• MBA Courses

    Module 1

    Leadership Skills Development (3 credits)
    The concepts of management and leadership are often compared. One way to define leadership in a managerial context is that leadership is the extent to which a manager has influence over others above and beyond their position-based power or authority. This component of Module 1 will help students develop two distinct sets of skills that will help them become leaders: self-leadership and team building. Topics will be introduced in regular class settings and then be developed through intensive full-day workshops and follow-up activities.

    Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
    Managing people requires a broad range of interdisciplinary knowledge and skills. To be effective, managers must have solid planning and organizational skills. They must also have solid understanding of human behavior, and how human behavioral tendencies affect and are affected by organizational systems, processes, and interactions. This component of Module 1 helps students develop the knowledge and skills needed to effectively manage people in organizations. Topics include fundamentals of social cognition, individual differences, judgment and decision making, motivation, organizational power and politics, managerial communication, human resource management, and conflict management.

    Critical Thinking (2 credits)
    It is a challenging objective to raise student skills in critical and analytical thinking. This course's purpose is just that. Through exploring today's complex business problems, students will develop a critical thinking attitude while learning how to apply an array of critical thinking skills. Emphasis will be placed on using logical reasoning supported by qualitative and quantitative evidence to identify problems, evaluate alternatives, and justify decisions. It is expected that students will become better listeners, more capable communicators - both in writing and speaking - as well as better at reflecting upon their own thinking. This class is based on the premise that critical thinking and communication skills are best learned through practice. Therefore, repeated writing and speaking exercises will be core components of the class, and students will receive training and practice as well as instructor and peer feedback to help them improve their skills.

    Module 2

    Financial Accounting (3 credits)
    This course in an introduction to the external accounting systems used by U.S. organizations to report their financial position to external users such as stockholders, creditors, and potential investors. Students will develop an understanding of the Balance Sheet, Income Statement, and Statement of Cash Flows. By the end of the course, students will be able to read and interpret financial statements.

    Managerial Accounting (3 credits) 
    This course will build on financial accounting principles and examine the tools that support management measurement and control of costs and operations. Financial forecasting and budgeting will be introduced for establishing performance targets. Cost volume and differential pricing techniques will be examined as tools for making tactical decisions. Budgeting, job order, and activity-based costing will be examined as tools for measuring day-to-day operations. Alternative performance measures will be examined for measuring progress towards strategic goals.

    Managerial Economics (2 credits)
    This course examines supply and demand and the effect of elasticity on price, income, and total revenue. With this foundation, marginal analysis and opportunity cost concepts will be introduced. The course will then examine how economic principles are impacted by different market structures (perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition and oligopoly). The course will conclude with analysis on how economics impacts strategy and business decision-making.

    Module 3

    Managerial Finance (3 credits) 
    Today, managers need to understand the fundamentals of financial management to make good decisions. This course covers the issues in finance that a manager is likely to encounter. It will be taught in two parts. The first portion of the course will discuss the financial statements, cash flows and the time value of money. Once we understand these basics, we will discuss issues surrounding corporate financing including equity and debt. We will discuss capital investment and how a company decides to allocate its resources in a value-maximizing manner. We will also discuss risk and return and how it ultimately affects the company's cost of capital. The second part of the course focuses on applying some of what we learned in the first part of the course. We will also discuss special topics such as mergers and acquisitions and international finance in this part of the course.

    Marketing Management (3 credits)
    Marketing expertise has emerged as a key requisite in determining the success of organizations. This course will prepare students to lead organizations through complex challenges in the local and global marketplace. State-of-the-art marketing practices, theories, case studies, and trends are blended into results-oriented actions that equip students with the skills and knowledge necessary to make sound marketing decisions.

    Managing the Global Marketplace (2 credits)
    Managers need a background in global trade to function in the international marketplace. We will cover globalization, outsourcing, and international trade theory. The discussions of the organization of international business and import-export issues will help students understand the planning involved in effectively moving a business into the global marketplace. There will be coverage of ethical issues in international transactions. Materials on cross-cultural negotiations, human resource issues and strategies for entering a specific international market will aid the students in negotiating a license agreement in class covering a specific product or service to be distributed in an international market.

    Module 4

    Electives (4 credits) 
    See electives listed below.

    Managerial IT (2 credits) 
    Organizations are only as strong as the combined effectiveness of its people, processes, and technology. The people manage and implement the business processes; technology is the key enabler of them. This course will examine how to understand and manage information technology to create and revitalize business processes, improve decision making, and gain competitive advantage. Selected major areas of IT critical to all managers and leaders will be surveyed using case studies as a core learning method.

    Business Law and Regulatory Environment (2 credits) 
    Business Law and Regulatory Environment provides a clear understanding of the basic principles of business law. Among the topics covered are contracts, sales, intellectual property, business organizations, agency, securities regulation, negotiable instruments, e-commerce and antitrust law. When the students complete the course they should be able to identify and work through common legal problems and ethical issues they will face in the workplace.

    Module 5

    Electives (4 credits) 
    See electives listed below.

    Strategic Financial Analysis (2 credits)

    Viewing strategy through the lens of financial performance sharpens (or enhances) management (or management capabilities). Whether evaluating alternative strategies, setting strategy-assessing metrics, or judging strategy implementation, financials play a paramount role. Strategic Financial Analysis is designed to provide students with both theory and hands-on analytical practice to analyze and support strategic decisions. 

    Strategic Management & Capstone/Field Study Part I (2 credits) 

    This competency integrates a broad understanding of business strategy with a practical field study experience. Strategy literature is evaluated to assess applicability of classic frameworks in the 21st century. Business cases are analyzed with a focus on competitive strategy, the economics of information, resource allocation, industry analytics, ethics, and the importance of mission and goals. The Capstone/Field Study competency challenges you to integrate and apply skills developed throughout your Hamline MBA education to issues being faced by an actual business organization by giving you the experience of serving as a consulting team for a designated client organization contemplating significant change or investment. Throughout this competency you will have numerous opportunities for dialogue with industry leaders, allowing you to blend theory and practice in understanding the complicated world of business today.

    Module 6

    Electives (4 credits)
    See electives listed below.
    Strategic Management & Capstone/Field Study Part II (4 credits)

    This competency integrates a broad understanding of business strategy wilth a practical field study experience. Strategy literature is evaluated to asseess applicability of classic frameworks in the 21st century. Business cases are analyzed with a focus on competitive strategy, the economics of information, resource allocation, industry analytics, ethics, and the importance of mission and goals. The Capstone/Field Study competency challenges you to integrate and apply skills developed throughout your Hamline MBA education to issues being faced by an actual business organization by giving you the experience of serving as a consulting team for a designated client organization contemplating significant change or investment. Throughout this competency you will have numerous opportunities for dialogue with industry leaders, allowing you to blend theory and practice in understanding the complicated world of business today.

     

    Electives

    MARKETING

    MBA 8098 Topics: Consumer Decision Making (4 credits)
    This course provides a comprehensive overview of consumer buying behavior and its implications for developing and implementing marketing strategies. Topics covered include consumer psychological processes such as motivation, perception, memory, attitudes, and self-concept, understanding external societal and cultural influences, and the consumer decision making process from problem recognition through to post-purchase behavior. The course will focus on consumer behavior but we will also discuss the implications for business to business marketing strategies.

    MBA 8052 Market Research (4 credits)
    Marketing strategy and decision making rely on accurate, useful information developed through marketing research activities. This course introduces you to the fundamentals of marketing research in order to prepare you to conduct basic research on your own or be a more informed consumer of sophisticated and specialized marketing research services. This course has an applied, skill-building focus, underlined with thorough understanding of marketing research principles. You will learn the typical research methods used to generate and analyze primary data in marketing research. You will also be exposed to and use standard sources of secondary data. Finally, you will undertake typical data analysis tasks used in marketing research.

    MBA 8053 International Marketing Management (4 credits)
    This course focuses on practical issues of participating in international markets. We discuss foreign direct investment, joint ventures, licensing and distribution agreements. Topics covered include exporting, supply chains, global human resource management, global marketing, and financial management in international business. We also examine entry strategies for doing business in global markets. The course includes both conceptual frameworks and contemporary applications. Students apply the topics covered by working in groups to develop an international marketing plan to enter a foreign market with a specific product or service

    FINANCE

    MBA 8020 Corporate Finance (4 credits)
    This course presents the theory and practice of corporate finance with case studies. Topics include concepts of corporate valuation, financial statement analysis and forecasting; the evaluation of capital investments under differing assumptions about risks and the state of the world; the financing choice for capital projects; the effects of debt, equity and derivative financial instruments on the value of the firm; dividend policy and other stakeholder forms of payment; corporate restructuring, bankruptcy, and mergers; and issues in corporate control and compensation.

    MBA 8021 Financial Institutions and Markets (4 credits)
    This course begins with a discussion of the financial system and financial institutions and the relationship between interest rates and security prices, the money market where interest rates are determined, and the role of the consumer and business and government in the financial markets. The course 1) examines how markets are organized and how trading occurs; and 2) establishes a framework for understanding how existing markets are set up, how trading occurs in them and how these markets evolve over time. The concentration is on securities markets and trading practices, but most of the principles developed are also applicable to other kinds of markets--markets for products, service, and information.

    MBA 8022 Finance Theory and Applications (4 credits) 
    This course covers the major decision-making areas of corporate finance and selected areas of financial history. Focusing on financial analysis and planning, corporate policies, valuation, and risk management. Topics will include firm capital structure and payout policy, short-term and long-term financial planning, options, risk management and derivates, and corporate restructuring. The course builds upon the topics covered in MBA 8220: Managerial Finance.

    INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT

    MBA 8030 Global Business (4 credits) 
    This course focuses on practical issues of global business. We discuss foreign direct investment, joint ventures, licensing and distribution agreements. Topics covered include exporting, counter trade, supply chains, global human resource management, global marketing, and financial management in international business. We also examine entry strategies for doing business in global markets. Students apply the topics covered by working in groups to develop an international marketing plan to enter a foreign market with a specific product or service.

    MBA 8031 International Business Transactions (4 credits)
    This course provides students with an understanding of selected types and forms of international business transactions. It examines the role of business organizations in these transactions and focuses on international dispute mechanisms and how business disputes are resolved using these mechanisms. Attention is given to regional trade agreements such as NAFTA, ASEAN, and MERCOSUR. The WTO, the United Nations ICSID, UNCITRAL, and non-governmental options such as the International Chamber of Commerce will also be examined. Some time is devoted to public and private international organizations and how they influence the resolution of business disputes. Specific international dispute centers, such as New York, London, and Stockholm are examined in light of their practices and procedures. International business transactions are an essential part of today’s business and dispute resolution methods utilized in resolving conflicts are essential for business graduates.

    MBA 8097 International Seminars (4 credits)
    MBA students can attend an international seminar as part of their degree. Recent seminars include ten-day trips to China, Germany, Dubai, and India. Each seminar earns four credits and includes both pre- and post-travel class meetings and written assignments. Foreign language ability is not required. Students are strongly encouraged to take at least one International Seminar. This course is required for the International Management concentration.

    Current international seminar offerings >

    CONFLICT MANAGEMENT

    MBA 8010 Negotiation Theory and Practice (4 credits)
    Through lecture and simulation, this course explores major themes in negotiation theory and practice, including distributive versus integrative bargaining, personality styles, multi-party negotiation, and ethical issues. Students are encouraged to reflect on the theoretical foundations that underly our actions and on the many considerations that influence effective and ethical negotiation practice.

    MBA 8011 People and Systems Design (4 credits)
    This course helps improve decisions, increase creativity, and enhance others’ performances as well as capacity to build a healthy, productive workplace. The classroom is a metaphor for “organization”. Students experience how conflict is managed individually and systemically. The class discerns patterns, roles, concerns, power differentials and differing workplace assumptions. Participants work in teams within the organization to design customized conflict responses. The course merges theory and practice, challenging students on best practices, conflict prevention tools, and alternative dispute resolution options. With a greater in-depth appreciation for workplace culture, systems and people, class team members will gain familiarity with the necessity of assessments, buy-in, design teams, development, implementation, roll-out and feedback loops. Participants build their capacity to manage conflict more effectively on a systemic basis using principles of organizational systems design.

    MBA 8012 Theories of Conflict (4 credits)
    This interdisciplinary course introduces students to important theoretical perspectives on our understanding of conflict, which has a profound impact on how each of us responds to conflict. The class provides the necessary foundation and context for understanding and evaluating the nature, sources, and dynamics of conflict and conflict interactions from a range of disciplinary perspectives, including biological, psycho-social, communication, symbolic, and structural theories, helping students better understand the assumptions underlying specific approaches to intervention.