survived, and occasionally flourished in the Arctic, one of the world’s most extreme environments. To learn about the unique challenges and opportunities faced by archaeologists working in the Far North.

    Content: This course draws on the Arctic’s well-preserved archaeology and its rich ethnographic and historic records to explore human settlement, adaptation, and cultural evolution in the circumpolar world. This course uses readings, films, and artifacts to examine the story from the first Arctic inhabitants more than 14,000 years ago to the arrival of Europeans (Vikings in the east and Russians in the west) between 1000 and 250 years ago. Major anthropological issues covered in this course include investigating the causes for hunter-gatherer diversity; the interactions between gender, labor, and economy in Arctic societies; the role of migration, diffusion, and interaction in prehistory; and the relationships between maritime economies and cultural complexity.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3120 - Experimental Archaeology

    Goals: To teach students advanced archaeological theory and laboratory methods. Students, working in teams, will design and implement research projects in ethnoarchaeology and/or experimental archaeology.

    Content: One of the principle challenges faced by archaeologists wanting to learn about past human cultures is how to study the behavior of humans whom we cannot directly observe, but only understand through the physical clues they left behind. Ethnoarchaeology and experimental archaeology are two powerful tools that help archaeologists meet this challenge. Ethnoarchaeology, observing contemporary human behavior, and experimental archaeology, research that replicates under controlled conditions, behavior of interest, provide insight into the relationships between specific human actions and the archaeological evidence of these actions. The content of this course will include readings extracted from classic examples of experimental and ethnoarchaeological research. We will also engage in advanced laboratory analyses in order to identify specific research questions that students wish to address through their own experimental or ethnoarchaeological research project. Students who have taken an archaeological field methods or laboratory methods course are strongly encouraged to register.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 3210 or ANTH 3220 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3130 - Excavating Hamline History

    Goals: To have students participate as part of an interdisciplinary team excavating a historic site on or near campus. This archaeological excavation is part of research focused on the early history of “Hamline Village.” It is also a public archaeology project with the goal of involving people from throughout the local community including Hancock Elementary students, neighborhood residents, and University alumni.

    Content: Students learn basic archaeological field and laboratory methods, principles of historic archaeology, and anthropological approaches to material culture studies through readings and lectures, but primarily through participation. This course emphasizes archaeology as a holistic discipline linking the humanities, fine arts, social sciences, and natural sciences. Students help provide this interdisciplinary perspective by contributing to the overall research, educational, and public archaeology goals through individual and collaborative projects.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3210 - Advanced Field Methods in Archaeology

    Goals: To gain additional competence in, and advanced theoretical understanding of, the field methods in archaeology.

    Content: Students learn how to map using an alidade or transit and are trained in field photography, flotation techniques, soil sampling and planning excavation strategy.

    Taught: Annually, summers.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1200.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3220 - Laboratory Techniques in Archaeology

    Goals: To introduce laboratory methods in archaeology.

    Content: Basic laboratory techniques including accessioning procedures, artifact analysis, preservation techniques and a basic introduction to cartography, photography and faunal/floral analysis.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160.

    Credits: 4 credits 

    ANTH 3220 - LAB: Laboratory Techniques in Archaeology

    This lab must be taken concurrently with the ANTH 3220 lecture. The lab itself has zero credit value.

    ANTH 3230 - Made in China: The Cultures of Economic Transformation

    Goals: To examine the function of the global production system and the links that bind and transform communities, cultures, nations, and individuals across the global geography. This course focuses on the case of China and its relationship to the US and specifically Minnesota-based transnational corporations. It will examine how the forces that bring goods “made in China” to the shelves of American stores have themselves transformed the lives and lifeways of the people living in China.

    Content: This course is designed to provide students with basic knowledge of historical, socioeconomic, and political contexts that will enable them to engage with contemporary China in an informed and knowledgeable manner. It has been designed as explicitly interdisciplinary and will draw upon topics and materials from history, political science, economics, and anthropology. Familiarity with Chinese is not necessary, but language students are strongly encouraged to consider this course. The standard course itinerary includes visits to the cities of Beijing, Datong, Nanjing, Suzhou, and Shanghai.

    Taught: Alternate years, extended spring term in China.

    Prerequisite: None; an introductory anthropology course and some Chinese language would be helpful.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3240 - Ancient and Modern Maya of Yucatan

    Goals: To directly familiarize the students with the prehistory, history, and present-day conditions of the Maya of the Yucatan Peninsula of southern Mexico. The ancient Maya constructed large architectural complexes and were able to sustain some of the largest, most densely-packed populations the world has known until the advent of industrialization and modern medical advances. They were accomplished astronomers and mathematicians. They provide us with an example of a culture that developed a complex state and civilization in an environment many view as “hostile.” Their “experiment” in civilization had some fatal flaws that brought about their downfall around A.D. 900—centuries before the arrival of the Europeans. We stand to learn much from their experience.

    Content: Using on-site visits to archaeological and historical sites, museums, to modern Maya communities, students become acquainted with the prehistory, history, and the rural-to-urban ethnographic spectrum of the Maya people of Yucatan. Students are confronted by a variety of alternative explanations and issue-oriented perspectives that deal specifically with the Maya area.

    Taught: Alternate years, winter term in Yucatan, Mexico.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3250 - Ancient Civilizations of the Mexican Highlands

    Goals: To directly familiarize students with the ancient civilizations of central Mesoamerica as well as with the history and present-day conditions of the peoples of central Mexico. At sites such as Teotihuacan, Tula, El Tajin, Xochicalco, Monte Alban, and Mexico/Tenochtitlan students will have an opportunity to see firsthand the large archaeological sites that testify to the emergence of the varied ancient civilizations of the Mexican highlands ranging from the Olmec–the suggested “parent” culture of Mesoamerica–to that of later Teotihuacan, the Totonac, Zapotec, Mixtec, Toltec, and finally Aztec cultures.

    Content: Using on-site visits to archaeological and historical sites, museums, and modern Mexican highland indigenous communities, students become acquainted with the prehistory, history, and the rural-to-urban ethnographic spectrum of the cultures of central Mexico. Students are confronted by a variety of alternative explanations and issue-oriented perspectives that deal specifically with the central area of Mesoamerica.

    Taught: Alternate years, extended spring term in central Mexico.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3260 - Pilgrims, Travelers, Tourists

    Goals: To introduce students to the history and sociocultural contexts of various forms of travel from religious pilgrimage to the rise of mass tourism and how each structures knowledge and experience of other places and peoples.

    Content: Historical and contemporary travel narratives, ethnography, films, and guest lectures will be supplemented with theoretical essays to examine the power of the practice of travel in various forms both historical and contemporary. This course will emphasize the connections and tensions between various forms of the journey and issues such as self-knowledge, authenticity, class, the nature of “others,” and the construction of “culture.”

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160 or GLOB 1910, or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3270 - Exploring Ancient Southeast Asia

    Goals: To directly familiarize students with the evidence for the emergence and development of the prehistoric cultures of Mainland Southeast Asia by focusing on the rich archaeological record found in Thailand, Cambodia, and their neighbors. To acquaint students with the history and present-day conditions of the peoples of that area.  Beginning with early sites such as Ban Chiang and the Pha Taem Rock Paintings site through later complex sites such as Phimai, Phanom Rung, Angkor, Sukhothai, and Ayutthaya, students have an opportunity to see firsthand the major archaeological sites that testify to the emergence of the varied ancient civilizations of Southeast Asia—ranging from the earliest village sites through the impressive architectural and hydraulic management legacies of Khmer domination, through the period when Thai civilization was born and came to politically and culturally dominate much of the Southeast Asian mainland.

    Content: Using on-site visits to archaeological and historical sites, museums and modern indigenous communities, students become acquainted with the prehistory, history, and the rural to urban ethnographic spectrum of the cultures of Southeast Asia.  Students are confronted by a variety of alternative explanations and issue oriented perspectives that deal specifically with Mainland Southeast Asian concerns.

    Taught: Alternate years, winter term in Southeast Asia.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3280 - Ancient Civilizations of Southeast Asia

    Goals: To offer an interdisciplinary survey of the complex cultural diversity that characterized ancient Southeast Asia (Cambodia, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Myanmar, Malaysia, Indonesia). To be aware of, to be able to synthesize, and to be able to evaluate how archaeological anthropologists have employed analytical techniques and systemic perspectives to understand prehistoric traditions culminating in the formation of the complex societies and states of ancient Southeast Asia.

    Content: Comparative archaeological and primary and secondary historical information, theories, and controversies related to the origins of the various cultures and civilizations (ancient Hoabhinian, Ban Chiang through later Khmer, Thai, Burmese, Malay, Indonesian cultures) that flourished in ancient Southeast Asia from the earliest human colonization during Pleistocene times to the arrival of Islam and the European powers.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3300 - Ethnographic Research Methods

    Goals: To gain experience with a variety of ethnographic research methods and techniques.

    Content: Reading and discussion of exemplary ethnographies; delimiting a social field in which to conduct research; generating a research proposal; establishing rapport with members of the community; making observations of human behavior in natural settings; and documenting ethnographic data (through written field notes, interviews and transcripts, photography, audio- or video-recordings, etc.).

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3310 - Ancient Civilizations of Middle America

    Goals: To offer an interdisciplinary survey of the complex cultural diversity that characterized ancient Mesoamerica (central to southern Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, Western Honduras, El Salvador). To be aware of, to be able to synthesize, and to be able to evaluate how archaeological anthropologists have employed analytical techniques and systemic perspectives to understand prehistoric cultural dynamics that contributed to the rise of the various prehistoric complex societies of ancient Middle America.

    Content: Comparative archaeological and ethnohistorical information, theories, and controversies related to the various cultures and civilizations (Olmec, Zapotec, Mixtec, Totonac, Teotihuacan, Maya, Toltec, Aztec) that flourished in Mesoamerica from the earliest human colonization during Pleistocene times through the arrival of the Spanish in the sixteenth century.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3320 - North American Archaeology

    Goals: To offer an interdisciplinary survey of the complex cultural diversity that characterized ancient North America (Canada, the United States, and northern Mexico). To be aware of, to be able to synthesize, and to be able to evaluate how archaeological anthropologists have employed analytical techniques and systemic perspectives to understand prehistoric cultural dynamics that contributed to the emergence and development of the various archaeological traditions of ancient North America.

    Content: Comparative archaeological and ethnohistorical information, theories, and controversies related to the various regional archaeological traditions that developed in North America from the earliest human colonization during Pleistocene times through the arrival of the Europeans.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3330 - North American Indian History and Cultures

    Goals: To provide experience in ecological and functional analysis of traditional American Indian cultures. To gain an understanding of the implications of historic and contemporary social policies for American Indians.

    Content: In-depth examination of the ecological adaptation of one or more indigenous North American cultures. Use of the Science Museum of Minnesota collections in the functional analysis of artifacts from a variety of culture areas. History of U.S. Government policy and contemporary problems. Extensive use is made of films, ethnographies, novels, poetry, and biographical materials.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3340 - Exploring the Ancient Civilizations of Peru

    Goals: To directly familiarize students on site in Peru with the prehistory, history, and present day conditions of the peoples of Andes, their diverse ecosystems ranging from the arid coastal deserts to the high mountains. Ancient civilizations in the Andes attained a high degree of sophistication, producing large architectural complexes, a wide range of artistic and craft forms, and complex political organizations, culminating in the Inca Empire. This course will provide comparative archaeological and ethnohistorical information, theories, and controversies related to the various cultures and civilizations that flourished there (Chavin, Cupisnique, Chimu, through that of the Quechua-speaking Inca) from the earliest human colonization during Pleistocene times through the sixteenth century arrival of Francisco Pizarro to current times.

    Content: Using on-site visits to archaeological and historical sites, museums, and to modern rural through urban communities, students will become aware of, be able to synthesize, and be able to evaluate how archaeological anthropologists have employed analytical techniques and systemic perspectives to understand prehistoric cultural dynamics that contributed to the rise of the various complex societies of ancient Peru. In addition to archaeological concerns, students become acquainted with the diverse ecologies and the rural-to-urban ethnographic spectrum of the cultures of contemporary Peruvian Andean life. Students are confronted by a variety of alternative explanations and issue-oriented perspectives that deal specifically with the Andean region.

    Taught: Alternate years, winter term in Peru.

    Prerequisite: None; ANTH 3470 is recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3360 - Race: Biological Fact or Cultural Construct?

    Goals: To understand and critically evaluate the concept of race in the history of anthropology and to understand the role anthropology has played in the development of a Euro-American racial world view. To understand the biological processes that produce clinical patterns of human variation and the distinction between these processes and the cultural construction of racial categories.

    Content: The race concept, biological determinism, Boasian opposition to racial determinism, polytypic human variation and adaptation, behavioral genetics, American racial world view and its attitudinal, behavioral, and institutional manifestation as racism.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3370 - Minnesota Archaeology

    Goal: To study the 10,000-year history of the peoples and cultures of what is now Minnesota, with special emphasis on American Indian history from glacial times through the European invasion and the treaty period of the 1800s.

    Content: Examination of changing perceptions of American Indian history. Material culture is examined in relationship to environment and life ways. The role of the world view and spirituality in harmonizing lifestyle with the environment.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3390 - Performing Africa in Ghana

    Goals: Travel to Ghana (in West Africa) and study at the Dagara Music and Arts Center outside of Accra. Work with Ghanaian professionals in the arts of drumming, dancing, xylophone, and so forth, as a vehicle for appreciating how performance encounters create the place of Africa in the contemporary world.

    Content: Paulla Ebron’s book Performing Africa will set the stage for class discussions and individual reflections in this short-term study abroad course. Questions that students explore include: How are African countries using performance of “traditional culture” to bolster their national economies? How is “world music” implicated in Africa’s economic development performance? What is African history if not competing performances of tales from the past? How does the performance of national history help us explore racial politics from a global perspective? As we consume African performances (through music, television, and news) and “perform Africa” ourselves (through singing, dancing, and drumming), how can we make ethical sense of the poverty, disease, and despair we know to be rampant across the continent, and how Africa gets produced, circulated, and consumed through performance.

    Taught: Alternate years, extended spring term.

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3410 - Africa, Music, and Cultural Production

    Crosslisted: Also listed as MUS 1415

    Goals: To acquaint students with instrumental resources and structures in West African music, while simultaneously learning about social life and cultural production in African worlds.

    Content: In Africa and African diasporas, music has always been and continues to be a vital form of cultural expression. This course focuses on cultural production and the formation of identities in contemporary Africa, through exploring how African/Black music contributes to the ways in which Africa is represented and consumed in the world. In theoretical terms, the course will query how Africa is produced in the global imagination through performance, but students will also gain practical experience with drum ensemble music. Using indigenous instruments and an African approach to musical training, the class will learn rhythms and songs from West Africa, and also become exposed to African/Black music from other parts of the world.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3415 - Africa in Crisis

    Goals: To learn about the cultural consequences for Africans of consistent exploitation of the continent’s natural resources and its human beings. To interrogate the reasons for said “exploitation,” and explore specific responses and resistances to socio-political turmoil in given locales.

    Content: Immersion in current journalistic, literary, cultural, and cinematic representations of various “crises” on the continent. Students will become more aware of root causes of some of the strife and destitution they often associate with Africa as a result of Hollywood and mass media representations. The course is reading, film-viewing, and speaking-intensive. Students will learn a method of discussing emotionally charged issues (human experiences with genocide, corruption and brutality, drought, famine, political oppression, rape, AIDS, and so forth) by honoring all class members’ input and perspectives.

    Taught: Alternate years, fall.

    Prerequisite: None.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3420 - African Ensemble

    Crosslisted: Also listed as MUS 1420

    Goal and content: Performance of African and Afro-American drum ensemble styles involving vocal performance as well as indigenous instruments.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: None.

    Credits: 1 credit each term

    Department: Anthropology, Music

    ANTH 3430 - Transnational Migration and Diasporic Communities

    Goals: To understand the migratory routes, transnational linkages, and imaginative connections maintained by globally dispersed peoples in the contemporary world. To prepare sensitive and informed global citizens ready to apply their understandings to address social and political issues of the day.

    Content: Interdisciplinary approach to the study of migration and diasporas. Instructor introduces theoretical perspectives. Instructor and guest experts present model case studies. Students research and present additional case studies.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160 or GLOB 1910.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3440 - Human Osteology and Skeletal Identification

    Goals: To develop a basic knowledge of human osteology, including human bone identification and human functional anatomy. To understand the methods and techniques for skeletal identification and for the reconstruction of life histories from bone that may be applied in both recent forensic and ancient archaeological contexts.

    Content: Human osteology, functional anatomy, bone biology, techniques for determination of age-at-death, sex, stature and for identifying skeletal indicators of biological affinity, trauma, disease and general health. A case study approach leads to the production of a forensic or osteobiographical report on a set of skeletal remains.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits  

    ANTH 3440 - LAB: Human Osteology and Skeletal Identification

    This lab must be taken concurrently with the ANTH 3440 lecture. The lab itself has zero credit value.

    ANTH 3450 - Bioarchaeology

    Goals: To explore how the study of human skeletal remains and the collaboration of biological anthropologists and archaeologists, using a regional population approach, have enhanced our knowledge of the bio-cultural adaptation of humans.

    Content: Bones are eloquent voices from the past. From the single skeleton of the Iceman Otzi to the preserved remains at Vesuvius or the remains of Finnish immigrants in northern Minnesota, human skeletal remains have much to reveal about the past. Problem oriented research topics include the peopling of North America, the biological consequences of the shift to agriculture, the effects of contact and European colonization on populations of the Americas, and the origin and expression of warfare. Methodological approaches include mortuary archaeology, paleodemography, paleopathology, dietary reconstruction, biodistance, biomechanics, and bone chemistry. The ethical and legal factors affecting the study of human remains are also considered.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160. ANTH 3440 is strongly recommended.

    Credits: 4 credits 

    ANTH 3460 - From Development to GlobalizatioN

    Goals: This course surveys the socio-cultural, economic, political relationships that bind the lives of those at the global center with those at the periphery–offering historical and contemporary contexts for understanding the profound disparities in wealth, health, life expectancy, population density, and access to opportunity evident in our world.

    Content: Socio-cultural and historical contexts are introduced and investigated through an emphasis on primary sources, theoretical essays and course lectures, supplemented with two ethnographic case studies. Throughout the course students will be challenged to understand the context of the contemporary world system and their place in it. Drawing broadly on contemporary literature from economics, political science, rural sociology, and anthropology this course will focus on issues such as: postcoloniality, the global division of labor, global production, cultures of consumption, global poverty, Cold War developmentalism, intellectual property issues, post-modernism, and social responses to globalization.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits 

    ANTH 3480 - Cultural Ecology

    Goal: To discuss and analyze how anthropologists have developed and applied the ecosystem concept to questions about how modern and ancient peoples have interacted with their environment. To understand how anthropologists have developed systems models of cultures as finely attuned adaptive systems. To learn how to develop explanatory models that relate cultural behavior to ecological considerations.

    Content: The comparative development of human cultural adaptive strategies to the major ecosystems of this planet: arctic, arid zone, grasslands (temperate and tropical), high altitude systems, and forests (boreal, temperate, and tropical). The methodologies and techniques employed in cultural ecological studies.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3490 - Language, Culture, and Society

    Goals: To explore the relationship between: a) language structure and performance; b) world view, cultural categories, values, beliefs, attitudes, folk models, and ideologies; and c) social action, organization, relations, and events. To think about the ways in which language is embedded in social contexts of use by reading about other speech communities and reflecting upon our own.

    Content: A mix of theoretical discussions and empirical examples from both western and non-western traditions, past and present, and field observations by students of language use. Ethnographic examples from American Indian and immigrant groups.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisite: None.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3500 - Forensic Anthropology 

    Goals: This course will introduce students to the scope of knowledge, theories, and skills forensic anthropologists bring to forensic death investigations. Students will develop and practice problem solving and critical thinking through close observation, evidence analysis, and presentation of results through written reports and oral testimony.

    Content: Location and recovery of remains, death scene investigation, dental analysis, time-since-death estimates, interpretation of trauma and pathology, and applications to international human rights violations. In addition, students will critically evaluate the scientific foundation of analytical techniques applied by forensic anthropologists. Results of investigations performed during class will be presented in both oral and written form.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160 or CJFS 3560, or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3500 - LAB: Forensic Anthropology

    This lab must be taken concurrently with the ANTH 3500 lecture. The lab itself has zero credit value.

    ANTH 3530 - Culture, Illness, and Health

    Goals: To introduce students to the subdiscipline of medical anthropology, and to study health, illness, and healing from a cross-cultural perspective.

    Content: The study of affliction and healing in non-Western as well as Western societies; ways in which the social construction of well-being affects therapy managing strategies across a range of human societies; analysis of how power is utilized to privilege some sectors and deprive other groups of basic standards of community health; and the meaning of signs of sickness and suffering as a way of interpreting their relationship to broader social themes including technology, ritual, and religion. The course is designed to provide students with a framework for understanding the historical and social construction of healing practices and beliefs.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisites: Previous coursework in anthropology or the social sciences.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3540 - Museums, Exhibitions, and Representation

    Goals: This course presents students with an introduction to museums and exhibitions, and their social, political, and cultural roles in society. It provides students with basic theoretical approaches for examining the power and politics of collection, display and representation at work in museums. It examines specific examples of the ways that museums and exhibitions provide spaces for articulating and practicing different communities and identities, and their relationship to “others.” Finally, the course provides students with an introduction to aspects of museum collection, exhibit design, and public interpretation.

    Content: The course is taught using a mixture of theoretical readings, ethnographies, field excursions to local museums, and a student field project. Topics covered include: a basic introduction to the history of collecting and display; the beginnings and institutionalization of museums; different museums and their publics; theories of representation and cultural production; and the design, collection, and curation of museum exhibits.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3570 - Religion, Culture, and the State

    Crosslisted: Also listed as REL 3570.

    Goals: To introduce students to the sociopolitical and intellectual issues posed by the intersection of claims on and by people in the name of “religion,” “culture,” and “the state.” To investigate the contested relationship between modern nation-states and religions. To prepare sensitive and informed global citizens ready to apply their understandings to address issues of the day.

    Content: Theoretical and methodological discussion, followed by case studies presented by guest experts and by students.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160 or REL 1100 or GLOB 1910.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 3580 - Cultural Psychology

    Goals: To investigate the ways in which culture and psyche make each other up, and to gain experience conducting interviews.

    Content: Beginning with the premise that all psychologies are “ethno-psychologies” and systems of health care are best understood when approached through the matrix of culture, this course will explore a wide range of issues broadly construed under the category of cultural psychology and mental health. Lectures and readings focus on the “borderland” between anthropology, psychiatry/psychology, and medicine. Students conduct person-centered ethnographic interviews in order to analyze the ways individuals tend to think of themselves in relation to their cultural worlds.

    Taught: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite: ANTH 1160 or PSY 1330.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 5260 - Anthropological Thought and Theory

    Goals: To become familiar with the kinds of explanations and methods anthropologists have used and/or are currently using to analyze cultural phenomena. To develop critical thinking.

    Content: Theoretical statements and exemplary analyses covering a spectrum of approaches employed by 19th and 20th century anthropologists.

    Taught: Annually.

    Prerequisites: At least two 3000-level anthropology courses.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ANTH 5270- Senior Seminar

    Goals: The goal of the course is to provide anthropology majors, in the final semester of their senior year, the opportunity to bring together the variety of content and knowledge from various anthropology courses they have taken to broadly address theoretical or conceptual issues of contemporary relevance in anthropology.

    Goals: The goal of the course is to provide anthropology majors, in the final semester of their senior year, the opportunity to bring together the variety of content and knowledge from various anthropology courses they have taken to broadly address theoretical or conceptual issues of contemporary relevance in anthropology.

    Taught: One senior seminar is offered in rotation by an anthropology department faculty member during the spring semester of each year.

    Prerequisites: ANTH 1160 and at least one 3000-level anthropology course, or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

  • News
    • hamline-to-hamline-collaboration-thumb
      The Hamline to Hamline Collaboration is offering grants for collaborative programming and/or events that enrich the collaboration between Hamline Elementary and Hamline University. Applications are due by May 12th, 2014.
    • Senior Jenna Potter, an English major and German and communications double minor at Hamline, was awarded the prestigious Fulbright Scholarship to teach in Hamburg, Germany. Senior Libby Otto named as alternate to Norway.
    • A group of 43 undergraduate students and faculty attended the 2014 National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR) in Lexington, KY from April 2 through April 5. Students presented 35 different projects that resulted from their collaborative research at Hamline.
    •  
  • Events
    Apr. 24
    12 - 1 p.m.
    Apr. 24
    6 - 7:30 p.m.
    Apr. 24
    7 - 9 p.m.
    Apr. 25
    11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
    More