• School of Business

  • Questions?

    School of Business
    651-523-2284
    hsb@hamline.edu

    Hamline Campus
    1536 Hewitt Ave.
    Saint Paul, MN 55104

    Minneapolis Center
    1600 Utica Ave. S.
    St. Louis Park, MN

    Amir Sabbagh
    Graduate Admissions Counselor
    651-523-2548
    asabbagh01@hamline.edu
      
    MS-A1740
    1536 Hewitt Avenue
    St. Paul, MN 55104-1284

  • Undergraduate Business Courses

    AccountinG Courses

    ACCT 1310 - Financial Accounting

    Goals: To familiarize the student with the methods and principles employed in financial accounting and with the interpretation of financial statements.

    Content: Introductory financial accounting procedures, reports, and principles.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ACCT 1320 - Managerial Accounting

    Goals: The course introduces students to the design and use of costing systems to support key operating and strategic directions of business firms.

    Content: There is a special emphasis on decision making in business and the role of management accounting in such decisions. The pace of the class is rigorous. Students will excel if they stay current and supplement in-class lectures by doing outside reading and assigned problems prior to class period.

    Prerequisites: ACCT 1310

    Credits: 4 credits 

    ACCT 3010 - Intermediate Accounting I

    Goals: Exposes students to the financial reporting system providing information for global resource allocation decisions embodied in U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

    Content: This course is first in a two part sequence, and focuses on the asset side of the balance sheet. Topics include the review of the basic financial statements, time value of money, receivables, property, plant and equipment, and intangibles.

    Prerequisite: ACCT 1310

    Credits: 4 credits

    ACCT 3020 - Intermediate Accounting II

    Goals: Building on the knowledge students gained in ACCT 3010, this second course in a two art sequence focuses on the liability and shareholders’ equity side of the balance sheet.

    Content: Topics include current liabilities, bonds, leases, deferred taxes, pensions and investments, as well as an in-depth look at the statement of cash flows.

    Prerequisite: ACCT 3010

    Credits: 4 credits

    ACCT 3030 - Cost Accounting

    Goals: An expansion of ACCT 1320, this course uses the principles and techniques used to account for and analyze costs incurred to produce goods or services.

    Content: Topics include job order, process, standard and variable costing techniques, in addition to cost-volume-profit relationships and budgeting techniques to forecast costs. Emphasis is placed on decision making using the various costing techniques.

    Prerequisite: ACCT 1320

    Credits: 4 credits

     ACCT 3310 - Triple Bottom Line

    Goals: Introduce students to the Triple Bottom Line approach assessing profit, social, and environmental impacts. Familiarize students with current approaches to measuring TBL outcomes, including GRI standards and Life Cycle Assessment.

    Content: Introduction to Triple Bottom Line accounting and comparison with Balanced Scorecard approach. Consideration of competing/overlapping priorities among profits, people, and the planet, review of B Corps, Sustainability/Corporate Social Responsibility Indices and Investing, and organizational culture around sustainable initiatives.
     
    Prerequisite: ACCT 1320, MGMT 3100

    Credits: 4 credits

    ACCT 5020 - Business Taxation

    Goals: The theory and practical application of federal income tax for individuals, partnerships and corporations under the laws enacted in the Internal Revenue Code.

    Prerequisite: ACCT 3010

    Credits: 4 credits

    ACCT 5030 - Advanced Accounting

    Goals: Advanced topics in accounting which include mergers and acquisitions, consolidated statements for a parent and subsidiary, foreign exchange, partnerships and bankruptcy.

    Content: Students will also gain exposure to non-profit and governmental accounting.

    Prerequisite: ACCT 3020

    Credits: 4 credits

    ACCT 5040 - Audit

    Goals: A study of the methods used to improve the quality of information for decision makers. Reliability of financial statements is essential for markets to function efficiently.

    Content: This course covers the processes and controls used to manage and operate businesses, assertions and agreements made to third parties, and regulatory compliance.

    Prerequisite: ACCT 3020

    Credits: 4 credits

    Economics Courses

    ECON 1310 - Microeconomic Analysis

    Goals: To introduce students to theory relating to the economic decisions made by individual consumers and firms in a market economy and to examine the role of government in domestic and international markets.

    Content: The topic of this course, deals in depth with choices, especially consumer behavior and the spending decisions, the production decisions of the business firm and how prices and wages are determined in the output and input markets. In addition, this course analyzes consumer and business behavior under various competitive and imperfect conditions, as well as the implications of these for society. We will also study the ramifications of various government policies, predicting the effects of those policies, both positive and negative, on market participants using events and situations in the world.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ECON 1320 - Macroeconomic Analysis

    Goals: To acquaint students with the structural framework and principles involved in the determination of the level of aggregate economic activity: national income, output, employment, money supply and demand, price levels and open economy macroeconomics.

    Content: Analysis of problems of unemployment, inflation, economic growth, trade, money and credit, balance of payments and government policy.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ECON 1330 - Statistics

    Goals: To acquaint students with major parametric and nonparametric statistical techniques.

    Content: Data organization, simple probability, and sampling distributions; estimation and hypothesis testing; regression and correlation; time series; selected non parametric tests.

    Prerequisites: None, though a basic understanding of algebra is expected. Credit will not be given for both ECON 1330 and PSY 1340 or ECON 1330 and MATH 1200.

    Credits: 4 credits

     ECON 1340 - Quantitative Analysis and Data Management

    Goals: To introduce frequently used data analysis techniques, to develop the quantitative skills necessary to use them, and to apply the methods in business decision-making settings.

    Content: The course will cover decision-making frameworks as well as data capture, analysis and presentation techniques. Topics such as budgeting, forecasting and regression will be explored using Excel and other relevant software or analytical tools.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1330; or PSY 1340; or MATH 1200.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ECON 3110 - Intermediate Microeconomics

    Goals: To deepen students’ understanding of microeconomic theory, building on the foundation they received in Microeconomic Analysis. Students will learn how to express, analyze, and interpret models of individual behavior using graphical, algebraic and calculus-based methods.

    Content:This course will examine theories of consumer and producer behavior in a variety of economic contexts. Optimization techniques, graphical analysis, and game theory methodology will be used to explore allocation decisions made inside households, firms or governmental units.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1310, ECON 1320, ECON 1330 or PSY 1340 or MATH 1200, and MATH 1170 or MATH 1162, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ECON 3120 - Intermediate Macroeconomics

    Goals: To understand and apply methods used in economics to analyze the gross domestic product, inflation, money supply and demand , employment levels, exchange rates and economic growth.

    Content: The course explores theories that explain the behavior of GDP and related variables. Keynesian, monetarist, and other models are studied.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: ECON 1310, ECON 1320, ECON 1330 or PSY 1340 or MATH 1200, and MATH 1170 or MATH 1162, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ECON 3700 - Managerial Economics
    Goals: To introduce students to applications of microeconomic theory and methodology and develop mathematical problem solving skills as they apply to business firm behavior.

    Content: Microeconomic applications: demand analysis, production and cost analysis, pricing, risk analysis, forecasting, linear programming, constrained and unconstrained optimization techniques.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1310, ECON 1320, ECON 1330 or PSY 1340 or MATH 1200, and ECON 1340 or MATH 1170 or MATH 1162, and junior or senior standing or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ECON 3710 - Labor Economics
    Goals: To provide students a well-balanced presentation of models of labor economics, applications, policies, and major analytic areas within labor economics. This course will also address labor market issues with race and gender perspectives.

    Content: Labor market analysis, labor unions and collective bargaining, government and the labor market, theories of labor market discrimination, wage differentials, poverty and income inequalities, and race and gender issues of the labor market.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1310, ECON 1320, ECON 1330 or PSY 1340 or MATH 1200, and ECON 1340 or MATH 1162, or MATH 1170 or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ECON 3720 - International Economic Development

    Goals: To gain understanding of the problems and issues of economic development and to examine and appraise the major prevailing approaches to those problems.

    Content: Developing as well as high-income market economy perspectives; concepts of growth and development; major contemporary approaches; diversity among the Third World countries; dualism; cultural factors; population, labor, migration and education; poverty and inequality; strategies for investment and structural transformations; international trade, investment and development; planning, control, and macroeconomic policies.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1310, ECON 1320, ECON 1330 or PSY 1430 or MATH 1200, and ECON 1340 or MATH 1170 or MATH 1162, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ECON 3730 - International Trade and Finance

    Goals: To acquaint students with the evolving patterns of trade and investments in the global economic environment and with the major issues confronting national and international institutions of trade and finance.

    Content: Topics covered include theories of foreign trade with perfect and imperfect competition. Trade policy issues, protectionism, and U.S. trade policies and its institutional settings. The effects of growth and factor mobility on trade, balance of payments, foreign exchange markets, foreign exchange regimes, foreign exchange determination, and economic policy in open economy.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1310, ECON 1320, ECON 1330 or PSY 1430 or MATH 1200, and ECON 1340 or MATH 1170 or MATH 1162, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ECON 3740 - Economics of Public Finance

    Goals: To study the theoretical and empirical issues surrounding governmental decisions. Students will analyze and debate public finance topics and examine the implications of policy options for society.

    Content: This course focuses on governmental revenues, expenditures, debt-financing and related policy decisions. Effects of the budget and policy on income distribution, stabilization, efficiency and economic growth are also considered.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1310, ECON 1320, ECON 1330 or PSY 1340 or MATH 1200, and ECON 1340 or MATH 1170 or MATH 1162, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ECON 3750 - Advanced Quantitative Analysis and Data Management


    Goals: To enable students to utilize advanced mathematical models and data management techniques.

    Content: This course covers data management techniques utilizing database applications such as MS Access along with advanced data manipulation and spreadsheet techniques such as table lookup functions, linked spreadsheets, macros, and Visual Basic.

    Taught: Yearly, spring semester

    Prerequisite: ECON 1340

    Credits: 4 

    ECON 3760 - Data Mining


    Goals: Introduce students to data mining techniques and best practices.

    Content: This course includes classification, prediction, data reduction, and data visualization. Advanced regression, network and cluster analysis.

    Taught: Alternate Years

    Prerequisite: ECON 1340

    Credits: 4
     

    ECON 3370 - Environmental Economics

    Goals: To introduce students to the study of environmental issues and resource use, applying economic perspectives and tools.

    Content: This course examines various environmental issues (e.g., pollution, climate change, energy sources) from an economic perspective. Topics include market failures, challenges of economic development, resource management and allocation, and public policy options. Particular attention is paid to cost-benefit analysis, as it is applied to environmental problems.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1310; ECON 1320; ECON 1330, or PSY 1340, or MATH 1200.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ECON 3960 - Internship with Seminar

    Goals: To provide an opportunity to apply students’ skills and knowledge in a working/learning context. To complement internships by providing discussion groups for sharing and crosschecking students’ experiences.

    Content: Students must hold an internship and will also meet once a week as a group to articulate and assess their experiences.

    Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, or consent of the instructor. Primarily intended for economics and management majors, but other majors with administrative internships are welcome.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ECON 5820 - Econometrics

    Goals: To enable students to understand and use economic indicators, time series, and regression analysis in model building and forecasting.

    Content: Estimating model parameters, hypothesis testing, and interpreting economic data.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1310, ECON 1320, ECON 1330, ECON 3110 or ECON 3120, and MATH 1170 or MATH 1162, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    ECON 5860 - Senior Seminar Economics

    Goals: To develop and test economic models through in-depth, independent research in theoretical and applied economics.

    Content: Research methodology and recent analytical and theoretical approaches to questions on topics such as the environment, health care, industrial organization, international economics, labor, money and banking, regional and urban economics, and welfare economics. Students choose a research topic, review the literature, construct a theoretical model, and collect and analyze data for final presentations.

    Prerequisites: ECON 3110, ECON 3120, and ECON 5820, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    Finance Courses

    FIN 1010 - Workshop in Applied Investing

    Goals: To provide opportunity to students to value public companies and receive hands-on experience in the securities industry, all within the context of a non-threatening learning environment. This workshop acts as a portfolio manager deciding how and where to invest a small portion (initially about $35,000) of the university’s actual securities. The course’s mission is to: a) develop an understanding of the stock market, including an appreciation of its innate risk and the development of tools to mitigate risk, b) learn how to apply the financial concepts taught in academic management courses to the real world, c) practice analyzing (valuing) a company from an investor’s perspective, and d) consider social/ethical responsibilities and values of a company in deciding to invest in other companies.

    Content: This workshop acts as a portfolio manager deciding how and where to invest a small portion of the university’s endowed funds. The course’s mission is to: a) develop an understanding of the stock market, including an appreciation of its innate risk and the development of tools to mitigate risk, b) learn how to apply the financial concepts taught in academic management courses to the real world, c) practice analyzing (valuing) a company from an investor’s perspective, and d) consider social/ethical responsibilities and values of a company in deciding to invest in other companies.

    Credits: 2 credits, offered only Pass/No Pass

    FIN 3100 - Foundations of Finance

    Goals: To understand fundamentals of financial management and to analyze quantitative and judgmental aspects of financial situations.

    Content: Business organization, ratio analysis, forecasting, breakeven analysis, working capital management, capital budgeting, valuation, leverage, and financial markets are examined.

    Prerequisites: ACCT 1310; ECON 1310; ECON 1330 or PSY 1430 or MATH 1200; or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits


    FIN 3700 - Financial Markets and Institutions

    Goals: This course introduces knowledge and skills required to be successful in the financial services industry.

    Content: : While examining the financial system of the United States and other countries it introduces students to financial institutions, securities markets, the role of money in the economy, and the monetary system. Financial markets fund much of the expenditures of governments, individuals, and corporations, and financial institutions are the conduit through which funds flow from savers to those with funding needs. The course emphasizes real-world applications on how financial markets and institutions affect the investment decisions of financial managers.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1320 and FIN 3100, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    FIN 3710 - Financial Analysis

    Goals: To demonstrate the use of the theory of financial management as an integral part of making complex business decisions and to prepare students to present and defend their reasoning in a clear and concise manner.

    Content: Fixed asset management, capital structure management, and financial analysis and planning through case analysis.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1320 and FIN 3100, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    FIN 3720 - Investment Management

    Goals: To learn and apply basic concepts of investment management using risk/return analysis and empirical evidence to examine the efficient markets hypothesis, portfolio diversification strategies, securities valuation, and investment decision-making in changing global markets.

    Prerequisite: FIN 3100, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

     FIN 3730 - Corporate Finance

    Goals: To understand and analyze corporate policies and the decision-making that drives financial decisions. Relevant for careers in finance, as well as consulting and strategic planning.

    Content: Capital structure and payout policy, short-term and long-term financial planning, risk management, options and other derivatives, mergers and acquisitions, behavioral finance and international corporate finance.

    Taught: Annually

    Prerequisites: FIN 3100

    Credits: 4 credits

    Management Courses 

    MGMT 3100 - Foundations of Management

    Goals: To understand basic concepts, theories, and research in management and to apply them to practical management problems. To relate the liberal arts to work, using a common theme of ethics.

    Content: The principal functional areas of management (planning, organizing, controlling, and leading) are examined in the context of organizations and groups. Ethical issues and the different views of work from various fields are examined.

    Prerequisites: Sophomore, junior, or senior standing, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    MGMT 3130 - Business Law

    Goals: To provide an overview of the law as it relates to the formation, operation, and completion of business transactions. The course is not only intended to assist the student who plans a career in management, but also the student interested in a legal career.

    Content: Contracts, sales, secured transactions, commercial paper, and bankruptcy.

    Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.

    Credits: 4 credits 

    MGMT 3700 - Human Resource Management

    Goals: To explore the field of human resource (HR) management from the perspective of HR professionals, supervisors, managers, and employees. To learn how to identify and implement human resource policies and practices that are legal, ethical, organizationally sound, and help the organization to achieve its goals.

    Content: Recruiting, interviewing, and placing employees; creating an effective work environment; analyzing jobs; affirmative action and diversity in the workplace; compensation systems; union/management relations; the ethics and legality of human resources decisions; and the strategic nature of human resource management.

    Prerequisites: MGMT 3100, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    MGMT 3710 - Operations Management

    Goals: To explain the basic concepts, principles, and techniques for managing manufacturing and service operations. The course will utilize both quantitative and qualitative methods when exploring techniques that improve the operations of different environments This course is targeted to provide general management students with an appreciation of the function of operational thinking.

    Content: Operational management functions, operations, strategy, product design, service operations design, managing quality, planning and scheduling projects, workforce management, materials management, inventory planning and scheduling, and forecasting.

    Prerequisite: MGMT 3100. Junior or senior standing, or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    MGMT 3720 - International Business Environment

    Goals: To provide an overview of the international business environment including key international institutions. In this course, students will explore the meaning and nature of culture as well as its influence on management functions and international business throughout the world. The course will examine dominant cultural norms in key world regions and effective cross-cultural communication and management methodologies designed to enhance international business success.

    Content: The nature and role of culture in international business and management, regional cultural norms throughout the world, international negotiating and resolution styles, cross-cultural synergy, international business ethics, international human resources management issues, and international organizations that influence business.

    Prerequisite: MGMT 3100. Junior or senior standing, or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    MGMT 3730 - Decision Science

    Goals: To introduce students to decision-making analysis, stressing problem formulation, analytical methods for solution, and use of computer models.

    Content: Decision theory, linear programming, simulation, and implementation.

    Prerequisites: MGMT 3100, MKTG 3100, FIN 3100, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    MGMT 3740 - Organizational Behavior

    Goals: To develop an understanding of this interdisciplinary field so that management from an organizational perspective is enhanced, thus creating and sustaining competitive advantages. To develop and strengthen effectiveness as a leader, manager and team member by introducing frameworks for understanding organizations and the behavior of people and groups within them.

    Key Content Areas include: Diversity in organizations, attitudes, job satisfaction, motivation, group behavior, working in teams, communication, leadership organizational power and politics, conflict and negotiation, organizational structure, organizational culture, organizational change, and human resource policies and practices.

    Prerequisites: MGMT 3100, or consent of the instructor

    Credits: 4 credits 

    MGMT 3750 - Entrepreneurship

    Goals: To expose students to the wide variety of knowledge and skills needed to be a successful entrepreneur or small business manager. To help students integrate their other studies in business, and to understand how the different disciplines apply in starting and running a business.

    Content: This course is an intensive, applied approach to understanding Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management. Topics include selection of organizational form, start up costs, licenses and permits, location selection and layout, operations, management, marketing and advertising, accounting and record-keeping, financial projections, and financial analysis. Throughout the course the students will develop a comprehensive business plan for an organization of their choosing.

    Prerequisites: MGMT 3100 and MKTG 3100, or approval of instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits
     
    MGMT 3760 - Sustainable Enterprise

    Goals: To introduce students to best practices in sustainable management in for-profit, non-profit and governmental entities, including assessment and strategic planning for sustainability initiatives.

    Content: Stakeholder analysis and governance and leadership for sustainable initiatives. Functional areas for sustainability initiatives including production, logistics, facilities management, and marketing. Critical analysis of success/failure of sustainability initiatives in organizations.

    Prerequisites: MGMT 3100, MKTG 3100

    Credits: 4 credits

    MGMT 3770 - Sports Management and Marketing


    Goals: This course is designed to provide an overview of historical perspectives in the sport and recreation management fields as well as their current and future trends.

    Content: Key components will include an examination of the philosophy and function of recreation and an overview of sport management marketing, finance, legal and ethical principles, facilities, and general sport industry divisions.

    Prerequisites: MGMT 3100, MKTG 3100.

    Credits: 4

    MGMT 3780 - Sport Facility Management


    Goal: To introduce students to issues related to management of sport and recreation facilities.

    Content: Students learn the principles and practice involved in (This course provides an introduction to) the planning, design, and maintenance of sport and recreation facilities, from local community facilities to professional settings.

    Prerequisites: MGMT 3770 or PHED 5940

    Credits: 4 

    MGMT 3790 - Promotion and Event Planning

    Goal: To study the application of basic marketing concepts in sport and recreation settings.

    Content: This course builds upon Foundations of Marketing by applying marketing theory and principles in identifying specific strategies for planning and promotion of sport and recreation events in a variety of settings with diverse populations.

    Prerequisites: MKTG 3100

    Credits: 4
     

    MGMT 3960 - Internship with Seminar

    Goals: To provide an opportunity to apply students’ skills and knowledge in a working/learning context. To complement internships by providing discussion groups for sharing and crosschecking students’ experiences.

    Content: Students must hold an internship and will also meet once a week as a group to articulate and assess their experiences.

    Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, or consent of the instructor. Primarily intended for economics and business majors, but other majors with administrative internships are welcome.

    Credits: 4 credits

    MGMT 5860 - Strategic Management

    Goals: To learn to think strategically. To learn to work effectively on a policy setting management team. To develop knowledge and skills necessary to analyze and resolve formulation and implementation issues.

    Content: The formulation and implementation of management strategy, utilizing learning from other business courses and insights from business experiences.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1320, MGMT 3100, MKTG 3100, FIN 3100, and senior standing, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    Marketing Courses

    MKTG 3100 - Foundations of Marketing

    Goals: To understand basic marketing concepts and to apply them to practical marketing problems.

    Content: Legal, behavioral, ethical, competitive, economic, and technological factors are examined as they affect product, price, promotion, and place decisions.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1310 and ECON 1330 or PSY 1340 or MATH 1200, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    MKTG 3700 - Marketing Management

    Goals: To understand marketing management concepts through text and readings. To become familiar with current marketing thought through reading and analysis of journal articles. To function effectively as part of a management team which is addressing marketing problems. To develop an understanding of the principal tools of the marketing manager. To recognize the factors which affect the efficiency and effectiveness of marketing programs.

    Content: The development and implementation of marketing strategy, with particular emphasis on the major components of a marketing program.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1320, MGMT 1320, MGMT 3100, MKTG 3100, and FIN 3100, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    MKTG 3710 - International Marketing

    Goals: To provide students with a fundamental understanding of concepts, theories, issues, and practices related to international and global marketing. The course will explore marketing issues in cross-cultural perspectives and investigate culturally appropriate global opportunities. The course will also address ethical issues related to market development and explore the managerial implications of these cultural and ethical issues as they relate to the market practice.

    Content: Global marketing and marketing research, social and cultural environment, political, legal, and financial environment, segmenting and targeting, exporting and importing, product pricing, distribution, and advertising in the global marketplace.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1320 and MKTG 3100, or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 4 credits

    MKTG 3720 - Market Research

    Goals: This course introduces the fundamentals of market research in order to prepare students to conduct basic research or to be more informed consumers of marketing research services.

    Content: Major topics include the use of secondary research, research design for surveys, experiments, and focus groups, and both quantitative and qualitative data analysis.

    Taught: Spring semester

    Prerequisites: MKTG 3100 and ECON 1330.

    Credits: 4 credits

     MKTG 3740 - Consumer Behavior

    Goals: This course provides students a thorough understanding of consumer behavior and related consumer behavior concepts to marketing theory and practice. The course is structured to enable students to develop critical thinking and decision-making skills in consumer behavior and marketing. By working through consumer behavior problems, cases and exercises, the students get a chance to experience some of the professional challenges, issues, and decisions that face marketers and to develop their marketing knowledge and skills.

    Content: An interdisciplinary approach to the study of consumer behavior, with emphasis on the implications for marketing of theory and findings from the behavioral sciences.

    Prerequisites: ECON 1330 and MKTG 3100

    Credits: 4 credits

    Nonprofit Management Courses

    NPFT 1010 - Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector

    Goals: This course includes an introduction to management and leadership in the nonprofit sector, investigating the critical history of nonprofits as part of our American heritage.

    Content: Concepts of public good, volunteerism, service and servant leadership, organizational structure, mission and management philosophy, the role of philanthropy, reasons for giving, ethics, and organizational development. The course will combine a review of texts, student research, expert guest lecturers,
    workshops and student presentations.

    Credits: 4 credits

    NPFT 3010 - Nonprofit Governance, Finance, and Law

    Goals: This course includes an introduction to nonprofit governance and policy structures, with emphasis on the legal, regulatory, and financial aspects of managing nonprofit organizations.

    Content: Board development, governance, strategic planning, policy making, federal and state reporting requirements, crucial aspects of financial structures and audits, regulatory compliance, and record keeping. Students will work on the processes for creating, growing, and sustaining a nonprofit organization.

    Credits: 4 credits

    NPFT 3020 - Development and Fundraising

    Goals: This course will expose students to the wide variety of development and fundraising activities that are critical for nonprofit growth and sustainability.

    Content: Starting with why individuals, foundations and businesses give to philanthropy, course will include types of gifts, fundraising programs, special events, and grant writing. Special emphases on program goals, outcomes assessment, marketing, and public relations will provide an underlying theme throughout the course. Students will work on actual projects with community partners throughout the course.

    Credits: 4 credits

    NPFT 5860 - Nonprofit Seminar and Internship

    Goals: This capstone course is intended to be the cumulative application of all the competencies developed in the program.

    Content: Internship selection and placement will be finalized during the prior semester to ensure an engaging and productive work experience emphasizing hands-on learning with weekly attendance in a capstone classroom seminar. The internship incorporates education and professional development into a service-learning work experience, including the production of a senior portfolio.

    Credits: 4 credits